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TonyMcGartland

Modelling Irish GNR

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In 1987 when I started modeling GNR it was difficult. Its hard to believe that some 30 years later its really no better.

 

Over the past three months I have bought a small fortune of kits, bits and pieces of w-irons, axleboxes, brass wire, brake gear and materials - and I still have nothing.

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It is sad but within the niche of Irish model railways, the GNR is an even smaller niche. Conversion or scratch building is the only way to go there are just not the numbers to make commercial manufacture worth while.

 

MikeO

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In 1987 when I started modeling GNR it was difficult. Its hard to believe that some 30 years later its really no better.

 

Over the past three months I have bought a small fortune of kits, bits and pieces of w-irons, axleboxes, brass wire, brake gear and materials - and I still have nothing.

 

Id disagree with that, plenty of good quality kits available now and also RTR items from OOWorks and Provincial Wagons. Also the Bachmann GNR signalbox.

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I think the majority of modellers tend to model the railways they grew up with fewer people remember the steam era, judging by posts on this forum and available and planned RTR models demand is pretty much restricted to locos and stock that ran on CIE/IE between 20-40 years ago.

 

Its telling that the black & tan small GMs did not sell as well as the IE versions and the OO Works UG was only available in UTA colours and did not sell as well as the U although it was a more generally useful loco.

 

The availability of the Murphy Models diesels has probably lead to a greater interest in model railways in Ireland than ever before.

 

The GNR(I) is better provided in terms of good quality kits and scratch builders parts and than the GSR or steam era CIE

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Agreed. AL, SG, PP, T2, V, S, L12, K15, 20T Brake Van etc.....

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I would also like to kindly disagree, I think the GNRI has probably the largest range of wagon, coach and loco kits along with numerous other bits and bobs.

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I'm sorry, just finding it tough

 

It wouldnt be fun if it was easy. There are other hobbies

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Its called suffering for your art.I find part of the fun and challenge is modelling something different from what i remember, otherwise it would be the Berks and Hants,Swindon Works and lots of Westerns.The nearest to that is a Broad Gauge project of Marlborough c1860.Andy.

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I would also like to kindly disagree, I think the GNRI has probably the largest range of wagon, coach and loco kits along with numerous other bits and bobs.

 

In fairness there is now plenty of quality RTR rolling stock for CIE, IE, IR, whereas there seems to be more kits available for GNR, NIR, GSWR, MGWR, etc. One has the option to commission kit building.

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The research, info gathering, trial and error and slow build of a scratchkit is half the fun.

 

I really enjoyed kitbashing a Mk2 gen van using an old Airfix carriage. I knew every square inch of it and the work that went into it.

 

When I got Mr. murphy's RTR version I was obviously delighted, but still prefer the one I built myself!

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My real strengths are buildings and structures, maybe if I had a modellers toolkit and a magnifier/light. Until I get my new shed built and on site i'll take a break from modelling.

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My real strengths are buildings and structures, maybe if I had a modellers toolkit and a magnifier/light. Until I get my new shed built and on site i'll take a break from modelling.

 

The Maplin magnifier lights are very good, and the price goes up and down all the time - keep an eye open and catch one at the bottom of the wave.

 

And don't forget to put the cover on if there is even the slightest chance of the Sun reaching it.

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