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David Holman

David's Workbench

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David, as Jimmy Magee once famously said about Diego Maradona on TV this modelling is "A different class . . . different class"

If you have any video clips of the stock in operation would love to see it.

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Just unbelievable work.  I think the modeller is his own worst critic knowing every little blemish and wrong path taken when striving for perfection.  To everyone else, you have achieved perfection and have to deal with the green eyes of envy. xD Presently, I'm very very green!

Paul

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It all looks great to me but i think you are a perfectionist.

You know where the bad bits are so you see them but nobody else does. =D=D=D

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Thanks chaps, but were you able to see closer you would note that:

- there are gaps where will glazing does do not fit properly on both ends of the trailer

- half the panes are stained on the inside by solvent;

- the trailer sides go inwards at the waist, I think this happened when I was filing the roof and squeezed the body;

- there is paint on the inside of the glazing that I can't get to to clean off

 It all stems from my decision to fix the roof on before filing it to shape. Seemed like a good idea at the time, but I hadn't noticed all the issues with the glazing. This is sandwiched between inner and outer layers, so with the roof fixed on is impossible to replace without a complete rebuild.

 The trouble is that once you know something is there, it sticks out like a sore thumb. Oh yes, and the paint job may look alright in the pictures, but is nowhere near like you get from an air brush or spray can.

 At least the positive comments make me feel better, so many thanks for that. Am sure it will be fine for a while and with a compensated chassis, plus pick ups on the trailer bogie, should run well, but if I have time before the Uckfield show in October, the trailer will get rebuilt. The audience are very close at this venue and given they pay good money to come in, I always feel I owe folk to do the best I can. Should be able to salvage the bogie, seats and roof, while the tractor unit is (fingers crossed) fine.

 It may even benefit from simply being left alone for a bit while I do something else. This has worked before, but I'm not holding my breath!

 I had (proper) flu in early December and the lyrics of David Crosby from the great hippy anthem 'Almost Cut My Hair' on the Déjà Vu album come to mind:

"Because I had flu at Christmas, I'm not feeling up to par,

It increases my paranoia, like looking in the mirror and seeing a po-lice car."

 Well, I know what I mean. I think!

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Thought I'd better show you what is bugging me about the railcar...

The glazing at the rear was missed when I put the roof on. As you can see, there is a gap at the top. Measure twice, cut once etc. The rest of the glazing is just poor workmanship I'm afraid. When I eventually rebuild the trailer, I must make it so the roof is removable and the glazing pants can slide in after painting.

 However, from a distance of a couple of feet or more, the model is ok, while if you are looking at the photos on a laptop screen, then the model is at least 4x life size [it is actually just 7" long]. At least it has captured the character of the prototype and hopefully I can keep that when it is eventually rebuilt.

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43 minutes ago, David Holman said:

Thought I'd better show you what is bugging me about the railcar...

The glazing at the rear was missed when I put the roof on. As you can see, there is a gap at the top. Measure twice, cut once etc. The rest of the glazing is just poor workmanship I'm afraid. When I eventually rebuild the trailer, I must make it so the roof is removable and the glazing pants can slide in after painting.

 However, from a distance of a couple of feet or more, the model is ok, while if you are looking at the photos on a laptop screen, then the model is at least 4x life size [it is actually just 7" long]. At least it has captured the character of the prototype and hopefully I can keep that when it is eventually rebuilt.

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You could consider using Deluxe Glue and Glaze to cover the gap for now?

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Nice thought, but I have to agree with Andy. It is ok for signal spectacles and similar small, round holes, but not these apertures.

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A new building

 I've probably said this before, but what I love most about our hobby is that it takes you in so many different directions and after the self induced stresses of the railcar, it seemed something different was appropriate. Hence another building for Fintonagh - 'The Tram'.

 Yet another pub/bar, this one slightly different in that it will not be fixed down, as it covers the baseboard & back scene joint. Very much freelance, inspiration came from some of my own pictures, plus one or two in the Alphagraphix catalogue. Construction is around a foam board core, though the rendering is more simply done than before, using good quality drawing paper stuck down with PVA. The paper has a degree of texture and can be cut & folded into window & door apertures, saving quite a bit of time compared to covering with DAS clay. This works even better in smaller scales & when painted [Precision 'weathered rendering'], it seems to enhance the textured surface a little too.

 Windows & doors are plasticard sheet & strip, the former built on clear glazing to give the correct rebate you see on sashes. The roof is mounting board, covered with strips of drawing paper snipped with scissors to give 18" x 12" slates. Guttering is my usual 80thou  plastic, with the outer edge sanded round and 80thou plastic rod for the down pipes. Two layers of masking tape, cut into thin strips represent the mounting plates. Other details included some etched door furniture [Scale Link], a cast white metal chimney pot, tissue paper for net curtains and coloured paper for the main curtains. The pub sign is a colour picture reduced from the one in the Ragstone kit of the Sharp Stewart 0-4-2T, while the name board was done on the computer.

 Painting is mostly Tamiya acrylics [apart from the rendering] , plus Precision 'slate' for the roof. Needless to say, a fair amount of care was taken with the glazing!

 A bit more weathering is still required - I imagine this will a local more on the seedy side of life. The fact that the curtains are drawn on the bar, even in daytime, suggests something nefarious is going on inside, perhaps. Eventually, while groundwork will be built up around the base of the building, much of it will be hidden by a 6 foot stone wall that will separate the railway track from the road, while an extra tree should hide the right hand side where it meets the back scene..

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Is the premises of N Johnston there possibly that of a well known railway book publisher?

See you in the Tram - it's just sixpence a pint. Up the road in Omagh it's seven pence - ridiculous. How are you supposed to live on £3 a week with that sort of thing? Hornby coaches are now nine shillings* each!

(* 45p / €0.50c)

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Correct, JB and next door is Patterson's chemist. Not sure what 'Edward M' was a doctor of, but I like to include these pioneering authors where I can. When I went to college, beer was 14p a pint, though with a friend behind the bar you could get 7/8 of a pint of McEwan's Export with a [pint] bottle of Newcastle Brown for 22p. Guinness was available for a while, but the suppliers insisted on a minimum of one nine gallon barrel a week, which proved a bit much with only 4 of us drinking it on a regular basis.

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Ah! That's 72 pints. Here, they were 88 pints!

First round of drink I ever bought, about 1976, was three pints and you had change from a £1 note. 32p a pint.

A night out with £5 was quite feasible. 50p to get into a night club, 32p a pint, and a burger PLUS chips on the way home 36 or 38p....

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11 hours ago, jhb171achill said:

Is the premises of N Johnston there possibly that of a well known railway book publisher?

See you in the Tram - it's just sixpence a pint. Up the road in Omagh it's seven pence - ridiculous. How are you supposed to live on £3 a week with that sort of thing? Hornby coaches are now nine shillings* each!

(* 45p / €0.50c)

Next time I'm talking to Normans son Wesley I'll tell him that his dads memory lives on. I first met the man in 1975 - a real gentleman.

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Not surprised to hear that about Norman Johnson, while modellers and historians are forever in his debt. The likes of Des Coakham, E M Patterson, JC Boyd etc to name but a few as well. In mainland Britain, there were a great number of people recording the railway scene. Indeed, probably a book or two on pretty much any subject you could wish for. Researching the Irish scene nowhere near as easy, so we must also be thankful for the IRRS, Neil Sprinks, Tom Ferris and JHB of this parish of course.

Thank you all!

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The Temperance Hotel

 With a couple of boozers on the layout, I thought it might be an idea to do something for the Temperance movement. Purely historical interest of course - as someone with a 50 bottle wine rack, happy to refill it with a 'booze run' a couple of times a year, I'm not about to sign the pledge any time soon! A small advantage to living in SE England is its proximity to France and a day trip to a supermarche makes a nice outing, especially as it will include lunch too. Indeed, it is arguably quicker for me to drive to Switzerland, than it is to Scotland.

 Be that as it may, having got the bit between my teeth with the Tram Inn, the next building along, being very low relief, promised a fairly quick build - and so it has proved. Perhaps the hardest bit was deciding what the building would be, but a leaf through one of my favourite books soon provided the answer. John Ahern's 'Model Building Construction' was first produced in 1950, when 'cow gum' and 'Seccotine' were the acme in terms of adhesives, while PVA probably hadn't even been thought of. However, what the book does is take you through all the techniques you might need in terms of building structures, while [because of its age], the models described are ideal for the period of 1930s to 1950s. John Ahern of course was the man who built the Madder Valley Railway - one of the first ever truly scenic layouts - which can still be seen at Pendon Museum. The Temperance Hotel can be seen in Madderport & this gave me the spark of an idea.

 According to Google, the temperance movement in Ireland, dedicated to lowering alcohol consumption, involved both Protestant & Catholic leaders. The Teetotal Abstinence Society was founded in 1838, with thousands signing the pledge. However, in 1898 one James Cullen founded the Pioneer Total Abstinance Association, apparently because enthusiasm for the original group was fading. Hence, it seemed appropriate to give him a mention on my hotel & tea rooms.

 All in all then, a lengthy pre-amble to a bit of low relief modelling. The building is made in the same way as the Tram Inn. I did add a bit of interior detail, which can just be seen above the net curtains & through the doors. Extra colour is provided by the window box, which is just a piece of balsa, covered in Woodlands 'medium scatter' and sprinkled with a red flower mix. The tricky bit has been trying to blend the model into the back scene. The roof line needs adjusting slightly & of course the paving slabs are yet to be added, but overall, it was an enjoyable little exercise.

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Temperance? Temperance? No, I don't go for these new craft beers. Gimme a pint of stout any day.

I like the cracked road surface. How did you make that?

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One of the redoubtable Mr Gravett's ideas, JB. The sub structure of the road is mounting board, set with a piece running longitudinally down the centre, to give the camber. The card is then covered with gloss enamel paint [dark grey] and then liberally coated with talc while still wet. Spread evenly and allow to dry before vacuuming up the residue. The crack you mention is actually a joint between two pieces of card, filled with DAS clay and sanded smooth. Tippex works well to simulate road repairs too. More paint/talc on top of course. Another way of doing road surfaces is to use wet & dry sandpaper. Precision paints do a nice matt tarmac is you go this way.

 Given the layout is 7mm scale, a smooth road surface still works well, so smaller scales certainly don't need anything coarse.

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