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Georgeconna

EASA Protoytpe Rules could Decimate RC flying. Covering Drones and Aircraft.

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Hi all,

 

Prototype document on possible future rules on RC Drone and Aircraft is linked below.

 

Should these come in then this will end the RC Journey for Myself with Draconian rules and Regs for Hobbiests like myself. Some may even say this clears the Skies for the big guns like Amazon and other delivery drone systems that may come about in the future. :(

 

 

Page 14 withing the EASA link defines the Categories where your Models may fall into.

 

https://www.easa.europa.eu/system/files/dfu/UAS%20Prototype%20Regulation%20final.pdf

 

for those that prefer Video

 

 

My Stuff will come into Cat A3 so In effect if this come in all the stuff I have will be illegal to fly and will be defunct.

 

 

UA operations in subcategory A3 shall:

(a) be performed with a class 3 UAS placed on the market:

(1) complying with the product requirements defined in Appendix I.5;

(2) displaying the CE marking and the class 3 identification label on the UA in a visible

and practical manner; and

(3) that has not been modified in a way that breaches compliance with the requirements in

Appendix I.5;

(b) be conducted:

(1) up to a height of 150 m (500 ft) above ground level, unless otherwise determined by

the competent authority for the operational area based on airspace considerations;

(2) within a range such that the remote pilot, or a UA observer who is situated within the

VLOS of the remote pilot, maintains VLOS; clear and effective communication shall

be established between the remote pilot and the UA observer;

(3) with a minimum horizontal distance of 20 m from uninvolved persons if flying a

rotorcraft, or 50 m otherwise; and

(4) with active and up-to-date geofencing and electronic identification systems;

© and be carried out by a remote pilot:

(1) being at least 14 years old;

(2) carrying evidence of the competence achieved after having received training provided

by training service providers in general knowledge of aviation and airspace, principles

of operation of UA, risk management, ethical airmanship, data protection, privacy

protection and environmental protection according to standards or alternative

qualifications accepted by EASA;

(3) having the appropriate familiarisation or practical training to minimise the risk to third

parties in the specific conditions and operational environment, following best

practices.

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Some of that, at least, applies in the UK, I believe the height limit here is 400ft agl.

 

I have a drone correspondent - I will ask him.

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Yes Nelson, the UK is currently an EASA member so I assume it should apply in the UK. A lot of that already applies to RC aircraft. I think they need to make a distinction between RC aircraft(drones) fitted with camera feed and those without. This is a crucial difference due to the likelihood of them being flown irresponsibly beyond line of sight.

 

I also think that big signs similar to those on cigarettes should be applied to the packaging of drones to indicate that flying beyond line of sight is illegal and may lead to imprisonment.

 

I occasionally fly a Cessna and if I ever have a close encounter with a drone I shall be circling it and directing police to it's operator if possible. It's only a matter of time until drone collision causes death.

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The current situation is that any drone over 1Kg ( which infact basically includes any RC model at all) must be registered . IN ireland it has always been illegal to engage in " first person flying". Now EASA, has begun a process, where all remote first person flying , is now defined as RPAS ( remotely piloted aircraft systems ) and in essence forbids them to move outside the visual range of an on-ground observer

 

The safety aspect of a register is entirely suspect, as those drones that are setting out to cause trouble , will by definition , not be registered and hence unidentifiable, whereas reasonable operators , operating as they have always done , within the bounds of visual distance and the provisions of the "model aircraft and rocket Act " are having their liberties infringed for an activity that has a tremendous safety record

 

It should be noted that this EASA document is only a " discussion " document. and there is a proposed 3 year grandfather clause for existing model aircraft. so given the typical delays , its could be 5 years before the regulations are applied. ( if not changed in the mean time)

 

Some of the requirements are clearly nonsense , ( such as transmission of IDs, ( no technical data given ) ) and requirements that aircraft fail without causing damage ( hmm , its falling from the sky )

 

It should be noted that the directive while aimed at drones covers all model aircraft , Im sure certain elements of the RC fraternity , will be " delighted " in having to place a " drone" category certification mark, on the body of their Mk2 spitfire !!!!!

Edited by Junctionmad

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My correspondent concurs - much the same regs here.

 

There's all sorts of stuff in the air now that wasn't there years ago.

 

The Chinese Lantern craze seems to have faded, but I've seen those at well over a thousand feet on occasions.

 

And big kites are popular round here, often many hundreds of feet up. We do have daily military helicopter visits and the odd air ambulance event, plus the coppers seem to get a spin in their chopper most days.

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This video -

 

 

- is suggesting much more draconian limits than mentioned above.

 

Click the blue button to watch direct in Vimeo.

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The current situation is that any drone over 1Kg ( which infact basically includes any RC model at all) must be registered . IN ireland it has always been illegal to engage in " first person flying". Now EASA, has begun a process, where all remote first person flying , is now defined as RPAS ( remotely piloted aircraft systems ) and in essence forbids them to move outside the visual range of an on-ground observer

 

The safety aspect of a register is entirely suspect, as those drones that are setting out to cause trouble , will by definition , not be registered and hence unidentifiable, whereas reasonable operators , operating as they have always done , within the bounds of visual distance and the provisions of the "model aircraft and rocket Act " are having their liberties infringed for an activity that has a tremendous safety record

 

It should be noted that this EASA document is only a " discussion " document. and there is a proposed 3 year grandfather clause for existing model aircraft. so given the typical delays , its could be 5 years before the regulations are applied. ( if not changed in the mean time)

 

Some of the requirements are clearly nonsense , ( such as transmission of IDs, ( no technical data given ) ) and requirements that aircraft fail without causing damage ( hmm , its falling from the sky )

 

It should be noted that the directive while aimed at drones covers all model aircraft , Im sure certain elements of the RC fraternity , will be " delighted " in having to place a " drone" category certification mark, on the body of their Mk2 spitfire !!!!!

 

 

 

Drones are the issue that has most likely started this as you can fly them almost anyhwere but the Regs will cover all unmanned Flights including aircraft which in all fairness rarely hit the dizzying height of 500ft. Most Aircraft flying are from Prepared fields and Full Size most likely would be aware and clubs have rules and such. Killer if this does get implemented.

 

I have a done myself. I flew it 3 times, Does nothing for me. Planes much more fun.

 

Yep a CE mark on a Spit just wont look right!

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. . .

I have a done myself. I flew it 3 times, Does nothing for me. Planes much more fun.

 

Yep a CE mark on a Spit just wont look right!

 

Hi George. I agree - planes over drones any day. I've been an RC pilot for over 40 years and like you I also have a drone, but it doesn't blow my skirt up. MACI (Model Aeronautics Council of Ireland) , or other RC flight insurance cover is essential. These proposed measures are preposterous. Flying large scale RC planes (eg: 9-12ft wingspan) one would regularly fly higher than 1000ft AGL. But never breech controlled airspace. Down here in Co Wicklow the zone starts at 4000ft above sea level, so little chance of an RC model breeching that. I can appreciate the need to protect civilian air transport inside controlled airspace, and especially airport control zones and approach patterns, but some of these proposals seem bonkers. Noel

 

PS: I flirted with model choppers for a few years, but the noise got to me. A real challenge to fly especially in the era before yaw gyros were invented.

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Hi George. I agree - planes over drones any day. I've been an RC pilot for over 40 years and like you I also have a drone, but it doesn't blow my skirt up. MACI (Model Aeronautics Council of Ireland) , or other RC flight insurance cover is essential. These proposed measures are preposterous. Flying large scale RC planes (eg: 9-12ft wingspan) one would regularly fly higher than 1000ft AGL. But never breech controlled airspace. Down here in Co Wicklow the zone starts at 4000ft above sea level, so little chance of an RC model breeching that. I can appreciate the need to protect civilian air transport inside controlled airspace, and especially airport control zones and approach patterns, but some of these proposals seem bonkers. Noel

 

PS: I flirted with model choppers for a few years, but the noise got to me. A real challenge to fly especially in the era before yaw gyros were invented.

 

 

Noel, In ireland , its illegal to fly any model aircraft above 400 feet. ( full stop)

 

The EASA rules while targeting drones , have not been able to define a Model aircraft , as distinct to a drone and hence , ALL RC ( and tethered ) models will fall under the proposed stipulations. There are vague suggestions that a form of " blanket " approval would be issued to model clubs , but then all you would have is drone operators joining clubs.

 

The provisions are a license to create an unregulated " underground " industry of RC modellers, they are absolute rubbish

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its worth pointing out that the Article 15 provisions in essence exempt those flying under the auspices of a nationally recognised ( and regulated ) model aircraft clubs, These "proposed" regulations only affect non club members. Given the attitude of the MCAI ( and its insurance), that means most drone flyers

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its worth pointing out that the Article 15 provisions in essence exempt those flying under the auspices of a nationally recognised ( and regulated ) model aircraft clubs, These "proposed" regulations only affect non club members. Given the attitude of the MACI ( and its insurance), that means most drone flyers

 

One of the main benefits of MACI membership is the insurance and being able to fly at approved flying areas. Not worth the hassle of having an accident which involves people or property anymore. Sadly a loss will need to occur before people realise the threat that carelessly flown model aircraft can bring, drones or not

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its worth pointing out that the Article 15 provisions in essence exempt those flying under the auspices of a nationally recognised ( and regulated ) model aircraft clubs, These "proposed" regulations only affect non club members. Given the attitude of the MCAI ( and its insurance), that means most drone flyers

 

And a good thing too. I don't think it will change much for typical MACI affiliated club members with insurance, who carry out responsible RC flying (fixed wing or choppers), as most folks only fly from club sites as long as I can remember going back to the 70s. It will rightly bring a much needed degree of regulatory and safety control over lone drone operators. I say drone 'operators' rather than 'flyers' as drones require little flying skill compared to RC aircraft.

 

It doesn't seem that many years ago since we as MACI members were invited to perform RC displays at Baldonnel airshows only 100s of meters away from operational full size aircraft. All fully controlled, briefed and safety rehearsed days beforehand, but looking back it seems a little casual. We had two giant model 'toffee' bombers that used to drop sweats with tiny parachute streamers over the crowd line! RC models have also got much larger and heavier than 20 years ago with 8-12ft wingspan giant scale models not uncommon. One of those out of control is a much greater safety risk to the public than a DJI Phantom drone.

 

The days of parking a car in the country side, climbing over the gate and launching a toy model aircraft from a farmers field is long gone, just as launching a DJI Phantom from a public green space, or urban space, except for licensed and certified professionals.

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