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Junctionmad

More on CIE livery 1980s Tan , yellow, orange

Question

 

CIE Generating Steam Van 3183 (ex-BR) Ballybrophy

copy right acknowledged - link only 

Shows BSGV 3183  in 1983  before the tippex livery , Most photos at this time show this kind of Yellow/mustard livery , rather then the more orange later tippex livery, 

Is this correct or a trick of the light , i.e. should I be repainting my Cravens to a far more mustard like colour 

 

The confusion is hers a picture from 1985 

 

1987-09-07 Irish Rail 146, Bray

which is the correct tone ?

thanks

 

Dave 

Edited by Junctionmad

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Its a trick of the light as at that angle you are also seeing a clear reflection of other colours (e.g. sky, trees and foliage opposite, etc).  "Mustard" isn't a colour that jumps to mind from the B&T era.  Tan, Golden Brown, Deep orange (i.e. more red than yellow).  "Some" later IR/IE era had more yellow in the orange mix, whereas early mk3s had a slight red bias.  Consistency was not consistent! :) Also factor in UV and weathering over time.

Edited by Noel

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here a picture from the 1976  ( again a link )

 

76.1875 Ardrahan

nice shiny carriage in possibly near new condition , so is that colour the original ?

 

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If of any use, so far on CIE era coach re-sprays and CIE B&T locos I have used a mix of Tamiya acrylic X6 (orange) with a few drops of X64 (brown), with a water based thinner for airbrush use. This gives a sort of 'golden brown' shade of orange. 

I plan to switch to mixing Vallejo acrylic paints for B&T tan/orange as they run through the airbrush a little easier and clog less, but I made a total bags of mixing their yellow and red last week.  Old chinese proverb start with lighter primary colour first then progressively add small quantities of the darker colour until the correct shade is achieved, not the other way around or you will use too much paint in the mixing process.

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Get a tinlet of phoenix precision Golden Tan, or whatever it's called, (enamel) spray or brush a square inch onto a piece of plastic. Then mix up your tan in acrylic, and spray or brush it on beside. The two dried alongside should help in terms of mixing to suit. A hairdryer is invaluable, as is one of those sample jars at the doctors' for large batches. Do it once, do it right. About 150ml should see you through until 2019. 

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The one at Bray looks best. The "mustard" and also the unnaturally dark shade apparently shown in the pic at Ardrahan are not at all accurate. They are the result of in one case under-, and the other case over-exposure of the camera film.

All three carriages are exactly the same colour. No weathering or wear comes into it; it's the photo in each case.

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Colour films back then would be different from one brand to another.

Fuji film was warmer than Kodak for transparency film.

Over or under exposure would affect the colour and the type of daylight.

Colour negative film and prints were rarely correct.

You only need to look through some railway books and you will see how many shades of orange there are.

Plus they were repainted many times over the years.    

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The picture at Bray above has a strong blue cast which i have corrected so you can compare. 

 

 

BRAY 1..jpg

BRAY 2..jpg

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