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GSR 800

The official Irish" Conversion" thread

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When I bought a patriot and a Scot(to convert) I found both had problems with gears not meshing properly, and poor pulling power

 

Thanks for that. I take they were Mainline? Might just burst the purse strings and get a bachy one. . .

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No, actually they were the more modern Hornby ones.

 

JAYSUS. Bit off topic here but has anyone had problems with the Bachmann Wolly (k class) Have some and they just seem to be terrible runners, loud, not smooth, derails, just awful for a modern loco.

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I only have the Murphy version and they are all a joy. Great runners, fine pullers.

 

Strange, I have a murphy one and the tender usually derails,especially on bends. Very noisy runner. I'm sure there is a fix but I'm not the most technically minded. . .

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My one is in the cripple siding with motion gear problems......

 

I suspect gear problems too, hence the noise

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The problem with mine was that the pony truck keeps derailing. Very annoying.

Edited by GSR 800

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Thought originally that it was the tight bends on the layout so they were replaced with larger radius track, but the problems persist

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Thought originally that it was the tight bends on the layout so they were replaced with larger radius track, but the problems persist

 

Check the wheel spacing, mine used to do that but adjusted the spacing and she ran grand till the other problem above started.

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Check the wheel spacing, mine used to do that but adjusted the spacing and she ran grand till the other problem above started.

 

Thanks for the advice, it's working well now.

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I bought a Flying Scotsman 10 years ago, and the photo was of a superb looking thing altogether. What turned up was a mess, with the front bogie hanging off like a dislodged testicle.

 

I pretty much put that in the feedback, and oddly enough, he wasn't keen to rectify the issue. It's still in a "dysfunction" state :(

I'm sorry lads,I know this I kind of old but this just cracks me up

I laughed so much I broke ventus!

Edited by GSR 800

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Hi all,

 

I submitted the text below to New Irish Lines which Alan kindly published in the previous issue, however it's also of interest to this group as well, I'm sure.

 

The article in NiL in Volume 7, No.3 included a very interesting article on coaches transferred to the NCC. Reference was included to LMS coaches volume 3 by Jenkinson and Essery which includes the diagram numbers and scale drawings for some of the coaches transferred to the NCC as a result of the loss of coaches in the war. I've managed to obtain a copy of this via the interlibrary lending service and it does include some drawings and details of these all third vehicles. The thought occurred that these vehicles would be a straightforward NCC vehicle to model based on the various versions of Airfix/Dapol/Mainline or Hornby LMS coach.

 

The one that seems to match is Hornby all third R4657 to diagram 1906A (the a appears to refer to whether the compartments were smoking or not so doesn't indicate any particular difference to the bodyshell). Hornby released this model in early 2015 and whilst it is pricey, at £35 - 40 it would appear to be perfect for the role of modelling NCC No's 169, 170, 183-189, 194-197.

 

A review of 'Diesel Dawn' would appear to indicate that 188 of this batch was rebuilt as MPD trailer 535 and 195 was rebuilt as MPD trailer 536 so they had a long life - there's a couple of photos on page 143 and in colour 173.

 

Does anyone have any decent photos of these vehicles at any point in their service career from which we can glean a few livery clues? I guess when first transferred it may have been as simple as adding NCC to the LMS, and later they'd have gone into UTA green as part of their career in MED's

 

Cheers for now.

 

Richard.

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I haven't got comprehensive livery details per livery but what I can say is this:

 

1. At least one LMS "transplant" simply had its new NCC number roughly painted over its old LMS one, but otherwise ran briefly in rather tired looking LMS livery until repainted UTA green. I don't know its identity but I've seen a picture of it.

 

2. NCC livery per se had distinct differences from LMS livery in Britain. Leaving aside detail differences on locomotives and wagons for now, and sticking to carriages, in post-war times most NCC coaches newly painted (and there weren't that many!) had no lining if they were of older designs. This also applied to narrow gauge stock.

 

3. In later NCC period in general, there was no LMS crest applied. Some earlier stock shows no sign of crests either.

 

4. Lettering was always "LMS NCC" rather than just "LMS" as on British examples.

 

5. Obviously, standard LMS shade maroon was always used, and where lining was applied it conformed to normal English LMS patterns.

 

6. It is probable that most of the stuff brought in after the war from England, therefore, was plain maroon with LMS NCC markings and number in standard NCC style, and no lining. I cannot say that there weren't exeptions - there may have been - but before a couple of years had passed, they were being repainted into UTA green as fast as they could anyhow.

 

Hope that's helpful.

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There's a picture in Nigel Mundy's collection of 385 (ex-184) taken at Antrim 28/10/67. UTA green, opposite side to the one in Des Coakham's book. No horizontal stripe apparent, just numbers and symbol.

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Generally, the UTA applied a single line along the waist of one inch straw coloured line thinly edged both sides in red to loco hauled coaches.

 

No railcars ever had this lining. They were plain green. But a few loco hauled coaches didn't have lining either.

 

Incidentally, this is not to be confused with the yellow (not straw) and separate red lines used by the RPSI. This was purposely designed (by meself, if truth be told) to look UTA-esque but not be exact, as none of the RPSI's Whitehead set ever ran in UTA livery.

Edited by jhb171achill

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I haven't got comprehensive livery details per livery but what I can say is this:

 

1. At least one LMS "transplant" simply had its new NCC number roughly painted over its old LMS one, but otherwise ran briefly in rather tired looking LMS livery until repainted UTA green. I don't know its identity but I've seen a picture of it.

 

2. NCC livery per se had distinct differences from LMS livery in Britain. Leaving aside detail differences on locomotives and wagons for now, and sticking to carriages, in post-war times most NCC coaches newly painted (and there weren't that many!) had no lining if they were of older designs. This also applied to narrow gauge stock.

 

3. In later NCC period in general, there was no LMS crest applied. Some earlier stock shows no sign of crests either.

 

4. Lettering was always "LMS NCC" rather than just "LMS" as on British examples.

 

5. Obviously, standard LMS shade maroon was always used, and where lining was applied it conformed to normal English LMS patterns.

 

6. It is probable that most of the stuff brought in after the war from England, therefore, was plain maroon with LMS NCC markings and number in standard NCC style, and no lining. I cannot say that there weren't exeptions - there may have been - but before a couple of years had passed, they were being repainted into UTA green as fast as they could anyhow.

 

Hope that's helpful.

 

There is a picture of ex LMS coach 14102 still in LMS livery in 1950, in Mark Kennedy's 'The LMS in Ireland' on P79. It carries the NCC number 24. Ratio Kits do a model kit of this exact coach, which also happens to be exactly the same as NCC number 25. Apart from the bogies, the picture in the book is exactly what the Ratio kit looks like, but at some point, under the UTA, all the beading below the top waist beading was removed. The ends were also replaced with straight matchboarded ends.

These coaches were built in 1908, purchased from BR in 1948, and were still in service in 1964. The official withdrawal date is not known to me.

Edited by Dhu Varren

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There is a picture of ex LMS coach 14102 still in LMS livery in 1950, in Mark Kennedy's 'The LMS in Ireland' on P79. It carries the NCC number 24. Ratio Kits do a model kit of this exact coach, which also happens to be exactly the same as NCC number 25. Apart from the bogies, the picture in the book is exactly what the Ratio kit looks like, but at some point, under the UTA, all the beading below the top waist beading was removed. The ends were also replaced with straight matchboarded ends.

These coaches were built in 1908, purchased from BR in 1948, and were still in service in 1964. The official withdrawal date is not known to me.

 

There is a picture in Desmond Coakham's 'Irish Broad Gauge Carriages' on P94 of NCC number 24 after the rebuild mentioned above, but in UTA green. There is also, on P93 a picture of NCC number 22 in rebuilt form, but still in LMS livery. The kit produced by Ratio for an all 1st coach is almost identical to number 22, and certainly would be a suitable donor for an NCC/UTA version.

The sides for Ratio coaches used to be, and maybe still are, available on their own for cut & shut projects. Just contact Ratio direct.

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The UTA had a habit of re-panelling older coaches, particularly of NCC origin, with flat sheets of plywood, later aluminium sheeting. This resulted in many carriages losing their distinctive style of beading once "UTA-ised" and repainted green. In the 1960s, this included round-cornered windows with rubber sealed surrounds, like several the RPSI got.

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There is a picture in Desmond Coakham's 'Irish Broad Gauge Carriages' on P94 of NCC number 24 after the rebuild mentioned above, but in UTA green. There is also, on P93 a picture of NCC number 22 in rebuilt form, but still in LMS livery. The kit produced by Ratio for an all 1st coach is almost identical to number 22, and certainly would be a suitable donor for an NCC/UTA version.

The sides for Ratio coaches used to be, and maybe still are, available on their own for cut & shut projects. Just contact Ratio direct.

 

Thanks for the replies, all! I've a copy of the LMS in Ireland, one of the Midland Railway Ratio kits is added to my birthday list....!

 

Richard.

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Roco D214. G class anyone? Remove the railing and modify the cab slightly.

51144A.jpg

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Roco D214. G class anyone? Remove the railing and modify the cab slightly.

[ATTACH=CONFIG]28133[/ATTACH]

 

To add some clarity to your post roxy, the wheelbase of that model is 28.8mm,which looks roughly right, but I've no definite data. It would make the g class about 7 ft and change.

 

The length of the chassis, which is die cast, is 83mm. G class works out at 84ish.

 

That's the good news. Bad news is that anything above the solebar is way off prototype and wouldn't look like a g class, no matter the amount of 2 foot rules you apply.

 

Sadly, I'm not aware of any drawings of the G in circulation to aid scratchbuild in, but if I dig any out, I'll add them to the resources section here.

 

Richie.

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Posted (edited)

I suppose it depends and how you look at it. To my eye it's not far off. The chassis and hood are close enough for me to take a punt on one and get out the spray paint.

 

Deutz-green-Edit.jpg

Edited by roxyguy

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Well you've seen my stuff, total rivet counter, but I'd be whipping off the cab and bonnet and rebuilding it right. To my eye the bonnet on the donor is too short and the cab too long, but Rule 1 always applies. It's your ****ing railway and you can run what you ****ing well like!

 

As long as you don't get modellers remorse at some stage, wish you'd gone the extra mile for a prototypical model, or don't try and pass it off as a perfect representation, then it's all good. Rule 1 after all... 

 

But you bring a valid donor to this thread, and lads searching Google for the same idea in time might be pop in here and be able to pick up those models for a few schillings. It's about 40ish years old, after all.

 

R

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