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Noel

Kingsbridge - workbench

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While waiting for some bits for the locos did a little work on the 3D beat wagons. They are not 100% by any means but they will look much better than BR mineral wagons on my mixed CIE good train formations. :) Quick and easy to assemble with no resin fettling needed.

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3D beat bodies mounted on €7 Dapol RTR chassis

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Some bits to add then weathering, etc.  Also damming evidence since I was sentenced to "rot in the the bogie of eternal stench" by cutting up 141s for two C class chassis.

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Edited by Noel
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Nearly finished. 

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PS: JB the chassis are not black :) 

Edited by Noel
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1 minute ago, burnthebox said:

Looking very nice Noel, mind telling me where these came from, 

Regards

Paul

Thanks Paul.  The 3D bodies are from Shapeways and the chassis are Dapol unpainted RTR 10ft chassis. The finished wagons cost me about €28 each.  

 

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Transplant donors being prepared for the ritual sacrifice. This risks me being expelled from 'rotting in the bogie of eternal stench' such is the imminent destruction of such sacred cows, however cheaply bought into slavery from eBay.

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44 minutes ago, Noel said:

Transplant donors being prepared for the ritual sacrifice. This risks me being expelled from 'rotting in the bogie of eternal stench' such is the imminent destruction of such sacred cows, however cheaply bought into slavery from eBay.

IMG_4402.jpg

Will you have to do some drastic surgery to get the chassis to fit?

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4 hours ago, Irishrailwayman said:

Will you have to do some drastic surgery to get the chassis to fit?

Hi Gerry

Not for the C class but yes for the Sulzer. There was careful consideration and research about using these two MM chassis as donors, and the decision was not taken lightly or without considering alternates.  In case anybody thinks I'm being wasteful, I waited patiently over the past two years to acquire both of these donors at very low cost, both costing less than alternate Bachmann BR donor chassis on eBay.  I ruled out using Hornby railroad style chassis as often recommended with SF kits because they do not run anywhere near as precisely as Bachmann/MM centre drive chassis, and also ruled out spud drives like Tenshodo with 15:1 gear ratio because of their running quality. Hollywood Iron foundry was another option but are more expensive than these donors, they don't even have PCBs, and not DCC ready.

C class: Ironically the MM 141 is the ideal chassis for a C class in terms of length, bogie wheel spacing, lights, speaker space, easy of replacing bogie sides, NEM pocket heights to clear buffer beams, etc, and requires minimal work to fit the SF C class resin body, just cut a few mm of the both ends of the chassis using a mini drill disc cutter. You end up with a top class centre drive double flywheel runner AWD, AWP, lights, etc.

Sulzer: The 071 bogie axle spacings are a perfect match for the SF B101 Sulzer, but the chassis requires to be shortened by way of two cut and joins each side of the centre drive motor, including shortening both carden shafts. The reason for two cuts is so the shafts are still long enough to allow both bogies pivot freely when the shortened chassis is reassembled. The MM chassis has all the lighting on the PCB as well as the snap fit bogie covers that are easy to change sides while retain the NEM pockets.  

Other considerations were that I am already familiar with these Bachman/MM style chassis, they are 21pin DCC and sound ready, both with speaker cradles, both with lighting PCBs, and most importantly of all both run as smoothly and reliable as a Swiss clock.

 

Edited by Noel
multiple typos due lexdysia
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So sad. If IRM did A & C class loco's this would not be needed. :praying:

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39 minutes ago, popeye said:

So sad. If IRM did A & C class loco's this would not be needed. :praying:

Very true solomen.gif

PS: I still have the screen grab of a certain PM from 2015 advising me about RTR A class options :) 

Edited by Noel

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Just arrived on Kingsbridge a rake of 10 sugar beet wagons.  The cargo is more 7mm scale so will source replacement seed. :) 

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Nice work Noel.What do plan on using for the load eventually, seeds etc tend to go manky after a while.

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1 hour ago, jason brady said:

Nice work Noel.What do plan on using for the load eventually, seeds etc tend to go manky after a while.

When I find the correct size and similar colour, seeds on PVA to a flat plastic base sprayed with matt varnish to seal.

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Posted (edited)

Doodling with a few odd bits today.  CIE Brake parcels van conversion from LMS, and a pair of ex-GSWR brake vans getting a sort of CIE conversion.  These are not designed to be exact, more end up looking similar to their CIE counterparts.

Enlarged windows on LMS parcels coach filled in one, cut out windows on ex-GSWR brake vans (Tri-ang hornby GWR toads) and inserted window frames.  Cut out veranda door at one end, due to add vertical post due and move chimney. As an experiment with filling I used 'Mr Surfacer 500' liquid filer to fill one of the small windows (i.e. fill around plastic card window panel) on one side of the coach, and traditional model filler on the other side.  Just to compare how they apply and sand.

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Bachmann LMS bogie parcel van after holes drilled for new window sizes.

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Tri-ang GWR toads getting a pseudo conversion to a pair of ex-GSWR brake vans (well sort of).   Drill, file and cut out side windows.  Added window frames later.

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Relaxing afternoon and it passes the time nicely. :) Plan to add DCC lights to the brake vans.

Edited by Noel
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My attempt at producing a GSWR ballast brake van. Getting there but more work is needed to get the verandah size right.

3939F2CE-8E9F-4961-B1E8-5BE73EC3AC26.thumb.jpeg.c8ccd48e74b0fc4a73464df278373f86.jpeg3939F2CE-8E9F-4961-B1E8-5BE73EC3AC26.thumb.jpeg.c8ccd48e74b0fc4a73464df278373f86.jpeg

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Sorry Noel, I wasn’t trying to hijack hour workbench with the last post.

Stephen

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On 08/03/2018 at 5:47 PM, Noel said:

Doodling with a few odd bits today.  CIE Brake parcels van conversion from LMS, and a pair of ex-GSWR brake vans getting a sort of CIE conversion.  These are not designed to be exact, more end up looking similar to their CIE counterparts.

Enlarged windows on LMS parcels coach filled in one, cut out windows on ex-GSWR brake vans (Tri-ang hornby GWR toads) and inserted window frames.  Cut out veranda door at one end, due to add vertical post due and move chimney. As an experiment with filling I used 'Mr Surfacer 500' liquid filer to fill one of the small windows (i.e. fill around plastic card window panel) on one side of the coach, and traditional model filler on the other side.  Just to compare how they apply and sand.

IMG_5014.jpg

Bachmann LMS bogie parcel van after holes drilled for new window sizes.

IMG_4948.jpg

 

Tri-ang GWR toads getting a pseudo conversion to a pair of ex-GSWR brake vans (well sort of).   Drill, file and cut out side windows.  Added window frames later.

IMG_4946.jpg 

Relaxing afternoon and it passes the time nicely. :) Plan to add DCC lights to the brake vans.

Very nice job.

This is a ballast plough van rather than a goods brake - their goods brakes looked similar to the standard CIE ones later on, although lighter looking in construction than CIE ones. The goods brakes had double balconies.

For modellers, it's worth noting that the van above is at Downpatrick, but it's in entirely the wrong livery. In GSWR days there were variously all black, or dark grey, perhaps 2 shades darker than the bare plastic above. In GSR and CIE times, all grey - the very colour, in fact, of the plastic above. Needless to say, they never had a black chassis except when painted black, which would have been probably up to about 1900-05 or so.

After around 1970 or soon after, all bauxite brown, chassis included.

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A little progress.  The six nations is getting in the way of work today.

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Love the CIE mail brake!

And a superb job on the ballast ploughs....

1 hour ago, Noel said:

A little progress.  The six nations is getting in the way of work today.

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C'mon Ireland next week!!!  🇮🇪🇮🇪🇮🇪🇮🇪☘️☘️☘️🍺🍺🍺

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Posted (edited)

Started painting the brake parcel van tonight. Got both the white and tan on in one session ready for reverse masking tomorrow.

Then black on sides, ends and roof, fit Keen systems LMS suspended gangways, glazing, fit new NEM coupling pockets so she can be used with TL or Kadee couplings, paint chassis and bogies, paint new wheel sides, then gloss varnish, decals, weathering powders, weathering overspray, and finally matt varnish. It passes the time nicely.

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Posted (edited)

Just pulled the masking tape off the CIE Brake Parcel van conversion (ex Bachmann LMS parcel).  Tonight was spraying black over the reverse mask covering the orange and white. Next up the chassis, glazing, new corridor connectors, etc.  The painting took longer than expected because when I test sprayed my usual airbrush it was not allowing paint to flow smoothly despite a deep clean last time it was used.  Luckily I had the spare airbrush.

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Not as straight forward masking job as previous resprays due protruding vents over the doors half into the white stripe.

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Will give it 24hr before gloss varnish in prep for decals and weathering powders.

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36 minutes ago, Noel said:

The painting took longer than expected because when I test sprayed my usual airbrush it was not allowing paint to flow smoothly despite a deep clean last time it was used.

Despite the best will in the world, paint will get into all manner of places, and no amount of back spraying will help. If you are planning to do a decent amount of time on the air, and haven't used it in a week or so, you'll find some paint has plasticised somewhere. It'll have flowed from it's hiding place to an exit point, usually around the nozzle, and sat there. If the trigger action works then it's not in the central gubbins, but if you disassemble the nozzle cover, nozzle guard, nozzle, and nozzle mount, give them all a quick clean 9 times out of 10, it'll have you back up and running in jig time. 

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Thanks Richie.  That makes sense.  

What was also interesting is the Veda 186 I normally use has a 0.2mm needle/nozzle but the Veda 134 backup I used tonight had a 0.3mm needle/nozzle which doesn't sound much different in size, but it allowed a significantly wider paint area.  In fact I may use 0.3mm in future as it allowed better coverage for 00 gauge bodies anyway.

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Just be sure not to start mixing nozzle and needle sizes, just yet. You can have an 0.5mm nozzle and an 0.2mm needle, and a slip of a finger is a blunderbuss to the model. The last time I looked I went for an 0.5 nozzle and 0.3mm needle so you can go from sensitive to scuther coat with the one airbrush, but it's cavalier behaviour, and you should keep the same needle to nozzle ratio. 

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9 hours ago, Glenderg said:

Just be sure not to start mixing nozzle and needle sizes, just yet. You can have an 0.5mm nozzle and an 0.2mm needle, and a slip of a finger is a blunderbuss to the model. The last time I looked I went for an 0.5 nozzle and 0.3mm needle so you can go from sensitive to scuther coat with the one airbrush, but it's cavalier behaviour, and you should keep the same needle to nozzle ratio. 

Yes I remembered well your warnings and advice about this. :) 

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Photo with better focus.  Doodling with this little project has been quite enjoyable.

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Masking on this was a little tricky this time because there were so many raised relief items on the body sides close to the edge of the masking tape. It was not possible to do my usual air sealing of the tape using the wooden toothpick around some of these relief items, so instead of the usual airbrush distance and angle, I turned up the paint flow and sprayed exactly perpendicularly from a greater distance so no air pressure to blow paint under the bits of masking tape that were not flush with the sides. Vallejo paint seemed to make this easier, Tamiya may have started to dry a bit between the nozzle and hitting the sides of the coach due the longer distance the paint had to travel through air.

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When I did a bit of spraying, many moons ago I used to mask off the area to be sprayed but then spray the area where the tape and body met with the colour under the masking tape. This usually stopped the new colour leaching down onto the previously sprayed colour, 

So looking at your coach, I would have sprayed the lighter colour first. Masked it off for the black but then sprayed the joint at the tape with orange 

Make sense ?

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Hi Dave. I do find painting quite difficult if wearing gloxing boves. :) Seriously, yes yours sounds like a similar pattern.  Primer first, then approx white band un-masked and at the same time the approx orange area un-masked (i.e. both overlapping where the black will be).  Than put masking tape over where the white stripe and orange band should be, and spray the black. Wait 20 mins and pull the masking tape horizontally and reciprocally off. Noel.

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Time to do the glazing.  As the windows are now larger using a replacement strip of clear plastic with painted grey window bars. There was a lot of masking before spraying halfords grey plastic primer which I hope will grip the flexible clear plastic sheeting better than other paints.

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Previous and replacement glazing strips after painting the window bars on

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 Today I also painted and fettled the fittings for the replacement suspended corridors connectors, painted the chassis and bogies. Just a few more bits to do and she will be finished and then its weathering.

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Air brush mystery continues.  Restricted air flow on my Veda 186 compared to the 134 which I had to use tonight.  I’ve replaced the needle, nozzle and nozzle cover but do difference in air flow.  I am now guessing there may be a constriction occurring in the trigger mechanism (i.e. inside where the hose connects to the air brush).  Some dried paint must have worked its way down there.  Will try ultrasonic cleaner tomorrow.

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Hi Noel

Use cellulose thinners to clean your spray gun, cellulose will remove all paint if you spray with it after quitting painting, use it after spraying the paint thinners to wash the gun out first, or when cleaning the gun use it and/or leave it soak in it for a few hours- spanking clean every time....

If you have paint getting into the air in area there is a problem with the gun?

Eoin

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and

For those masking problem areas use liquid masking applied with a brush into the raised area under the masking tape, let it set then tidy it up before painting- Humbrol do it or you can use the liquid masking one gets in the Art n Hobby Shop

Eoin

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10 hours ago, murrayec said:

Hi Noel

Use cellulose thinners to clean your spray gun, cellulose will remove all paint if you spray with it after quitting painting, use it after spraying the paint thinners to wash the gun out first, or when cleaning the gun use it and/or leave it soak in it for a few hours- spanking clean every time....

If you have paint getting into the air in area there is a problem with the gun?

Eoin

Thanks Eoin.  I gave the 186 a deep clean last night including an ultrasonic bath, replaced seals, nozzle, needle (all 0.3mm), etc, but the air pressure is still significantly less than the other brush (134).  Will check there are compressor cable leaks even though that makes no sense as the 134 is working perfectly.  I am suspicions of the little air flow valve which is an additional feature of the 186 air brush that the 134 doesn't have.  Have dismantled and inspected it and replaced the O ring, all looked spotless and the ultrasonic bath should have released any unseen paint debris.  Even with the lower pressure will give it another try with paint later, just in case the 134 has different tolerances.

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Noel, am I right in assuming these are budget airbrushes? If so then cleaning is even more important. The cheaper models, while serviceable, tend to not be as well finished as more expensive models. This becomes a problem as the roughter finish on internal parts makes it much easier for paint to accumulate and harden. I have a couple of cheaper brushes that came with my compressor and while they work ok they are a bi*ch to keep clean and are really only suitable for applying coats when respraying. They're not good for detail work.

As Eoin said, cellulose thinners is yer only man for cleaning away paint deposits and sometimes an overnight soak is the only way to get it completely clean.

 

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