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TonyMcGartland

Jacobs Containers

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I know we had Inglis, Hughes, Stevensons and Brewster bread containers but I received an interesting photo recently and in the background what looked like a Jacobs container (biscuits!. It sports the 'JACOB'S' logo and has No. M621 and M375.

Has anyone ever seen these or have knowledge of them?

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Hi Tony,

Is there any chance you could post a copy of the photo?

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Posted (edited)

I don't ever recall seeing them on trains, but trucks - loads of'em!

 

Also, that livery for Jacobs is probably late 70s / early 80s; thus decades later than the likes of Inglis - and thus inappropriate for the Derry Road area if that's an issue.

Edited by jhb171achill

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Tony et al

 

They DID exist and were small, I think wheeled containers - a fraction the size of my bread containers.

 

I have a note somewhere as Michael and I being lovers of Fig Rolls (I"m lying!) were tempted!

 

I'll get back on this one.

 

Leslie

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But not that type or modern logo.... I suggested 70s / 80s; I'm as much inclined to think 90s....

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Tony et al

 

They DID exist and were small, I think wheeled containers - a fraction the size of my bread containers.

 

I have a note somewhere as Michael and I being lovers of Fig Rolls (I"m lying!) were tempted!

 

I'll get back on this one.

 

Leslie

 

Photos, Leslie or i make a start on that double beet :P

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But how did they get the fig into the figrolls, that is the question....

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Tony et al

 

They DID exist and were small, I think wheeled containers - a fraction the size of my bread containers.

 

I have a note somewhere as Michael and I being lovers of Fig Rolls (I"m lying!) were tempted!

 

I'll get back on this one.

 

Leslie

 

Of course, they exist. The photo I have isn't the best but it clearly shows the container and logo with numbers on the side. The chassis is covered by GNRi vans in the foreground.

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Of course, they exist. The photo I have isn't the best but it clearly shows the container and logo with numbers on the side. The chassis is covered by GNRi vans in the foreground.

 

 

Jacobs container.jpg

 

Of course they did! a weeks supply of fig rolls and cream crackers arriving at Ballinamore on the C&L.

 

Presumably the containers were loaded at the Bishop Street factory and distributed by rail and road throughout the country.

 

Another Irish staple Lyons Tea was shipped by rail for many years in Type B containers in open wagons and later ISO containers http://myweb.tiscali.co.uk/gansg/5-unit/unitload1.htm

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Posted (edited)

I was delighted to get about 15 photos of various bread containers and a selection of wagon photos. Among them was a glimpse of this Jacobs container. Not the best of shots, but interesting!

 

GNR(i) Van.jpg

Edited by TonyMcGartland

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Lyons Tea container

 

 

kdTAtJg.jpg

 

I was thinking more of the traditional B type furniture or meat containers which CIE tended to load into open wagons rather than the more modern ISO containers.

 

4-Plank Open Wagons

 

Perhaps Leslie might commission a Lyons Tea or GNR Furniture container

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I was thinking more of the traditional B type furniture or meat containers which CIE tended to load into open wagons rather than the more modern ISO containers.

Perhaps Leslie might commission a Lyons Tea or GNR Furniture container

 

Leslie has done the larger GNR Furniture Container and he is in the process of commissioning a CIE one for his 4 wheel flat wagons.

 

_wsb_412x238_Conflat+and+container.jpg

 

Is this the B type Container you were thinking off, if so they are commercially available but look bigger than the one in your picture on post #13

 

IMG_2387 Containers.JPG

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Posted (edited)
I was thinking more of the traditional B type furniture or meat containers which CIE tended to load into open wagons rather than the more modern ISO containers.

 

4-Plank Open Wagons

 

Perhaps Leslie might commission a Lyons Tea or GNR Furniture container

 

Yes those were the type of containers I remember CIE transporting by rail and by road in the 1960s. Dapol unpainted 5 plank wagons would make perfect partners for the containers. I have some Bachmann conflat containers which might be suitable for resprays.

 

Interesting in that pic those are BR containers loaded on CIE wagons.

Edited by Noel

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Posted (edited)
Interesting in that pic those are BR containers loaded on CIE wagons.

They were certainly on the system but I know little of them. I presume the migrated from NCC territory or ships to various parts of the system. Maybe someone will comment? They seems to fit inside the broad gauge planked wagons pretty easily.

Waterford. Loco 263 shunting containers. 10.9.60

Metrovick C Class Loco in Tralee Yard (lurking in the background)

Edited by DiveController

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They were certainly on the system but I know little of them. I presume the migrated from NCC territory or ships to various parts of the system. Maybe someone will comment? They seems to fit inside the broad gauge planked wagons pretty easily.

Waterford. Loco 263 shunting containers. 10.9.60

Metrovick C Class Loco in Tralee Yard (lurking in the background)

 

They would have mainly come on the BR Irish Sea sailings though Belfast Dublin, Rosslare & Waterford Ports. Most traffic from points in Northern Ireland to the South would have been carried in conventional wagon loads, the Donegal was they exception containers were used to overcome the transhipment problem with the break of gauge and to allow Donegal traffic to travel under bond from Dundalk to destinations in Donegal.

 

A lot of the Irish Sea container traffic would have been meat from plants in Munster and the West to the London market and would have had to have been handled smartly by both CIE & BR. Oliver Doyle wrote about weekend specials of meat in containers from the Clover Meats factory in Waterford to Rosslare. Normally the traffic was carried on BR Waterford-Milford Haven service which did not run on Sundays.

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British Rail Containers on C.I.E.

 

I have viewed a number of photographs of BR containers of the type discussed on this thread. The text associated stating, the Containers were used for transportation of Motor Vehicle Parts shipped from British Car Manufacturers for assembly in the Republic of Ireland. The reason! During the 1950 and 1960, many of our imported vehicles were shipped as parts - Complete Knock-down (CKD) for re-assembly in Ireland. A number of Motor Trade Businesses in Dublin were importers and distributors of these vehicles, Brittain's , Booth Pool Etc.

 

For further information click on this link:-

http://www.irishtimes.com/life-and-style/motors/and-in-the-beginning-there-was-ckd-for-car-imports-1.1293448

 

http://www.irishtimes.com/life-and-style/motors/past-imperfect-1.389523

 

http://www.irishtimes.com/life-and-style/motors/gearing-up-a-history-of-irish-motoring-1.1096586

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One of the many things once carried, now forgotten.

 

An article on exactly what the railways carried, and from where to where, would be interesting, as goods traffic is very much neglected in model circles.

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One of the many things once carried, now forgotten.

 

An article on exactly what the railways carried, and from where to where, would be interesting, as goods traffic is very much neglected in model circles.

 

That's a sweeping generalisation there, JB, and a bit unfair on the modellers themselves. There are quite a few examples of prototypical goods trains to be seen on Irish model railways. However, as you know, it can often mean a bit of kit-building (I see lots of Leslie's kits in use, for example), kit-bashing, or scratch-building, and not everyone is comfortable or confident enough to try that just yet. From the RTR perspective, of course, we're doing our bit to improve things...

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One of the many things once carried, now forgotten.

 

An article on exactly what the railways carried, and from where to where, would be interesting, as goods traffic is very much neglected in model circles.

 

Flour

Tea

Milk

Sugar Beet

Beet bye-products for Cattle-Feed

Meat

Eggs

Butter

Bread

Biscuits

Chocolate and Chocolate Crumb

Cigarettes

Beverages - Guinness - Smithwicks - McArdles etc

Coal

Petroleum Products:- Mex - Esso - Shell/BP - Burmah - Lobitos

Agricultural Machinery

Cars and Vans and Buses too

Building Materials - Timber - Brick - Cement - Slate

Aggregates

Ore

Boats and Yachts

Cement

Timber

Fertiliser

Manure

Livestock - Cattle - Horses - Sheep - Pigs

Poultry - Hens - Geese - Turkeys

Pigeons

Perishable Produce - Vegetables - Fruit - Soft Fruits

Flowers

Cloth

Wool

Ordnance

Military Traffic

Paper

Newspapers

Timber

 

These are just some of my initial thought on traffic carried by the railways.

 

Over to you John!

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To get back to Tony's original post came across a colour photo of a Jacobs container in a photo of Phoenix shunting at Strabane in 1959 in Irish Railways in Colour a Second Glance Midland Publishing 1995.

. Phoenix is shunting a cut of wagons that includes an open wagon loaded with a Jacobs Container, a CDR or S&LR van and a dropside wagon loaded with what looks like a BR Type A container. Former GNR U Class Lough Melvin has been re-numbered as UTA 65

 

attachment.php?attachmentid=27997&stc=1

Phoenix.jpg

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This just popped up on one of the Facebook groups, might be of interest

 

image.png

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This just popped up on one of the Facebook groups, might be of interest

 

attachment.php?attachmentid=27999&stc=1

 

Possibly the Liverpool factory. The whole set up has a post WW1 trading estate feel to it like Park Royal in London or Trafford Park Manchester. The gantry is similar to the gantry built to service the MGWR track re-laying train in Mullingar during the early 1920s

 

The van on the left has a Lancashire & Yorkshire look to it.

 

It looks like Jacobs was a progressive company to see the advantages of containers in the early 1920s or did they go shopping for war surplus equipment like the MGWR?

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