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RichL

Which station is this please?

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It's the LNWR station in North Wall, Dublin, looking from the train shed towards the road bridge at Sheriff Street and onward to Church Road. The shed became a goods depot after the station ceased operating in the 1920s, then demolished to make way for the re-developed docklands area in the 2000s. The main station building and adjoining LNWR hotel still survive. I believe the original photo now resides in the National Railway Museum archive in York.

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That was on a GB Facebook page a few days ago, it seemed to get largely ignored when it was suggested that it might be to the West..

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That does look like MGWR  Attock stock but I'd be just guessing...However, the architecture on the left hand side bears no resemblance to limerick. There's no decorative arched brickwork, as seen on the right, in Limerick Colbert. More than Likely Heuston, if the roof panelling is anything to go by. Everything fits. 

Edited by Glenderg

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This is bugging me, big style. Why is it the Victorian lads only had 1 mega pixel cameras, I'll never know... :P 

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What I like about that pic is the terminal station buffers actually get used and they parked trains right up against them wasting no space.  None of the modern silly buffer placement yards before the end of the platform edge, nor trains always stopped 10 yards before the buffers often wasting a coach and a half length of platform.  My 1960s memory is of passenger trains parked right up against station buffers to maximise space and give my visual OCD some mild respite :) (before accidents and H&S changes brought in safety distances).

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5 hours ago, Noel said:

What I like about that pic is the terminal station buffers actually get used and they parked trains right up against them wasting no space.  None of the modern silly buffer placement yards before the end of the platform edge, nor trains always stopped 10 yards before the buffers often wasting a coach and a half length of platform.  My 1960s memory is of passenger trains parked right up against station buffers to maximise space and give my visual OCD some mild respite :) (before accidents and H&S changes brought in safety distances).

There's good reason for this. Modern bufferstops at stations like Connolly and Heuston are of the friction type, with metal clamps placed at set intervals behind them and the effect of the friction of multiple clamps lessens the speed of runaways - hence the need for space behind the buffers. Repeated 'whacking' of the buffers would obviously shift their position and lessen the effectiveness of this system if it were ever needed. 

 

 

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Harcourt Street 1900 runaway train 1900 , Cannon Street 1991 https://www.railmagazine.com/trains/specifications/lessons-learned-from-cannon-street-crash are good examples of buffer stop collisions.

I think the loco in the photo may be a GSWR 0-4-4 back tank with a local train to Kingsbridge.

In steam days larger terminal stations like Kingsbridge, Amiens Street and Sligo had separate main-line departure and arrival platforms.  The arrival platforms usually had hydraulic buffer stops similar to the classic Hornby model https://www.mightyape.co.nz/product/hydraulic-buffer/25031703?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIgOyOs_vW1wIVgR0rCh0_mg0SEAYYASABEgKPKvD_BwE with plain buffer stops on the departure side.

The LNWR North Wall Station seems to have become something of a white elephant with the opening of the Loop Line in the 1890s and the growing importance of the Holyhead-Dunlaoire route.

The North Wall passenger station closed and the mail trains diverted to Carlisle Pier when the LNWR Dunlaoire-Holyhead steamer service won the Mail contract in the 1920s

 

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1 hour ago, Garfield said:

There's good reason for this. . . .

Thanks Patrick, yes I understood why the practice changed.  Good clip. 

51 minutes ago, Mayner said:

Harcourt Street 1900 runaway train 1900 , Cannon Street 1991 https://www.railmagazine.com/trains/specifications/lessons-learned-from-cannon-street-crash are good examples of buffer stop collisions.

I think the loco in the photo may be a GSWR 0-4-4 back tank with a local train to Kingsbridge.

In steam days larger terminal stations like Kingsbridge, Amiens Street and Sligo had separate main-line departure and arrival platforms.  The arrival platforms usually had hydraulic buffer stops similar to the classic Hornby model https://www.mightyape.co.nz/product/hydraulic-buffer/25031703?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIgOyOs_vW1wIVgR0rCh0_mg0SEAYYASABEgKPKvD_BwE with plain buffer stops on the departure side.

The LNWR North Wall Station seems to have become something of a white elephant with the opening of the Loop Line in the 1890s and the growing importance of the Holyhead-Dunlaoire route.

The North Wall passenger station closed and the mail trains diverted to Carlisle Pier when the LNWR Dunlaoire-Holyhead steamer service won the Mail contract in the 1920s

Thanks John, that's interesting info.  I remember Platform 2 & 3 in Kingsbridge were for mainly used for departures, with 4 & 5 used for arrivals with a disused loco release road in between (i.e. three tracks) from the steam days.  Noel

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15 minutes ago, Noel said:

Thanks Patrick, yes I understood why the practice changed.  Good clip. 

Was just making sure. Improved safety isn't something that would commonly be considered silly or wasteful. :) 

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2 minutes ago, Garfield said:

Was just making sure. Improved safety isn't something that would commonly be considered silly or wasteful. :) 

Absolutely :) Visual OCD is a terrible affliction.  

Mind you H&S in some other areas of life has swung far off the wall of practicalities.  Ironically some cases have had the unintended effect of reducing safety due to blind obsession with rigid procedures especially when combined with IR.  

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Kingsbridge/Heuston had two platforms and several carriage sidings in between under the overall roof until the island platform 3&4 was added in the early 70s. Platform 1 "The Military Platform" seems to have been mainly used for non-passenger traffic, Platform 2 for departures Platform 3 the later Platform 5 for arrivals. Connolly/Amiens St had a similar arrangement with the Howth Bay form local passenger traffic, main departure and arrival platforms with carriage sidings in between and the short Platform 1 used for non-passenger traffic and railcar maintenance.

In steam days a pilot loco would draw out the coaches of an arriving train to release the main line loco in stations such as Kingsbridge, Amiens Street and Broadstone.

The pilot might re-marshal the train before positioning it in the departure platform as the majority of passenger trains ran in loose formation and often carried tail traffic, such as carriage trucks, horse boxes and vans for perishable traffic & mail traffic rather like the AMTRAK passenger trains of the 1990s which carried considerable van traffic

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Very very hard to deduce identity of the coaching stock, but it could be Midland - though why a MGW train would be there doesn't make sense as far as I know. The windows look more "Midland" than "Southern" and if they were GSWR they'd look very much darker.

Looking closer though, the brake coach is certainly not MGWR as it would have a birdcage at that stage.

Now that'll bother MY version of OCD.....!

Edited by jhb171achill

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That's a great photo of the LNWR station, and to think it stood for over 80 years till it was completely demolished during the Celtic Tiger years by Treasury Holdings, I was very lucky to be on an IRRS tour back in July 1988, the inside hadn't changed in 80 years when that early photo was taken.

Regards

hg

Edited by h gricer

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Posted (edited)
On 24/11/2017 at 9:48 AM, Garfield said:

There's good reason for this. Modern bufferstops at stations like Connolly and Heuston are of the friction type, with metal clamps placed at set intervals behind them and the effect of the friction of multiple clamps lessens the speed of runaways - hence the need for space behind the buffers. Repeated 'whacking' of the buffers would obviously shift their position and lessen the effectiveness of this system if it were ever needed. 

 

 

I came across this report of 082 trundling off on its own at Portlaoise - and shifting the friction buffer nine metres.

https://www.raiu.ie/download/pdf/2012r002_runaway_locomotive_at_portlaoise_loop.pdf

Edited by Broithe
Grammar....
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