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The Watdrford passenger train leaves Glen More and Cork goods leaves Grange and is seen arriving in the Cork fiddle yard. The beet special then leaves Glen More, swapping three emptys for three loads at Keilys Cross before heading for Grange where it crosses the loaded dolomite train heading to Quigly Magnasite East of Dungarvin.

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Edited by patrick
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The dolomite train takes the loop at Glen More and waits for the Waterford Cork passenger train. Both trains then proceed, the dolomite to the Waterford fiddle yard, the passenger to Grange and on to rhe Cork fiddle yard ending the operating session.

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Great work Patrick nice to see prototypical operation.

The signal men at Glenmore and Grange did'nt get much time for fishing or training greyhounds during the beet  season.

There is an interesting photo in Rails Through North Kerry of a Tralee-Listowel goods making a facing shunt at Lixnaw propelling a tank wagon from the station to the County Council siding not sure if you would get away with it around the curve from Grange to the beet siding.

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Think I recognise a few bits on the layout Pat

Very atmospheric, well done, just shows you dont need to clutter it up to make the layout interesting

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8 hours ago, Mayner said:

Great work Patrick nice to see prototypical operation.

The signal men at Glenmore and Grange did'nt get much time for fishing or training greyhounds during the beet  season.

There is an interesting photo in Rails Through North Kerry of a Tralee-Listowel goods making a facing shunt at Lixnaw propelling a tank wagon from the station to the County Council siding not sure if you would get away with it around the curve from Grange to the beet siding.           

I never thought of that John despite the fact that on the two occasions I was fortunate to have travelled on the North Kerry goods that is how the tar traffic was handled at Lixnaw. The same wagon was picked up empty on the return trip. Keilys Cross is about three miles from Grange in the real world, the distance compressed of course on the layout, too far for such a move especially on a busy single track line where a derailment would cause serious delays.

Edited by patrick

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Patrick, thats a fantastic layout. I could have very easily lay down this week and said 'feck it' - but after seeing your recent pictures I am full of ideas. Firstly, something I realised, echoed by Wrenneire is that a layout doesn't need to be full of clutter, or have too much going on. Instead yours oozes atmosphere. This has given me an idea. Outside Omagh there are one or two bridges still in place that carried the GNRi over the Camowen River, not far from where my dad lived as a boy when his father manned the level crossing at Edenderry and lived there in a house provided by the GNRi (built on sleepers that were driven into the ground like modern day piles). This would give my layout the atmosphere it needs and the other bridge closer to town was where the Portadown line branched off to the Market Branch and crossed over the road adjacent to the same river. This is all single track with lots of grass and bushes either side of the line. Thanks for sharing this wonderful piece of work.

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I agree entirely with all of the posts above. This is one of the best layouts I've ever seen in a number of ways. First, the scenery; I am studying it closely as inspiration for what I'm in the process of now. The prototypical operation is exactly what makes it come to life, and have such an atmosphere. This layout is truly a work of art. A miniature world.

Look at the goods stock. We have so, so, many top class, excellent layouts, with long goods trains of standard BR goods stock of types nothing like anything that ran here. This one has "proper" Irish stock. What a difference. Nobody would put a GWR pannier tank on a model of a suburban train to Cobh, so why BR goods stock on a layout set in rural Ballygobackwards?

Finally, the lack of clutter. For realism, it's better a field full of brambles, than a town, refinery, bus station, port and dear knows what else crammed into a corner beside the track.

Top class - does it go to exhibitions?

Edited by jhb171achill

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Although the layout is not fully signalled yet both stations are or will be signalled for bidirectional running. Passenger trains use the platform where the station building is located wherever possible for the convenience of the passengers. I remember this was the case on the Tralee line in the seventies and eighties. Also trains which do not stop or do not cross another train are given the main line so as not having to navigate the diverging route through points. On occasion goods trains are diverted into whatever line is most convenient for shunting. 

Edited by patrick

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Yes, indeed, Patrick, that's common in a number of locations. Was just wondering.

Normally, if crossing something though, they used left hand operation especially if they had two passenger platforms. I'm presuming the road bridge also used as a footbridge?

Either way, a superb layout indeed.

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6 hours ago, jhb171achill said:

 I'm presuming the road bridge also used as a footbridge?

 

Foot bridges are on the to do list, at least for Glen More.  The layout is not designed for exhibitions. Most of it is firmly screwed to the walls. A footplate pass will be issued to you however at a moments notice should you come over to visit to see it but be forewarned that you may be press ganged into service by the operating department! 

Edited by patrick

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Christmas arrived again this Saturday morning unexpectedly in the form of  IRM orange cement bubbles. There is really no logical explanaton for a bulk cement train on my imaginary South Waterford Line as I envision it but these wagons were always a favourite of mine and I just could not pass them up. Congratulations to IRM on another exceptional model and here's hoping CIE tank wagons are in the future!

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That layout captures better than any, the exact type of rural setting on so many lines in the latter half of the 20th century; perfect. Quite the atmosphere, i have to say, that I will be attempting to emulate with my current project.

I'm expecting parcels from Provincial Leslie and several other eminent gentlemen shortly....

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I took a break from running those beautiful IRM cement bubbles long enough to start work on modifing a Hornby footbridge for Glen More. 

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Playing around with different locations for the footbridge in Glen More.

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If you are up for it, there is scope to lower the footbridge to a more realistic height by reducing the first flight of steps. That’s what I’m up to and the result is worthwhile.

Stephen

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11 minutes ago, StevieB said:

If you are up for it, there is scope to lower the footbridge to a more realistic height by reducing the first flight of steps. That’s what I’m up to and the result is worthwhile.

Stephen

Most RTR and kit footbridge models are designed for ground level installation, so when placed higher up on platforms it is ok to reduce the steps by the height of the platform.

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I'd agree with the above comments, dropping the height of the bridge would make it look more prototypical. The other alternative is build your own!:D This one springs to mind. ;)

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Paul

 

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47 minutes ago, StevieB said:

If you are up for it, there is scope to lower the footbridge to a more realistic height by reducing the first flight of steps. That’s what I’m up to and the result is worthwhile.

Stephen

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Hi ,

great thread and great modelling - inspirational in many ways.  If you had a moment any chance of putting up a track plan of how the line is today ?

 

cheers Robert  

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Actually the footbridge  has already been lowered by 10 steps and I may remove a few more. Before starting on it I found some photos on line  showing the model lowered even further but the overall proportions  seemed off, possibly because the model may be too wide. 

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I lowered my footbridge and made it a bit narrower. I might paint it grey or black.

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13 hours ago, Robert Shrives said:

Hi ,

great thread and great modelling - inspirational in many ways.  If you had a moment any chance of putting up a track plan of how the line is today ?

 

cheers Robert  

 

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www.yorkmodelrail.com/00-scale/detailing-steps-bridges-signs/00-scalefootbridge-kit

Patrick, Just a thought on foot bridge the above link for York modelrail is for a generic Scottish  footbridge much in keeping with the one in the photo. I have one in N gauge on office layout at work and was an easy build  might be worth a look at. It comes as a long bridge section between the tower units and can be shortened as needed. The excess would make  good  engineers load.

Robert 

 

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21 hours ago, PaulC said:

I'd agree with the above comments, dropping the height of the bridge would make it look more prototypical. The other alternative is build your own!:D This one springs to mind. ;)

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Paul

 

So glad you posted this Paul, its just as it was in Omagh. 

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