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Noel

Mac - El Capitan

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Delayed moving from Mavericks to El Capitan until this week. I usually wait some months to let new software releases get sorted. Seems to be working fine so far. Just needed the Outlook 2011 patch, but upgraded to Office 2016 for free anyway under 365 subscription, and few minor tweaks to get MAMP working again after OSX 10.11.1 updated Apache and PHP to the latest versions. VMware Fusion was unaffected.

 

Just thought I'd pass it on to any Mac users here in case it was of any use. I usually dread major updates, but this one was painless.

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Doesnt work with my Windows 97 jobbie

 

Not surprised Dave as you must be the sole user of 'Windows 97' :)

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I've actually seen it.

 

[ATTACH=CONFIG]21078[/ATTACH]

 

1st Unix system I worked on in 1982 a Fortune 32:16, after I had cut my teeth with UCSD Pascal on an Apple II

Fortune_3216_System_1.jpg

 

1977-apple-ii-monitor.jpg?quality=80&strip=info

 

Ah 5" floppy discs seemed so modern compared to 8" floppy discs and especially paper punch tape! :)

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We had a Commodore Pet in 1978.

 

pet2001-black.jpg

 

The first thing I ever used with a screen - all teletypes before that.

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We had a Commodore Pet in 1978.

 

[ATTACH=CONFIG]21131[/ATTACH]

 

The first thing I ever used with a screen - all teletypes before that.

 

Yes Commodore Pet along with the TRS-80 and Apple II were the 3 classics of that time.

 

My first electronic computer was a kit built UK 101 with 4k memory (used 6502 assembler) - same era as the Pet

 

original.jpg

 

The 1st computer I got paid to work on was a Honeywell 1015 - I was just a kid but was in awe at the size and roar of that living machine - a mainframe in its day, probably less powerful than my wrist watch now.

honeywell1015computer.jpg.w560h775.jpg

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Interesting to hear about El Capitan - the website reviews are not exactly encouraging & as a fairly recent Mac user, I'm still getting used to all the foibles of Yosemite.

As for early computers, in my teaching days, persuaded my headteacher to invest in a Sinclair ZX81. Now there was a machine! The handbook was bigger than the 'computer', the 'hard drive was a cassette player and the internal memory was 1k - yes, 1000bytes, or three fifths of five eights of sod all. Not good, but it was all we knew [& could afford] at the time...

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Interesting to hear about El Capitan - the website reviews are not exactly encouraging & as a fairly recent Mac user, I'm still getting used to all the foibles of Yosemite.

As for early computers, in my teaching days, persuaded my headteacher to invest in a Sinclair ZX81. Now there was a machine! The handbook was bigger than the 'computer', the 'hard drive was a cassette player and the internal memory was 1k - yes, 1000bytes, or three fifths of five eights of sod all. Not good, but it was all we knew [& could afford] at the time...

 

If you are on Yosemite there is no urgency to move to El Capitan as the big feature jump was Yosemite, but coming from Mavericks there were some new bits worth getting. The need to keep up to date is not part of the past Apple culture.

 

The ZX81 - that was considered the height of modernity and luxury back then compared to the stuff we started on - colour, and remember the screen flickered every time you pressed a key. But it was the 1st affordable 'micro' computer of that era dominated by Commodore Pet, Apple II, and Tandy TRS80. Then the Act Sirius one with MS-DOS changed everything 12months before IBM launched the PC which was technically inferior at every spec level to the Sirius One. The rest is history, but the likes of Altos, Fortune and CT were fun along the way. The world nearly spun off its axis when the daisy wheel printer was replaced by NLQ matrix and Laser printers (i.e. the word laser from si-fi movies instilling a sense of ultra modernity and star wars, flash gordon, etc). Memories . . .

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....The ZX81 - that was considered the height of modernity and luxury back then compared to the stuff we started on - colour, and remember the screen flickered every time you pressed a key. But it was the 1st affordable 'micro' computer of that era dominated by Commodore Pet, Apple II, and Tandy TRS80. . . .

 

The ZX81 was resolutely black-and-white, like its predecessor the ZX80. Its flat keyboard was unaffected by drinks spilled on it and it came with 1k RAM as standard. You could get a plug-in 16k RAM module that went in the back of it. It was no feckin' use at all.

 

Colour didn't really come about properly until the ZX Spectrum, Commodore VIC-20 and C64. Also the ORIC-1, plus contemporary BBC Model B and Acorn Electron. There, I'm showin' me age now, so I am.

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Ah, Oric 1 was me first computer, lovely wee machine - impressive as it had a built in sound 'processor' that could pump out various noises on demand from the built in BASIC!

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The ZX81 was resolutely black-and-white, like its predecessor the ZX80. Its flat keyboard was unaffected by drinks spilled on it and it came with 1k RAM as standard. You could get a plug-in 16k RAM module that went in the back of it. It was no feckin' use at all.

 

Colour didn't really come about properly until the ZX Spectrum, Commodore VIC-20 and C64. Also the ORIC-1, plus contemporary BBC Model B and Acorn Electron. There, I'm showin' me age now, so I am.

Ah yes you are right I got the ZX81 and the Spectrum mixed up.

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