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Macmine Junction

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Wexford Model Railway Club are pleased to introduce their latest OO club layout: Macmine Junction. The layout was developed primarily by John Walker who has produced many scratch-built Irish OO layouts over the years including Ballinagee, Ballyconbeg, Rathmichael and many more. John was ably assisted by club members David Bryan, Gareth Lloyd and others. Macmine Junction will make its public exhibition debut at the Easter Exhibition at St Joseph's Community Centre, Wexford Town (27th and 28th March 2016).

 

The prototype junction was in Co Wexford between Wexford Town and Enniscorthy. It provided a link between the Dublin-Wexford line and New Ross/Waterford and Kilkenny/Carlow via Palace East. It was a remote site with no adjacent village and was situated directly beside the Slaney river. The buildings were typically sparce design however the rail set-up was elaborate with no less than 10 turn-outs (points) enabling run-arounds and passing trains to swap passengers. A small goods facility was also provided. The junction was closed in the early 1960s and almost nothing remains bar the single line running to Wexford from Enniscorthy.

 

The following photos show how well the scene has been captured by the model. I include some with no rolling stock to show the overall layout. Also included are shots of the layout with some steam era rolling stock borrowed from Ballybeg.

 

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Edited by Irishrailwayman

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That looks amazing:) what sort of locos have you got there. I see woolies, but I saw an 0-6-0 and maybe even a 4-4-0. I will follow this layout with interest..

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What a delightful layout that captures the era perfectly. At a quick glance the rolling stock jumps out at me, especially the Rank wagons, (in Red & Grey livery) and the Horsebox. Could you provide some information on how they were built please?

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That looks amazing:) what sort of locos have you got there. I see woolies, but I saw an 0-6-0 and maybe even a 4-4-0. I will follow this layout with interest..

 

The three Moguls are the Murphy Models products extensively detailed while the CIE Class J5 0-6-0 No 625 is an adapted Hornby BR Fowler Class 4F and the CIE Class D2 4-4-0 No 327 is an adapted Hornby BR Class 2P.

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What a delightful layout that captures the era perfectly. At a quick glance the rolling stock jumps out at me, especially the Rank wagons, (in Red & Grey livery) and the Horsebox. Could you provide some information on how they were built please?

 

The Ranks Ireland wagons are card kits from Alphagraphix (CC471) with spare detailing from Presflo kits on Peco Wonderful Wagon chassis; the horsebox (with groom's accommodation and dog box) is another card kit from Alphagraphix (CC468) again on Peco chassis (includes sprung buffers and axle boxes)...

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Well done lads,the layout looks great,lots of operations potential there.

You have really captured the feel of the area.

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Just beautiful and highly evocative!

 

What turntable is that? Is that bridge scratch built? Stunning!

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A very nice layout. Well done to the team. Scenic work is top class. What are the dimensions of the layout?

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Just beautiful and highly evocative!

 

What turntable is that? Is that bridge scratch built? Stunning!

 

To John Walker's eternal credit, every item on the actual layout, including the painted backscene, is scratch-built! The rolling stock shown above is from my collection built over many years for Ballybeg (some detailed rtr or kit built).

Edited by Irishrailwayman

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To John Walker's eternal credit' date=' every item on the actual layout, including the painted backscene, is done scratch-built! The rolling stock shown above is from my collection built over many years for Ballybeg (some detailed rtr or kit built).[/quote'] wow in both regards!

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That is absolutely top class - very atmospheric! Well done to all. Hope to see it some time!

 

Everyone is invited to the Wexford Model Railway Club/St Joseph's Community Centre Easter Exhibition (27th & 28th March) to view model railway (and other hobby exhibits) including Macmine Junction, Rathmichael (again by John Walker & co), Joseph's Bridge (John again), Ballybeg (moi) etc. Full details will be posted shortly in the Whats On section of IRM!

Edited by Irishrailwayman

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A very nice layout. Well done to the team. Scenic work is top class. What are the dimensions of the layout?

 

Thanks Noel,

 

The scenic part of the layout is in three sections each 4 foot by 2 feet giving a 12 foot total length. A separate loop around fiddle yard at the back is in development although the fiddle yard used with Rathmichael will work also for Macmine Junction.

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very nice, layout

 

my grandmother ( now passed away ) related a few times how they always went to Dublin from Waterford via Macmine junction as it brought then in or the harcourt line which was much more convenient. She could never understand the change to going through Kilkenny !!!

 

funny how , we used to be able to cross the altantic at twice the speed of sound, reach space in a reusable multi purposes vehicle and , and have good public transport

 

" progress " is a funny thing

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True. And wood fired steam engines, if we had them, would use renewable energy.......

 

You're mixing up 'sustainable' and 'renewable' now, JB! :P

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The Ranks Ireland wagons are card kits from Alphagraphix (CC471) with spare detailing from Presflo kits on Peco Wonderful Wagon chassis; the horsebox (with groom's accommodation and dog box) is another card kit from Alphagraphix (CC468) again on Peco chassis (includes sprung buffers and axle boxes)...

 

Many thanks for the information, the detailing on them makes the difference, well done.

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Many thanks for the information, the detailing on them makes the difference, well done.

 

The card kits are really easy to make: just cut out the printed parts on the cards provided, use card glue to mount them on spare backing card (most fine art stores will supply off-cuts at low cost), glue sections together and mount onto a suitable chassis. A matt or satin varnish will preserve the model. It is surprising how strong the card models are and durable (I made some of mine over 10 years ago). One word of warning: the colours will fade if the model is left in strong sunlight!

 

Card kits are a great way to get low cost models of Irish prototypes which are unlikely to ever be available commercially and Alphagraphix have a big selection in both 4mm and 7mm.

Edited by Irishrailwayman

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In the 1960's a fleet of new diesel locomotives sweep all steam engines off the railways in Ireland. Here at Macmine Junction the variety of goods being carried is reducing. B101 in green livery has charge of the Waterford goods while C230 in silver livery shunts the yard where cattle are being unloaded. Meanwhile, A20 in green livery has charge of the Wexford afternoon passenger train. B121in grey/yellow livery waits on the turntable in case it is needed...

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Now that's what a railway SHOULD look like! Ye can keep your railcars!

 

Good to see accurate rendition of both the earlier dark green and the later lighter green, especially the darker on the A; only a very few got this treatment, the vast bulk of them being the lighter green like B101. (I believe A46 was the first dark green A, and there were only 2 or 3 others in dark green; maybe they found old paint, because when any "A"'s were repainted from initial silver, the dark green livery was by now only used on buses - anything green on the railway was the lighter colour).

 

Also, a very typical feature of the period which I don't think I've seen on a model before is the older wooden coach in the pre-1955 dark green with full light green lining, along with newer carriages in the post-1955 mid green with simplified light green lining.

 

It's easy to see how "odd", and "foreign" the new 121s seemed in that setting.

 

cattle trucks everywhere - absolutely standard in those days, and almost obligatory for a late 50s / early 60s CIE layout - as are "C" class locos.

 

Excellent work.

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Magnifique

 

Absolutely totally and utterly stunning.

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I really like the portrayal of the cows in their field. Are they small, or far away....?

 

John Walker tells me that the black and white cattle I have being unloaded did not appear on Irish farms until much later. Seemingly, all cattle back then were either black with some white faces or red in colour. Out with my black matt paint to change those cattle...

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John Walker tells me that the black and white cattle I have being unloaded did not appear on Irish farms until much later. Seemingly, all cattle back then were either black with some white faces or red in colour. Out with my black matt paint to change those cattle...

 

That's something I've heard before and I suppose it relates to accuracy in general of stuff at the lineside. For example, there can't be a single vehicle ever ran with shiny tyres, but I've yet to see one with weathered or muddy tyres on a vehicle on a layout!

 

I remember reading an article somewhere years ago where things like the correct form of gutters, corrugated iron roofs, street lights and things like that were discussed. Doesn't sound like something that too many of us would have high on our agendas, but it's surprising what a difference it makes if anyone takes the time (which we don't all have!) to do it....

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Dead skinny dexters and Kerry cows would be the right cattle for that era. Take it from a culchie;)

Edited by GSR 800
Dexterity instead of dexters

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John Walker tells me that the black and white cattle I have being unloaded did not appear on Irish farms until much later. Seemingly, all cattle back then were either black with some white faces or red in colour. Out with my black matt paint to change those cattle...

Most of the traditional irish breeds would have been

Dexters (small stocky black, red)

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Kerry (larger, black)

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Some Moiled Cattle (red & white)

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Herefords also seem to be relatively common(red) but more recent I think. Occasional Jersey hanging around homesteads but much rarer.

Friesians (black & white) are a newer breed. Somebody with a more intensive farming background may be able to oblige with timing details.

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