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Colin R

Road Vehicles of the 1950-60 Period

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I am looking for typical road vehicles of the 1950-60 period found in Ireland, as part of the long term exercise in 00n3 modelling I was wondering what road vehicles where in use around that period, I have been told that the good old donkey cart was still much in use, by farmers, but I was looking for cars and trucks used by the local gentry ie the Doctor.

 

Would I be right in thinking there would have been more bicycles in use by the police and local council workers etc plus would the local shops have employed a boy with a bike to take out delivery's?

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The Railway Roundabout film would have been fairly typical of the West and areas with small family farms.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=geuu47Rr35U

 

Smaller cars and 22 axle trucks would have been pretty much the norm from the mid 1930s . Edward (donkey) was cheap to run for bringing milk to the creamry for small dairy farmers and bringing home turf from the bog, getting into places a tractor or horse could not go. Smaller cars such as the Ford Anglia, or VW Beetle often replaced the donkey for bringing milk to the dairy or transporting calves, sheep or pigs to the farm or mart. Oddly Ford or GM don't seem to have developed a Ute (Austraian/NZ farmers car/pick up truck) for the Irish Market

 

The economy took off with the more open economic policies of the 1960, the more prosperous farmer would aspire more to a Mercedes than a Ford or Volkswagen.

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Posted (edited)

Mainly British makes, "Sit up and beg" Fords..Anglias/Poplars/Prefects, Vauxhalls, Morris, Wolseley, Riley, Baby Fords aka Model Y. Older 30's and 40's cars might be still on the road in the 50's.

More upmarket cars might be used by the better off, Ford V8 Pilots.

 

Smattering of continental cars, Fiats/Renault etc. and very small numbers of cars of American outline, Chevrolets, etc.

(Bulleid had a Chevy Bel Air as a company car)

 

VW Beetles and the VW van (Kombi to Aussies/Kiwis) used by the ESB and the P & T.

 

Farmers sometimes used small Fordson or Thames dropside trucks for bringing animals to market or churns to the creamery but the number of vehicles on the road would be tiny compared to today. Small businesses; shops, bakeries, etc. might use the panel van versions of the above for deliveries.

 

Most people used bicycles and younger lads bought a motorbike before graduating to a car.

 

In country areas, the grey Fergie 20 would have to feature even though a lot of work was still carried out by horses.

 

CIE still used drays and carthorses well into the 60's for local deliveries.

Edited by minister_for_hardship

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For true authenticity Valencia has an Austin 10/4 Lichfield on it registration No WV7789,which was taxed 6months for 3 years at Queenstown laterly Cobh.So spot on for Valencia as well as Courtmacsherry.I did find out due to motive power crisis that Valencia will fit in/on her(fiddle yard on boot lid),did get some odd looks going up the M4 though Andy.

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The letters "WV" would be British. All old Irish registrations (plus, to this day, Northern Irish ones) had either an "I" or a "Z", or, as in IZ (Mayo) both.

 

Typically, the two letters were first, followed by a four digit number, e.g. ZL4196. (ZL was one of Dublin's combinations).

 

I have a full list somewhere....

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WV is a Wiltshire reg as her first owner lived in Wiltshire though they spent the hunting season on their estate near Cork hence the taxing in the Free State.Took her over a few years ago great especially "doing" the Tralee and Dingle.Andy.

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The letters "WV" would be British. All old Irish registrations (plus, to this day, Northern Irish ones) had either an "I" or a "Z", or, as in IZ (Mayo) both.

 

Typically, the two letters were first, followed by a four digit number, e.g. ZL4196. (ZL was one of Dublin's combinations).

 

I have a full list somewhere....

And, as we all know, the CI (Craggy Island) registration is actually Laois, the only county that does not border a county with a maritime coastline - spooky.

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2 great regs from back in the day

Sligo. EIE 10

Kildare IO 1020, this was on a gold coloured Merc owned by the Goulding family

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