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josefstadt

Irish Shell & BP

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There seems to be at least 3 variations of the CIE 26695-26772 series CIE-Burmah tank wagon that I can see. The tank in the first image is shorter than the 20' wagon base with 12 support brackets where as the tank in the second image seems to be the full length of the 20' wagon with 13 support brackets. The tank in the 3rd image is similar in length to the 1st but with a different support cradle. Would anyone have any drawings of these wagons?

 

[ATTACH=CONFIG]16532[/ATTACH]

 

[ATTACH=CONFIG]16533[/ATTACH]

 

[ATTACH=CONFIG]16535[/ATTACH]

 

Not sure where I got these images from so I hope the photographer doesn't mind me using them.

 

Most of the IE store oil and molasses tank wagons were originally built for specific traffic flows such as Irish Cement, Quigley Magnesite, Burmah Oil and possibly Texaco. Many of these wagons basically became surplus to requirements during the 1980s with the ending of the Irish Cement and Quigley Magnesite traffics.

The wagons were built in small batches 26570-89 Irish Cement 1966, 26628-31 Irish Cement? 1967, 26636-52 Quigley Magnesite?, 26723-26728 Burmah Oil 1972, 26720-26740 1978.

Most of the latter tank wagons including 26640, & the “Burmah” tank wagons were built on the standard 20’ container wagon underframes complete with cuplocks.

Originally the store oil wagons were numbered in the Departmental wagon number series similar to 629A, 26640 and 26748 appear to be ex-traffic tank wagons converted to carry store oil.

26748 is a bit of a mystery as 26740 was the highest numbered tank wagon recorded by Doyke and Hirch in Locomotives and Rolling Stock of IE & NIR 1987.

26748 appears to be one of the earlier Irish Cement tank wagons with an anchor mounted tank and no cuplocks. It’s possible that IE may have re-numbered some of the 26570 series wagons following a change in use from carrying heavy fuel oil to diesel or molasses.

Funnily enough I have a weight drawing of a CIE Fuel Tank wagon but it has the long tank barrel with 13 ribs similar to 26640

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Theres a small bit of footage on here, some handy views of the unloading systems at ballinacourty.

footage of trains at 11/18/22-24/37-38/40/42-45 & 59 minute marks.

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Theres a small bit of footage on here, some handy views of the unloading systems at ballinacourty.

footage of trains at 11/18/22-24/37-38/40/42-45 & 59 minute marks.

 

Some grand footage of the magnesite and oil train in that video! :tumbsup: It even shows the last magnesite train pulling out of the factory. 011 had the honours of hauling the last load. It's only when you see the quality of the recording that you realise how long ago it actually is now since the factory was operating. The workers seem happy enough about the closure, if the images on the video are anything to go by. Thanks for posting it! :)

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Going through old copies of the CIÉ staff paper Nuacht, I came across this photo in the January 1970 edition:

Duckhams Oil Tank Container r.jpg

 

The caption reads:

‘Duckham’s Motor Oil frequently travels to Cork on the B+I Liner Train. The oil tank is secured in a special cradle which is locked in position on the rail truck and is lifted on and off in the same manner the ISO containers. Built by Metro-Cammell and owned by CIE, the cradle when empty tares at 1 ton 17 cwt: it is at present used only on the liner trains.’

 

Anybody any further info on this? It looks like the tank could have come from an old wagon and that the cradle supporting it fitted into and was secured to an ISO body (half height container without its sides?).

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Just a thought, that Duckhams wagon looks a bit like the tanks that run on the weedspray train. They are on demountable ISO frames.

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Just a thought, that Duckhams wagon looks a bit like the tanks that run on the weedspray train. They are on demountable ISO frames.

 

Another little surprise it looks like the weedspray train tanks have Bulled triangulated ISO demountable frames. :confused:

 

 

It looks like CIE may have simply chopped off the running gear from some 1950s era anchor mounted tank wagons and grafted ISO cuplock pockets on to the ends of the existing underframes. The original wagons were fairly modern in design with welded tanks and anchor mounting compared to the Oil company owned wagons, but fairly low tank capacity.

 

CIE appear to have built relatively few tank wagons in the 50s most seem to have been originally for bitumen or industrial alcohol traffic from Ballina, Derry or Dundalk.

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Some grand footage of the magnesite and oil train in that video! :tumbsup: It even shows the last magnesite train pulling out of the factory. 011 had the honours of hauling the last load. It's only when you see the quality of the recording that you realise how long ago it actually is now since the factory was operating. The workers seem happy enough about the closure, if the images on the video are anything to go by. Thanks for posting it! :)

 

Did you see Michael Wyses piece on the Waterford History facebook page?

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Did you see Michael Wyses piece on the Waterford History facebook page?

 

Saw it just now! :) It is me who was asking the questions on that thread. Thanks for letting me know anyway! :tumbsup:

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I would be strongly inclined to agree, Mayner. As close as you can see on that picture of the Duckham's tank, it looks like it. New build tankers by then would have probably had an entirely different profile.

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Irish Shell - BP Tankers

 

Best detailed photograph of these Tankers I've come across. Belfast 1964.

Photo by Terence Dorrity.

 

Oil%20Wagons%201964%20Terence%20Dorrity.jpg

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Is there a prototype wagon or piece of rolling stock you don't have Kieran!

 

I forgot about these.

 

IMG_2897x.jpg

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http://catalogue.nli.ie/Collection/vtls000148612/Home?lookfor=&type=AllFields&page=229&view=list

 

Bitumen tank wagon from the O'Dea collection.

 

 

Tank Wagon 001 shrink.jpg

 

This is a representation of one of these wagons using a repainted Bachmann tank wagon. Trying to remove the factory lettering proved so difficult so I simply gave it an overall coat of matt black using a spray can. The outline of the Shell lettering can be seen in the photo but is not at all apparent on the layout. The tank ends are wrong, I may go back and change then in the future and the lettering is simply done on my printer on paper and applied with a glue stick. If SSM dosn't come up with a set of decals I may have to print my on on white decal paper! I doubt if the large Tar Bitumen lettering lasted long on the prototype so I lettered it similar to how similar wagons were lettered in the seventies.

 

The Bachmann model is also very similar to the fuel oil tank at Dublin port in my previous post although the brake gear is different.

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Patrick, may I suggest using a fibreglass brush to remove the factory lettering if you decide to do any changes.

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This is a great thread, I am glad I found it as I am trying to model the weed-spray train tankers at the moment. I am trying to figure out what I have three tanks in cradles made and painted yellow, but am trying to figure out what colour the frame/flat it sits on is. it looks to me to be brown/gray, looking at the video posted by Mayner on page 8, can anyone advise please? thanks again guys.

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The weedspray tankers are possibly the oldest serving part of rolling stock left on the network, and derive from these wagons with the Bullied Triangulated Underframe. Effectively they cut the undergear off, placed them on 4 wheel 20/22' flats or 42's with a few iso mounts welded on, and off they went.

 

Fuel Oil Docks.jpg

 

As far as colour is concerned, I think "dirt" is the shade yer looking for :)

 

9226773002_17900d89c7_o.jpg

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http://catalogue.nli.ie/Collection/vtls000148612/Home?lookfor=&type=AllFields&page=229&view=list

 

Bitumen tank wagon from the O'Dea collection.

 

 

attachment.php?attachmentid=25510&stc=1

 

This is a representation of one of these wagons using a repainted Bachmann tank wagon. Trying to remove the factory lettering proved so difficult so I simply gave it an overall coat of matt black using a spray can. The outline of the Shell lettering can be seen in the photo but is not at all apparent on the layout. The tank ends are wrong, I may go back and change then in the future and the lettering is simply done on my printer on paper and applied with a glue stick. If SSM dosn't come up with a set of decals I may have to print my on on white decal paper! I doubt if the large Tar Bitumen lettering lasted long on the prototype so I lettered it similar to how similar wagons were lettered in the seventies.

 

The Bachmann model is also very similar to the fuel oil tank at Dublin port in my previous post although the brake gear is different.

 

Some of the Bitumen tank wagons were built by CIE incl 23826 which had the Irish brake gear others ncl 23855, 25002 & 25018 by Charles Roberts Rotherham with brake gear similar to the new Bachmann anchor mounted tank wagon. ESSO seem to have imported some more modern bitumen tank wagons along with its BRMK1 Class A & B tank wagons in the late 60s some were stored OOU in the Dardanelles until the yard was re-built around 2003. The MK1 bitumen tank wagons were similar to the Dapol tank wagon with a slightly larger diameter barrel & coned ends. The are likely to be photos of the originals somewhere on Paul Bartells web site

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scan0049.jpg

CIE bitumen tank wagon Galway

 

Irish Shell & BP.jpg

Irish Shell pole fields Point Yard

Most of the older CIE & private owner tank wagons were stored near the Sherriff St level crossing for the best part of 30 years until the yard was cleared out around 2002.

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Tanks for carrying and storing bitumen would be insulated, probably with the dreaded asbestos, and the visible external skin is only thin sheet metal. The tanks normally had internal steam coils to heat the bitumen keeping it fluid and the external parts of these pipes were lagged with asbestos tape wound on like a bandage, or a thicker type that had its own metal cover. The HSE regs; for handling bitumen are quite extensive!

Mick

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The O' Dea shots are amazingly clear and you can see the cap on what I'm presuming is a filler/discharge pipe? under the chassis on both sides, T'd into the tank above. One of the O' Dea pictures has the hose attached on 25008 and warning signs of the thin shell on 25009. Where were the heating coils and what supplied steam when they were in transit?

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Nice find I have HMRS photos of three of these tank cars23855,25002 & 25018 on standard gauge transporter wagons in the UK .23855 has the thin shell plackard for the dockers slinging the wagons at the port.

 

The steam coils are inside the tank, heat is only applied during unloading. CIE & the County Councils built boiler houses at the unloading points.

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Nice find I have HMRS photos of three of these tank cars23855,25002 & 25018 on standard gauge transporter wagons in the UK .23855 has the thin shell plackard for the dockers slinging the wagons at the port.

 

The steam coils are inside the tank, heat is only applied during unloading. CIE & the County Councils built boiler houses at the unloading points.

Thanks, John. Were they filled from above and discharged from the pipes beneath?

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Posted (edited)

If SSM doesn't come up with a set of decals I may have to print my on on white decal paper!

 

I've completed a set of TAR BITUMEN. large and small versions and the four numbers with the "not to be loose shunted" detail as well :). Drop me a line for the order.

Edited by Weshty

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