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daryl43068

Daryl's Workbench

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Hi All,

 

Been a member of the forum for a while, but thought I would share my first Irish project, a Mk1 GSV. The finished model will be of 3188, as like the model it lacks raised window frames. The model started of life as a Bachmann Mk1 BSK that I picked up second hand in my local model shop,

 

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To create the door, I cut out the door window area, and fitted it to the existing passenger window hole, (an idea copied from Popeye on here while researching GSVs, Thanks for that! :tumbsup:)

 

25021838604_45576e5420_c.jpg

 

 

The bodyside grille was created from Evergreen clapboard, and a thin styrene strip to create the dividing bar. I'm not 100% about it and may swap for an etched version,

 

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I've also started making the exhaust cover/ port on the roof,

 

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And the fuel(?) tank underneath. The steps are made from various styrene strips and angles,

 

25559690141_18c1f19408_c.jpg

 

 

Thats all for now :)

 

Cheers

 

Daryl

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Great to see more lads bashing, hacking, and bending stock to their will! The clapboard will end up black, you'll be lucky to see the grooves in either brass or styrene, so I wouldn't stress. Good stuff Daryl. Richie

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Thanks all for the positive comments! Really inspiring to do more, which I have done today.

 

I've finished detailing the fuel tanks.

 

25377201230_6596301727_c.jpg

 

 

And to fill in the windows I placed a bit of plasticard behind the windows...

 

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... and filled in the holes with plasticard, reducing the amount of filler needed. The windows and doors have since had there first bit of filler applied.

 

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I've also added a pipe that sticks out the roof near the big vent,

 

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And removed all the end details bar the lamp brackets.

 

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In the next few days I will get round to the sanding down the filler and applying more where needed.

 

Thanks again for the positive comments!

 

Cheers

 

Daryl

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Well done Daryl, turning inexpensive models into what you want them to be. Watching your posts with interest. Mike

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Thanks again for all the positive comments! :tumbsup:

 

Been doing a bit more, Footsteps are now added under the 'new' door, from some styrene angle. The door will be scribed into the plastic once all the filling and sanding has been completed.

 

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Starting to get there! I've picked up some LMS suspended gangways today at a local model show. I will probably paint the end door orange first, fit the gangway, then mask the orange before painting the rest of the coach.

 

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I've fitted Replica Railway's B5 bogies to the model, with minimal surgery. Bogie wise, the coupling was removed, and on the coach, the bogie pivots drilled out to 4.8mm and some plastic removed to allow the bogie to clip in. I forgot to take pictures of that bit but if anyone is interested I can take some more to explain better. Bachmann do a B4 bogie, which is visually very similar to a B5 (the horizonal bar is thicker on a B5) but I personally like the 'beefy-ness' of Replica's bogie.

 

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I've also added the water filler pipe recesses on the bodysides, and a small hole drilled and wire inserted.

 

25103760854_641cb08fbb_c.jpg

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Cheers!

 

Daryl

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Tremendous work! You've really captured the look of these vehicles so far.

Ok so maybe I'm being unrealistic, but given the level of detail you've put it into the exterior, you should give doing a basic interior a go!

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Cheers! :tumbsup: I am on the hunt for interior photos, I think there is a water tank at each end, and an engine in the middle and a guard somewhere!

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I'm a volunteer at DCDR and we have one of these vans in regular use. I'll sort you out with interior layout shots on thursday!

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Thanks again chaps! The coach has been primed, nothing special just a rattle can from Halfords, to show any areas that need further work.

 

Below shows some more filler is needed on the middle doors.

 

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The ends of the coach need some more filler in places. The lip above the gangway door is where the roof slots in, keeping the coach square. There is a slight gap, which I will fill best I can with some styrene strip. I wont be able to fully remove the join, as this would prevent access to inside the coach in the future.

 

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Cheers,

 

Daryl

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Well done Daryl, With this type of modelling it's a case of filling & sanding, filling & sanding, filling .... Until you get a finish you are happy with. Keep at it.

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Here are 3 pic's i took at DCDR of the GSV, this might help with details & weathering.

 

GSV 1..jpg

 

GSV 2..jpg

 

GSV 3..jpg

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They certainly get around, these steam heat vans. I spotted one a couple of years ago at Boat of Garten on the Strathspey Railway in the North of Scotland, resplendent in IR tippex livery.

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That van is vacuum braked, but has through piping for air brakes. This stems from its days in use on the Cork Postal liner, which was formed of TPO and BR van, plus 60' air braked flats loaded with containers. The coaches were marshalled at the front, and the loco would have both air and vac brake connections hooked up.

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What does Air/Vacuum Transfer mean on the TLA? Equipped to run with vacuum and airbraked stock?

 

On withdrawal from active passenger train services with IE GSV 3189 was used for a period for stock transfers between Heuston sidings and Inchicore,

The GSV could haul empty Mk2 and Mk3 coaches to and from those locations for the purpose of exams or overhauls.

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That van is vacuum braked, but has through piping for air brakes. This stems from its days in use on the Cork Postal liner, which was formed of TPO and BR van, plus 60' air braked flats loaded with containers. The coaches were marshalled at the front, and the loco would have both air and vac brake connections hooked up.

Thanks for that, UP. Do you know roughly when that would have been? Obviously the TPO had to be through-piped also. Seems an odd arrangement, TPO and liner.

 

On withdrawal from active passenger train services with IE GSV 3189 was used for a period for stock transfers between Heuston sidings and Inchicore,

The GSV could haul empty Mk2 and Mk3 coaches to and from those locations for the purpose of exams or overhauls.

That would make sense and I presume the sign was added to the side of the van at that time?

Why would a brake have been required at all on an empty stock transfer? Was it capable/required to provide light/heat to the stock once at Inchicore?

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That would make sense and I presume the sign was added to the side of the van at that time? Why would a brake have been required at all on an empty stock transfer? Was it capable/required to provide light/heat to the stock once at Inchicore? Yes the wording was added at that time, A brake was required due to the steep gradient between Heuston and Inchicore known as the gullet, No the GSV wasn't required to provide any power to any empty coaches at Inchicore. It was just used to provide brake force to the coaches.

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Hi All,

 

Many thanks for the background information, always nice to know background knowledge about a project! Not been able to do much recently, but a trip to an automotive paint supplier today means I got some orange mixed into an aerosol can. It's RAL 2011, which is the shade used on the Mk3s, not sure if its the same shade on the GSV or not. I've tested a bit on my scrap coach I use for testing paint etc. Its applied to a white primer and is positioned next to a Murphy's Craven.

 

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It looks a tad bright to me, hopefully will tone down with a bit of weathering, unless I've got the wrong shade! And I do apologise for the terrible light. I should point out I'm modelling the coach around 2005, so the last few years of mainline service.

 

In other business, the coach has been through various stages of filling and sanding, and should hopefully be ready for paintig in the not so distant future!

 

Cheers

 

Daryl.

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White primer affects the colour of the top coat. I suggest always spraying onto grey primer when spraying your orange/tan.

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That shade looks ok. If you give it a bit of thinned brown paint and take most of it off again it should dull it down a bit.

The longer you leave the brown on the more it will stay on.

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White primer affects the colour of the top coat. I suggest always spraying onto grey primer when spraying your orange/tan.

 

Cheers David, Fortunately my paint coach had some grey primer already on it, so this is the grey side,

 

25828473516_f3bd229d4b_c.jpg

 

 

That shade looks ok. If you give it a bit of thinned brown paint and take most of it off again it should dull it down a bit.

The longer you leave the brown on the more it will stay on.

 

Thanks Popeye, I was planning a weathering wash. I have been looking at various pictures of Irish stock in the mid 2000s, and it seems every coach is different.

 

The orange does pretty much match a Murphy 071. It must be one of those things, peoples interpretations, how the camera takes the picture, computer screen etc.

 

Cheers

 

Daryl

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Hi Daryl,

To be honest the shades of orange look completely different to me and heated discussions have occurred on the site before on this issue. While we seem to be agreed on 40 shades for green, orange seems to be a whole new sticking point. It seems clear that the various shades of orange on the prototypes changed with the livery but it has also been intimated that CIE/IR/IE may not have adhered religiously to a definite shade during any livery period. Notwithstanding the confounders that lighting and weathering of the prototype introduce, basically the test coach appears to be much closer to the Supertrain livery especially when faded/weathered that the much brighter IR livery which is what I think may on that Craven. In any case while the test coach seem to be nearer the flash there is a stark contrast between between the coaches. Remember that there are two orange shade of MM 071 class locomotive floating about as there was on the prototypes. The 071 has a duller more tan shade when originally delivered by GM as seen on MM0088 and the Supertrain was subsequently applied which was a more orange shade at least when new, represented on the MM locos as MM0086

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