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Class 121

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Revised 121 class DCC sound demo (as requested) without a musical backing track. Demonstrates some of the specific sound functions. The one function I forgot to record was heavy notching and trashing as a heavy trains slowly accelerates from stationary. The LokSound project is by http://wheeltappersdccsounds.co.uk who do all the Irish sound projects for DCkits. I bought my 141/181 decoders direct from Wheeltappers. I will also be getting my existing ESU/MM 071 sound chips re-blown by 'wheeltappers' so I can get 'PowerDrive' mode, control over notching and the extra functions. Enjoy

This LokSound V4 project has 'PowerDrive' capability (i.e. ESU FullThrottle mode) which allows coasting/braking and switching between automatic and manual control of notching. F5 can be used to 'lock' the loco at whatever its current speeds is, including stationary, and throttle control then only controls notching sounds. F5 can be toggled iteratively on/off to simulate heavy trains starting off with poor acceleration causing engine thrashing, and likewise coasting at speed and to simulate long distance braking at idle.

 

Edited by Noel
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1 hour ago, Noel said:

Revised 121 class DCC sound demo (as requested) without a musical backing track. Demonstrates some of the specific sound functions. The one function I forgot to record was heavy notching and trashing as a heavy trains slowly accelerates from stationary. The LokSound project is by http://wheeltappersdccsounds.co.uk who do all the Irish sound projects for DCkits. I bought my 141/181 decoders direct from Wheeltappers. I will also be getting my existing ESU/MM 071 sound chips re-blown by 'wheeltappers' so I can get 'PowerDrive' mode, control over notching and the extra functions. Enjoy

This LokSound V4 project has 'PowerDrive' capability (i.e. ESU FullThrottle mode) which allows coasting/braking and switching between automatic and manual control of notching. F5 can be used to 'lock' the loco at whatever its current speeds is, including stationary, and throttle control then only controls notching sounds. F5 can be toggled iteratively on/off to simulate heavy trains starting off with poor acceleration causing engine thrashing, and likewise coasting at speed and to simulate long distance braking at idle.

 

There was a recent firmware update for the V4 decoders which improved the independent brake function. The deceleration value for the brake is now controlled though CV179 (I think, have to doublecheck!). Previously this CV was for the dynamic brake function. You can now set you the loco's deceleration to maximum (255) and coast until you apply the brake to stop the train.

To use this you would need to get Wheeltappers to ensure the firmware is updated. Although this is done automatically when uploading a soundfile.

If you're planning to have a lot of ESU decoders in your fleet I strongly recommend getting the Lokprogrammer. You can do all these adjustments yourself as well as creating and modifying soundfiles. ESU are constantly adding to their library of US loco soundfiles and even now you can have a different engine sound in each of your locos.

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Thanks for info Graham @irishthump. If one got a LokProgrammer I know all the engine prime mover recordings are available on the ESU website (eg EMD 567, 645, etc), but where would one source sound files for things like Irish loco horns, flange squeal, brakes, guards whistles, buffer clash, coupling noises, coach door slamming, etc?

 

Edited by Noel

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Half Expecting the drivers window to slide shut when the train sounds the whistle.

 

Edited by Georgeconna
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1 hour ago, Noel said:

the Thanks for info Graham @irishthump. If one got a LokProgrammer I know all the engine prime mover recordings are available on the ESU website (eg EMD 567, 645, etc), but where would one source sound files for things like Irish loco horns, flange squeal, brakes, guards whistles, buffer clash, coupling noises, coach door slamming, etc?

 

The soundfiles for the MM 201 and 071 decoders are available for download from the ESU website (they do this with all soundfiles they produce for other manufacturers).

You can then simply swap out the prime mover sound (or any other sound in the file) for the one from another file. The Lokprogrammer software also contains a library of sounds for this same purpose. Sounds from other files can be saved to this library for convenience. There is a shortage of prototypical Irish horn sounds but Euro and US horn sounds can be altered in pitch to make them more suitable.

My own 141/181  soundfiles use the MM 071 file as the basic template and I just switch out the prime mover. Sometimes I also change the flange squeal and alter the pitch of the horn sound slightly. There are 6 or 7 versions of the EMD567 available on the ESU website, including the prototypical 8 cylinder model. Even if you use the same engine sound in several loco the pitch can be altered slightly to make them sound different.

All of this is simply a matter of "dragging and dropping" in the Lokprogrammer software, it takes no great skill at all.

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31 minutes ago, irishthump said:

All of this is simply a matter of "dragging and dropping" in the Lokprogrammer software, it takes no great skill at all.

Thanks Graham for the really helpful advice and info. Having learned to program 6502 machine code on an Apple II in 1978 I am predisposed and very tempted to have a go at learning how to use a LokProgrammer. :) 

However another side of me is conscious of the time I might spend in persuit of customised sound projects and the steep learning curve needed to achieve quality projects and innovation at the cost of progressing other aspects of the hobby. Neil in WheelTappers has been very helpful and accommodating, already building customised projects for me using supplementary sound files I have provided him (eg alternate rail clank for two axle wagons and bogie stock, horns, etc). I’m delighted with the 141 and 181 custom projects he’s done so far. Perhaps in time, but I need to get on with reballasting a lot of track and scenic work first. 

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4 hours ago, Noel said:

Thanks Graham for the really helpful advice and info. Having learned to program 6502 machine code on an Apple II in 1978 I am predisposed and very tempted to have a go at learning how to use a LokProgrammer. :) 

However another side of me is conscious of the time I might spend in persuit of customised sound projects and the steep learning curve needed to achieve quality projects and innovation at the cost of progressing other aspects of the hobby. Neil in WheelTappers has been very helpful and accommodating, already building customised projects for me using supplementary sound files I have provided him (eg alternate rail clank for two axle wagons and bogie stock, horns, etc). I’m delighted with the 141 and 181 custom projects he’s done so far. Perhaps in time, but I need to get on with reballasting a lot of track and scenic work first. 

Noel, I have a Lokprogrammer that you are welcome to borrow to have a tinker around with if you want. Gerry

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26 minutes ago, Irishrailwayman said:

Noel, I have a Lokprogrammer that you are welcome to borrow to have a tinker around with if you want. Gerry

Thanks for the very kind offer Gerry. I may take you up on the offer after I have laid the track for Gort. :) Noel

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19 hours ago, Noel said:

Thanks Graham for the really helpful advice and info. Having learned to program 6502 machine code on an Apple II in 1978 I am predisposed and very tempted to have a go at learning how to use a LokProgrammer. :) 

However another side of me is conscious of the time I might spend in persuit of customised sound projects and the steep learning curve needed to achieve quality projects and innovation at the cost of progressing other aspects of the hobby. Neil in WheelTappers has been very helpful and accommodating, already building customised projects for me using supplementary sound files I have provided him (eg alternate rail clank for two axle wagons and bogie stock, horns, etc). I’m delighted with the 141 and 181 custom projects he’s done so far. Perhaps in time, but I need to get on with reballasting a lot of track and scenic work first. 

Yeah I hear you. When it comes to creating sound files from scratch I haven't had the time to go down that particular rabbit hole!

But there are other reasons I strongly recommend the Lokprogrammer... Blank decoders can be got for 99euro from supplies like Modellbahne. The cheapest decoders I can find from the UK (with a loaded soundfile) cost around £115 and if for some reason you're not happy with the file, you're stuck with it! (I realise suppliers are accommodating and will probably change a file for you but that necessitates you sending the decoder back to them). Legomanbiffo, who uses Loksound, will sell you the file if you wish for £10 so you can load and fine tune it yourself.

Also, ESU are constantly upgrading the firmware and features on the V4 decoders. Full Throttle, for example, needed a firmware update for it to function, the improved brake function is the same. Without the programmer I'd have had to send my decoders off to be reblown before I could use those features.

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Yes that makes good sense. Its inevitable for me I guess, but not just at the moment. Gort is priority number one at the mo, and then reballasting Kingsbridge. Had some fun earlier consisting two sound locos B121 and B165 using advanced consist on the NCE. 

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Two photos. :) Photo below of 121 class era and livery I was attempting to capture with the model in the 2nd pic below.

B123 at Sligo 1967.

15518402891_db3f89e1ef_b.jpg&key=7fd247f

B121 model - 3D Shapeways kit.

IMG_8568.jpg

The photo of B123 above was originally posted on the forum here by Kevin http://irishrailwaymodeller.com/applications/core/interface/imageproxy/imageproxy.php?img=https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5599/15518402891_db3f89e1ef_b.jpg&key=7fd247f9f3aa3fce2bd00a9d1c94918c9c73f9d07b8d3d99d58d31fd4264378c

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