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David Holman

Arigna Town - this week's scenery

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A case of trying to practice what I preach over the last 2 weeks & am pleasantly surprised at how 'little and often' has resulted in some new cameos, with things coming together across the layout.

First up is the garage, though have put a few notes in Workbench on this.

Baseboard 3, next to the fiddle yard, has also seen work done around the cottage, with the signalman's wife now out doing the washing on her [Langley models] mangle. The new pig seems to have escaped - wonder how long it will be before she notices?

Haven't been able to much ground cover, as ran out of fibres, but thought it would be nice to view the station through foliage installed thus far, so we have pictures of the railbus and Small Tank arriving/departing.

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It is Code 100 copperclad, scahalane. Normal 0 gauge is code 124, so the smaller section really helps with the lightweight track image and also enhances the proper track gauge of 36.75mm [or thereabouts!] Points were built by Marcway of Sheffield, have used them before and well worth it for me as though can do such things, they are not my favourite. Plain track much easier. If you are doing 7mm scale Irish, then broad gauge has few problems, other than the usual lack of anything RTR. Slaters do an extended loco axle, albeit a fiver a go, while their wagon wheels can be eased out without compromising W irons etc.

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WASHING.jpg

 

apart from the railway - modelling dosent get much better than this - all you need is a few chickens!!!!=D

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David, that is truly stunning work. The layout is spectacular well done :tumbsup:

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David this is truly inspirational and challenges me to gain a higher level in my own modelling. If you don't mind I may pick your brain with a few questions here and there along the way. You have an attention to detail that is breath taking. The small details really make it. Can you recommend some good books to get to guide me along with my own layout?

 

I can't wait to see more and thank you again for sharing.

 

Phil

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Little if any of my work is original Phil and I've been inspired and helped by many over the years.

For layout design and all things constructional, you can't go far wrong with Iain Rice. 'Finescale in Small Spaces' has lots of layout plans, but also goes into detail on layout composition, sight lines, view blockers and the like. We are creating a 3D picture, so getting composition right is a bit part. Any of Iain's other stuff is also worth reading too and it is all fairly simple and just good common sense.

Barry Norman's 'Landscape modelling' has been out a while now but dealt with the basics of scenic work and is still relevant today.

Even older are John Ahern's books on buildings & locos. written first in the early 1950s, I nevertheless still refer to them as they deal with basic skills such as how to do building shells, make simple chassis etc.

The books that currently get most use are Martyn Welch's The Art of Weathering and Gordon Gravetts ones on Trees and [just out] Grass. The weathering book does buildings and track as well as locos and stock and is just invaluable because he takes you step by step through the process and tells you exactly what colour paints to use. Gordon's books use the same method and add in materials, where to get them and even how long a model might take. Very readable and believable too.

While I'm reasonable confident with scenic work these days [& have the key tools such as the static Grasstech machine], waited for Gordon's new book on grass before doing that phase on Arigna town because having seen his work numerous times, wanted to get that step by step approach.

If you can afford 3 books, I'd go for these last ones mentioned. If only one, get the Gravett 'grass' book.

Magazines are also a good source of ideas and don't just stick to mainstream 'British/Irish' ones. the US Model Railroader has lots of good ideas, while Narrow Gauge & Shortline Gazette is also fab if you can find it. Model Railway Journal is a regular source of ideas, though can get a bit technical at times.

Also been very fortunate over the years to meet some wonderful people at my local club & various shows. If you have a local club, it is always worth joining. Mine has most of the mags on subscription too, plus a range of more expensive tools like lathe, grass tech etc.

Most of all, never be frightened to experiment. A small diorama or little cameo scene can bring quick results and build confidence.

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I agree fully with Seamus's post as it really says rural Ireland in that photograph. Stunning stuff again.

 

Rich,

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Little if any of my work is original Phil and I've been inspired and helped by many over the years.

For layout design and all things constructional, you can't go far wrong with Iain Rice. 'Finescale in Small Spaces' has lots of layout plans, but also goes into detail on layout composition, sight lines, view blockers and the like. We are creating a 3D picture, so getting composition right is a bit part. Any of Iain's other stuff is also worth reading too and it is all fairly simple and just good common sense.

Barry Norman's 'Landscape modelling' has been out a while now but dealt with the basics of scenic work and is still relevant today.

Even older are John Ahern's books on buildings & locos. written first in the early 1950s, I nevertheless still refer to them as they deal with basic skills such as how to do building shells, make simple chassis etc.

The books that currently get most use are Martyn Welch's The Art of Weathering and Gordon Gravetts ones on Trees and [just out] Grass. The weathering book does buildings and track as well as locos and stock and is just invaluable because he takes you step by step through the process and tells you exactly what colour paints to use. Gordon's books use the same method and add in materials, where to get them and even how long a model might take. Very readable and believable too.

While I'm reasonable confident with scenic work these days [& have the key tools such as the static Grasstech machine], waited for Gordon's new book on grass before doing that phase on Arigna town because having seen his work numerous times, wanted to get that step by step approach.

If you can afford 3 books, I'd go for these last ones mentioned. If only one, get the Gravett 'grass' book.

Magazines are also a good source of ideas and don't just stick to mainstream 'British/Irish' ones. the US Model Railroader has lots of good ideas, while Narrow Gauge & Shortline Gazette is also fab if you can find it. Model Railway Journal is a regular source of ideas, though can get a bit technical at times.

Also been very fortunate over the years to meet some wonderful people at my local club & various shows. If you have a local club, it is always worth joining. Mine has most of the mags on subscription too, plus a range of more expensive tools like lathe, grass tech etc.

Most of all, never be frightened to experiment. A small diorama or little cameo scene can bring quick results and build confidence.

 

Thanks a lot mate. Will start tracking down those books in the next month. Once again love your work and can't wait to see more. I have started experimenting with DAS clay and can recommend it if you in future get interested in architectural scratch building.

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Been there, done it, Phil.

Gordon Gravett a serial user for brickwork and random stone, though when I tried, it drove nuts! this is the bloke who happily painted Howard Scenics embossed card bricks one at a time for a while... Do use it a lot for infill, which doesn't say much about some of my measuring...

On Arigna town, it was used for the capping stones on the station walls, along with chimney flashings etc. Works best if a layer of PVA is put on first, but am sure you know that.

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There was interest in weed infested track on the Bord Na Mona layout earlier this week, so here are a few pics of what I do.

When knowing I want weeds between the rails, I am less careful with ballasting, at least in terms of coverage; then any bare patches become home for the weeds. Hence first pic shows a piece of track like this on the cattle dock. The next shows it with blobs of PVA in the bare patches, then comes the effect of puffing short fibres on to the glue from a Noch puffer bottle. Also reminds me that I only painted the outside face of the rails, so another job added to the list.

Eventually, will add more fibres and once 'set' will smear further PVA on top of some areas to add fine scatter to make weeds, as per elsewhere on the layout.

The last couple of pictures show the final area to be covered with 'grass'. This is the field in front of the station. At the moment, this is only the first stage, for though it has been dressed with a mix of 4 different coloured fibres [using an electrostatic Grasstech], you can see how plain and featureless this patch is, especially compared to even the partly done section next to the turntable. Spray varnish, scatter material & postiche, as before, will be used to build up the variety of both textures and colours, as per the real thing.DSCN0596.jpg

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David,

 

What superlative do I use? Your work is just wonderful. LOVE the weeds on the permanent way. Verisimilitude how are yah!

 

 

"Most of all, never be frightened to experiment". Absolutely. That is exactly the way to get things done. If it goes right, result. If not, just try again, with the added bonus of experience.

Edited by Weshty

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Wonderful David it just looks right, the way the track stretches out in front of the viewer makes it fell like you are standing there behind the camera.

 

Rich,

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Though there is still a lot of detailing to do, much of the layout is at least now covered with scenic materials, so here are some views of areas that have not been seen for a while.

The sharp eyed among you will notice that the butter factory is now Leitrim co-op - an ideal [if fictitious] source of van traffic both in and out of Arigna. There are people too, while the view across the field to the station and yard is enhanced with the last bit of greenery filled in. See previous post and the workbench forum for more details, plus the buffer stops post for close ups there.DSCN0643.jpg

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David,

 

When will you show us a few photos of your modelling, and not these old shots of the prototype? ;)

 

Seriously, staggeringly gorgeous stuff sir! :)

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Ah jayz David, but those shots are only wonderful. You make it look effortless.

 

Grass on the permanent way, lightly rusted rails and a wooden bufferbeam on the Lissadell. Is it real wood??

 

Glorious.

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Even puddles on the path. And those hens are making me hungry.

 

This is as good as modelling ever gets - outstanding - can't wait to see it some day if it's at a show.

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Many thanks for the kind comments. The bufferbeam is indeed wood, rather than brass supplied in the kit. However, must admit to serious error as loco is Hazelwood, which should of course have a different cab. Gawd knows how many hours I spent checking photos to miss that! At some point will have to add the extra bits...

 

Fingers crossed, Arigna Town will make its debut at the Chatham Show in early June. After that, open to offers. Would love to take it to Ireland eventually. One day perhaps.

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I must say, this ranks among the best few layouts I've ever seen. Really appreciate you posting the pictures David, they're an inspiration.

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Pete Waterman sells his 7mm stuff under the banner of 'Just like the real thing',your photographs of your layout actually are just like the real thing.Fantastic modelling,well done

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Below are a few more pictures of the layout in its more scenically finished state. Essentially they try to portray the arrival of a goods train, with SLNCR Small Tank in charge, plus some shots of it shunting. Have tried to take the pictures from 'natural' angles - either the top of the water tower, trackside, or beyond the hedge looking across the station.

The are a couple of shots of Railbus 2a arriving as well. DSCN0673.jpg

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Stunning, its looks so natural with a lovely atmosphere. Well done :tumbsup:

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In my top five favourite layouts. Stunning... If my work can be half as good as yours I'd be over the moon. Simple beautiful. It's 4D art mate. Merry Christmas and all the best in your modelling endeavours in 2014.

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Absolutely brilliant David and very inspiring. You have shown how to pack in scenic detail and get a sense of depth with the blending in to that marvellously evocative background. It looks like a real railway in a real landscape with authentic trains to match. Best wishes, Paul.

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