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Inchicore Class J10 Conversion From LNER J72

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I have an old DSER appendix somewhere and some MGWR stuff. Will look.

 

Thanks jhb

 

I'll hold off until you return

 

Eoin

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Hi

 

A bit of light work this evening

 

J10C-67 IMAG3239.jpg

 

Directional lights were installed, they are made from small bits of 2mm sq and round styrene with a 1.5mm brass tube to make the lens housing, with transparent styrene disk over the miniature LEDs. After painting the bodies and sticking on the brass n cover I sealed the brass with Humbrol Clear Matt and the whole thing turned white when dry- bloody nightmare! Lots of washing with water and it cleaned up- don't use that stuff!

 

A little board was made for the LED resistors and the DCC control wires- another nightmare soldering those little wires.

J10C-65 IMAG3237.jpg

 

J10C-66 IMAG3236.jpg

 

But pretty cool when I plugged in the power to give them a test.

J10C-68 IMAG3240.jpg

 

J10C-69 IMAG3241.jpg

 

J10C-70 IMAG3243.jpg

 

Then loaded it up with a bit of coal......

J10C-71 IMAG3246.jpg

 

Eoin

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Thanks popeye

 

No its Noch SteinKohle! I thought is was real but when I opened the packet it turned out to be some kind of glass stuff, it still looks OK, some of it is a bit light in colour but I like the size and it looks good- though the glue is not dry Yet!

 

Eoin

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Very precise. Looking good.

 

How are the thin wires insulated? They look like copper covered by resin.

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Thanks Guys

 

Yes Noel it is as you say, fiddly stuff to work with, you have to make sure you scrape off the resin as I had two leads not working after soldering it up- had to undo, scrape again, and re-solder!!

 

Eoin

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Hi Eoin i was chatting with you in brey yesterday about these lights,,just a Q ,,YOU USED 2.2 K/OHMS FOR THE LEDS,IS THAT STANDARD RESISTORS TO BE USED WITH A DCC CHIP ?

 

PAUL

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Hi Paul

 

I believe it doesn't really matter the size of the resistor used with a DCC chip, the chip is throwing out 12volt and the resistor is limiting it to less! Actually I'm going to install another on the power out of the chip as the lights are a bit to bright!

 

Eoin

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Oil lamps, yes, would be dull and flicker sometimes!

 

That actually raises a point for modellers in general; if modelling the steam or early diesel eras, the super-white-bright halogen torchlights on modern trains of all types are not at all accurate for the past. As Eoin has correctly identified, modern ones are way too bright. Red tail lamps are also much brighter now than they used to be.

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Hi

 

The number plate erecting ceremony was this evening, all went well and now its numbered...

 

J10C-72 IMAG3247.jpg

 

I had the same Humbrol Clear Matt problem on the plates- dried out white! It's still a bit dull so I'm tempted to use a Gloss to make it clear again...

 

Eoin

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Dull would be right - these plates were made of cast iron, steel or white metal, never brass (except on the 800 class). Not only that, but the rims were painted cream, which would not have shone, or in some cases just rubbed down to bare metal (rim and numerals) with standard grey background. Thus, the duller it looks, the more accurate.

 

Given the brassy finish of these plates, in fact some dumbing down of the shininess is appropriate.

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Dull would be right - these plates were made of cast iron, steel or white metal, never brass (except on the 800 class).

 

A brass one surfaced back in 2004, lettered 'GSR 222 Inchicore Works 1924.R'. I assume the 'R' stands for 'rebuilt' as the loco was built in 1900 by Kitson of Leeds.

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There can't have been too many like that, Minister. I'm afraid I don't know what the "R" meant, but I would think you are right.

 

Sounds like a one-off.

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I had this craic happen on a few models and it boiled down to humidity, temperature, amount of water in the varnish. Turning down the pressure at which is was sprayed onto the model solved it for good. Don't ask me what the chemistry is. Great finish, but temperamental stuff. The wargaming lads have had this issue for years. My "cheat" is to take a bit of Windsor and Newtown varnish, spray it into a tub, decant it to the airbrush, and go from there. Never looked back, and the finish is sublime.

 

BTW, that's a stunning piece of workmanship on the loco itself, words are not really needed.

 

Richie.

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It's alive! it's aalivee!

 

J10C-73 IMAG3249.jpg

 

J10C-74 IMAG3250.jpg

 

J10C-75 IMAG3252.jpg

 

Installed the chip tonight and after a lot of jiggery-poke it came alive, very messy running at first but some dismantling and changing wheel positions I got it running like a rusty old steam loco on one cylinder. After a drop of more oil, adjusting the quartering to the best spot, and when the motor warmed up it started to run pretty OK, it's probably fairly prototypical!!

 

Its all a bit tight in the electronics cab and not quite going together! some more planning required....

 

Eoin

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It's alive! it's aalivee!

 

. . .

 

Installed the chip tonight and after a lot of jiggery-poke it came alive, very messy running at first but some dismantling and changing wheel positions I got it running like a rusty old steam loco on one cylinder. After a drop of more oil, adjusting the quartering to the best spot, and when the motor warmed up it started to run pretty OK, it's probably fairly prototypical!!

 

. . .

 

Hi Eoin. Well done. :) I found the same running issues with Bachmann split chassis after DCC conversion. Effectively due to the stiffness after putting the chassis sandwich back together again they needed to be run-in again. I've never managed to get a split chassis running as smoothly again once I had split it such are the minute tolerances. I blew one decoder such was the high current, so created temporary wiring connectors so it could be run as DC for running in, and left for an hour to run around an oval. It was an improvement but never quite as smooth as it had been out of the box. However with your model engineering skills I expect you will have greater success. Noel

 

Sides back together after reassembly.

F26B127B-14A9-435B-B7B7-A1CB8DD71913.jpg

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That looks the business Eoin, the split chassis is a good idea in principle but! I have also had erratic running from some after disassembly for cleaning but others were fine. Have had poor running in one direction with Hornby 4 pin dcc but am told the Hornby chip is not very good. Pit stop chip change at Digitrains and it goes like a good'un!

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Hi

 

I don't like split chassis, they are not fun when worn a bit! Much prefer a nice brass chassis and the axle type gearbox as there is incredible slob in these split chassis gearboxes- once the gears are up and running they centralise and run OK, but starting off and slow running can be a problem.

 

I find the Hornby chip to be no worse than any of the other cheep chips! It's mainly the running gear on this type of chassis that give the problems- sloppy gearbox, mad plastic axle sleeves that you cant stop the wobble- causing problems with the rods, and of course old bumpy wheels.

 

We will have to see how it runs on the test track

 

Eoin

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I don't like split chassis, they are not fun when worn a bit! Much prefer a nice brass chassis and the axle type gearbox as there is incredible slob in these split chassis gearboxes- once the gears are up and running they centralise and run OK, but starting off and slow running can be a problem.

 

Hi Eoin. I agree with you. I've stopped bothering to DCC convert anymore of my split chassis steam locos. Not worth the hassle. Noel

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No. 617 is now complete;-

 

J10C-76 IMAG3256.jpg

 

Some serious horsing to get the body on over the chip, wires and light board, but eventually got it to work! If one is going to do this job I would suggest taking off at least another 2mm from the top of the chassis to make it easier.

 

J10C-77 IMAG3255.jpg

 

J10C-78 IMAG3257.jpg

 

A few little touch up will be done- take the shine off the coal and replace the coupler with a shorter one.

 

The lads are having a chat about their new command.

J10C-79 IMAG3260.jpg

 

and just a picture to remind where this came from.

J10C-02 IMAG2904.jpg

 

off to the track next week for some trials.

 

Eoin

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Pure craftsmanship. She looks stunning Eoin. Respect.

 

Ps: one minor constructive criticism, you can clearly see an iPhone sticking out of the engineers jacket pocket. :) Kidding

Edited by Noel

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Pure craftsmanship. She looks stunning Eoin. Respect.

 

Ps: one minor constructive criticism, you can clearly see an iPhone sticking out of the engineers jacket pocket. :) Kidding

 

Thanks Noel

 

That's his sandwiches, sure that Inchicore vintage chap wouldn't be able to eat an iPhone....

 

Eoin

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Pure craftsmanship. She looks stunning Eoin. Respect.

 

Ps: one minor constructive criticism, you can clearly see an iPhone sticking out of the engineers jacket pocket. :) Kidding

 

It's a steam-powered clockwork iPhone, made by Apple & Co. Engineering Works in Manchester in 1912, so it's ok......

 

Seriously, an absolutely amazing, top class job. Looks sublime in every way.

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Hi All

 

Thanks very much with the fantastic comments

 

Should have a video of it on the Greystones Layout- it's home, on Friday next....

 

 

Did the real things ever stray from the Dublin area or did they work there for all of their lives?

 

According to Mr Clements all 5 of this type spent their entire lives banking and shunting at North Wall goods yard. But in our minds 617 'Pioneer' escaped and can be seen shunting in Greystones very soon....

 

Westhy

 

We need a number for the front buffer beam?- there is a picture of 618 showing it's number on page 202 of Mr Clements book- it seems to be a dark colour on a white drop shadow and numbers would be 2.5mm high....

 

Eoin

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The number could either be on its own, or prefixed by "No." if the spaces round the vacuum pipes permitted it. The buffer beams were red, in GSR days very thinly lined in black, with the number as you say shaded. The red buffer beams were the only reluef to the grey!

 

If you want to see the exact style of shading used, look at 461 and 186 as they are today. There were several colours used in it.

 

The only other colour detail is the numberplate. Painted over in grey, with rim and numerals picked out in pale yellow. Numberplate backgrounds on grey locos were always grey themselves.

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Hi

 

Well on a busy Friday morning last in Greystones

J10C-85 IMAG3264.jpg

 

617 setout from the shop with a light train for its first trials, things did not go well and the lads had to limp back to the shop. They did take in the sights and snapped a few shots while stopped at the Breeches waiting for the Wicklow Commuter to go by, and have a chat with Paddy- who has been working on that rock removal for the past year....

J10C-80 IMAG3261.jpg

 

J10C-81 IMAG3262.jpg

 

Back in the workshop with assessment made it was decided that the electrical pick up was the main problem for failure and I set about improving this- two PB strips were made up to push against the wheel boss from the underside, making contact with the wheels and the chassis improved the pick up immensely.

J10C-82 IMAG3269.jpg

 

J10C-83 IMAG3270.jpg

 

Springs n wheels in place and keeper plate about to go on.

J10C-84 IMAG3268.jpg

 

Then off to the test track......

 

 

Eoin

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