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jhb171achill

From the Catacombs

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What to do on a rainy Sunday....but browse the October 1896 W L W R working timetable, which I came across while sorting some sort of vague order into the chaos that stalks this room forever.....

 

Three through goods trains per day traversed Limerick to Waterford, along with various short workings to the Junction. Passengers were catered for by trains leaving Limerick at 9.00am, 3.10pm and 5.45pm, with a mixed leaving at 11.00pm and arriving (passenger accommodation included) at 3.15 am. All four carried mails as well, apart from the 5.45pm; passenger services took typically three and a half hours, with 13 intermediate stops.

 

Thurles - Clonmel had two passenger trains, a mixed and a goods; journey time was an hour and ten minutes.

 

Limerick to Sligo had numerous short services such as a Tuam - Claremorris short passenger working, but the through trains were interesting. The day started with a goods trains departing for the whole length of the line at 2.30am. It had passenger accommodation as far as Ennis; one wonders how much patronage a train leaving at 2.30am from Limerick and dropping the drowsy passenger at Ennis at 4am might have had; all six intermediate stations were catered for too. Next, the 6.45am through passenger. Then came the down day mail at 10.40, which took until 7.15pm to reach Sligo, having (agonisingly?) called at all 29 intermediate stations, including a stop of an hour and 25 minutes at Athenry! Remember, this was mostly in six-wheelers with neither corridor or toilet.

 

The 3.20pm mixed Limerick - Tuam was last.

 

Reverse workings were much the same.

 

Limerick - Killaloe was a WLWR line - it was only from Birdhill to Ballybrophy that was GSWR. Two passenger trains and one mixed comprised the service on this line, the journey taking fifty minutes.

 

Foynes had one mixed and one passenger train per day. Both were connections from Limerick - Tralee trains. The Fenit line had a similar service, also with connections off the incoming trains from Limerick. The Limerick - Tralee line itself was the least busy of the WLWR's three main routes, with two passenger trains, a mixed and a goods in each direction. The journey took 2 hours and 17 minutes by the best service.

 

On all WLWR lines, all trains stopped at all stations.

 

Just picture those elegant 4.4.0s with their immaculately kept, but even then basic accommodation.

 

For livery nerds (like me), locomotives and coaches were lined burgundy maroon, and goods stock was dark grey with white lettering.

 

After only a few years, the GSWR would take over, though little would change until GSR days, when gradual neglect would see the system reduced to what it is today: ghost lines from Waterford to Limerick Junction, and Limerick - Ballybrophy, with the only bits used to any effect being Junction - Limerick and Limerick - Athenry.

 

Hope that's of interest.

 

(Mods: would a "historical" section on IRM be useful?)

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MGWR Broadstone departures, 1st January 1920:

 

a.m.

 

4.30 Passenger / perishables to North Wall (LNWR)

 

5.45 Engine & Guard's Van to Amiens St (GNR)

 

7.25 Down Limited Mail - Galway (from Kingstown Pier 6.5am) Journey time 4 hrs. Connections to Westport, Killala & Achill.

 

9.00 Cavan passenger

 

9.25 Kingscourt passenger (connection to Athboy). This originated at the LNWR terminal at North Wall at 8.45.

 

9.45 Creosote wagons to Liffey junction

 

10.00 Passenger to North Wall (LNWR)

 

p.m.

 

1.10 Sligo passenger

 

1.30 Galway passenger with connections to Achill & Killala

 

1.50 Kingscourt passenger

 

2.00 Passenger to North Wall (LNWR)

 

3.00 Maynooth passenger

 

5.45 Kingscourt passenger

 

6.00 Cavan passenger

 

6.30 Mail train to Amiens St (GNR) & Kingstown Pier

 

6.40 Passenger to North Wall (LNWR)

 

7.30 Galway night mail with connection to Westport only

 

It should be noted that departures labelled "Galway" also had connections for the branches to Edenderry, Clara, Loughrea, Clifden, Achill and so on, and also from Athlone to Westport, Achill & Killala. MGWR practice was that one departure would have all sorts of sections to be jettisoned for different connecting lines at major junction stations.

 

In addition, goods trains operated from North Wall (Midland) at:

 

12.45 am Westport (all stations Athlone - Achill)

2.00 am Athlone (Clara, Mayo Branch)

3.30 am All stations to Mullingar

5.00 am Kingscourt & GNR stations either side of Navan

5.00 PM Most stations to Cavan branch and branches, also beyond to GNR destinations

8.15 pm Ballina, with connections to Killeshandra and Cavan lines

10.15 pm Galway (Clifden & Loughrea branches)

 

Other goods went by mixed trains.

 

Cattle trains could load to 45 wagons LADEN!

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Posted (edited)

Buses from the Catacombs.

 

The Stilltime Collection

 

I found this site whilst searching the Internet. Wonderful photographs of buses from the past in Dublin. Double Deckers including the Daimler "DR" as well a single deck AECs of Class "A". The Garaiste boys will love this site. Hope others view and like it too. This link is not from the start of " Dublin" photographs - I have started it here because this photograph show one of the sic elusive CIE Daimler Double Deckers of Class "DR".

 

http://www.stilltimecollection.co.uk/detail/15892-tpt-transport-truck-lorry-wagon-roadstone-dublin-ireland-place-area-scene-scenery-destination-venue.html#13535

 

There are many, many photographs (132) of CIE's Buses, Lorries, Trains, Garages - Inside Donnybrook when it was brand new and Broadsrone with new "P" Class Touring Coaches.

 

http://www.stilltimecollection.co.uk/detail/15892-tpt-transport-truck-lorry-wagon-roadstone-dublin-ireland-place-area-scene-scenery-destination-venue.html#13614

 

Enjoy

Edited by Old Blarney

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Posted (edited)

Buses from the Catacombs.

 

The Stilltime Collection

 

I found this site whilst searching the Internet. Wonderful photographs of buses from the past in Dublin. Double Deckers including the Daimler "DR" as well a single deck AECs of Class "A". The Garaiste boys will love this site. Hope others view and like it too. This link is not from the start of " Dublin" photographs - I have started it here because this photograph show one of the sic elusive CIE Daimler Double Deckers of Class "DR".

http://www.stilltimecollection.co.uk/detail/15892-tpt-transport-truck-lorry-wagon-roadstone-dublin-ireland-place-area-scene-scenery-destination-venue.html#13614

 

Could not help and notice that the wall alongside the liffey is very high. Don't ever remember it that high. Any idea when photo was taken?

Edited by PJR
Fixing link address

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Posted (edited)

PJR,

 

Are you referring to the photograph which has the CIE Daimler bus in it? Route 72. If so the apparent high wall is in-fact a shelter with a roof that protected passengers from the rain and wind. This shelter along the Quays remained in place until the Country Bus Services were transferred from the Quays to Busarus. I remember the shelter well, I also remember the six Daimler and the Eleven AEC Double Deckers belonging to CIE, Class AR. I lived at, The Hill, Palmerstown as a youngster until going to Boarding School in Dublin in 1951. The 25, 26 and 72 all left from this location along with a variety of routes for the Country.

Do hope I have answered your question! Oh, when was it built, late 1940s and lasted until Busarus opened.

Edited by Old Blarney

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