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Hi jb

It would most likely be a tank in some form of bund- a structure that would hold the full contents of the tank should it leak. The bund walls would be about 1 to 1.2 meters high built of brick or block and lined inside with asphalt in the early days, constructed in concrete with no lining later on. The tank would stand on two rising walls within the bund and the tank would be at a higher level so that if the bund fills the tank would be above the full level and not float! It would not be in an enclosure like a building, generally open above the bund for ventilation. A small discharge metering valve located at one end with hose and standard nozzle would be the associated gubbins......

Eoin

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I'm thinking something like the two smaller tanks in the foreground in that pic..... it would be a comparatively small-scale thing and based in the 1960-3 period when health and safety matters weren't taken as seriously as now......

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Posted (edited)

Hi jhb

Yes, and oil cans, oil cans all over the place- I forgot!

59eb7fb4b09cd_GS-25IMAG1907.jpg.e225b8b9e4c2774d941621476f654d2f.jpg

Eoin

Edited by murrayec
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Oil cans it is.... I was thinking about getting a pack of them, actually, to use as a load for one of Leslie’s corrugated opens....

 

 

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Posted (edited)
22 hours ago, jhb171achill said:

An update from Baseboard Dave has boards complete and work proceeding.

It had occurred to me that one of a number of excuses for short workings into this terminus would be the fortnightly tanker of diesel to feed the CIE bus based locally, for the once-daily service to Slievemore village. I am aware that such practices existed at Ballina and perhaps elsewhere. In order to provide a realistic environment to where this wagon will end up at the end of a siding, does anyone have photos of anything of the sort? Presumably there would be a lineside fuel tank and all the associated gubbins. What would be adjacent to it - would it be an open tank, or a small brick building enclosing it all? I'm sure they didn't just unload fuel from a tank wagon directly into a bus!

CIE had a habit of leaving un-economic bus routes in rural areas to private enterprise. CIE carefully avoided running a staged service to Castletownbere and Glendalough and quickly gave up on Thurles-Clonmel once it abandoned its rail passenger services.

Fuel oil to the Dugort Harbour fishing fleet rather than the occasional internal user tank wagon, would probably be a more likely traffic and tie in with the original purpose of a railway built to stimulate the fishing industry in the West of Ireland.

To quote Eoin there appeared to be 45gal oil drums or barrels every where at Valencia Harbour in CIE days, the barrels may have been for use on the island before the opening of the bridge in the 1970s rather than fuel for fishing boats.

The County Donegal used scaled down tank wagons to service the Killybegs fishing fleet, the Swilly also had tank wagons ,so ESSO or Irish Shell Class A tank wagon with silver tank barrel and red solebars would make a nice contrast to CIEs grey and green rolling stock. Bachmann produce passable models of these older cradle mounted tank wagons which survived in traffic into the early 70s.  https://www.track-shack.com/acatalog/Bachmann-37-684A-OO-Gauge-14-Ton-Tank-Wagon-ESSO-Bachmann-37-684A.html.

Most branch terminals (including Cahirciveen) and some through stations had small oil depots since the 1930s. Some had vertical like Bantry others horizontal tanks.

Ratio produce a passable fuel depot https://www.track-shack.com/acatalog/Peco-Ratio-529-OO-Scale-Oil-Depot-Peco-Ratio-RT-529.html

The other common wagon at Valencia Harbour was the ventilated version of the outside framed Irish Railway Clearing House & GSWR van most likely used for fish traffic on the afternoon "Perishable" to Farranfore which connected into the Up Tralee-Mallow & Cork-Dublin Night Mail trains to arrive in time for the Dublin Fish Market.

The simplest solution might be to replace these with green CIE H vans no doubt introduced to replace the pre-amalgamation vans used for perishible traffic, or modify a few Provincial Wagons GNR standard vans with plasticard louvers to resemble the older vans.

 

 

 

L

Edited by Mayner

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That's exactly the type of realism I'm planning for, Mayner - thanks. I've this idea of a once-daily bus heading off to some place in the back of beyond, but to justify its existence it probably ends up somewhere - like a Clifden - Westport bus would.

I like the fishing boat idea too!

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Here is a picture of the ratio oil tanks kit No 530 or 529.

ratio-530-oil-tanks-plastic-kit.jpg.a7de21f549216286066cbb164e615283.jpg

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Work proceeds chez Baseboard Dave, in the Badlands of Edenderry......

Left to right:  Outer loop, where wagons awaiting unloading will be placed. Middle line: run-round. Right hand track on loops: platform road.

At the end closest to us will be a short double-sided platform, as was the case at Westport Quay. At Dugort Harbour, there will be some sort of local grain merchant whose stuff will be loaded and unloaded here. You can probably make out my scribblings on the boards showing where the main platform will be. With little passenger traffic (a la Valentia Harbour), parcels and mail will be unloaded here, as there will be a mail depot nearby. This seems odd for a remote rural location, but the idea is that the "big town" isn't far away (a la Westport) and the sorting office is closer to here than "town"; i.e. on its outskirts. The real reason is that it gives me an excuse to have a truly random collection of mail vans arriving - this is 1960, and alongside brand-new "laminate" type designs, there are Bredin mail vans, "tin vans", and brake passenger coaches ranging from ancient GSWR 1880s six-wheelers to heavy GSWR bogie vans.

The station building will be of the same sort of cheap'n'nasty design as those on the Valentia line, or parts of West Cork or the West Clare. This will look appropriate, though again there's a practical reason - fitting it into as small a space as possible.

Given the angle of photography, the run-round loop looks a good bit shorter than it actually is. In the distance, as the line disappears, can be seen a stream which will go under the railway in a small culvert.

On the right is a long goods bank. At this end of it will be a small oil store, as the local fishing fleet have long abandoned rowing boats - it IS 1960, after all. The curved siding beyond it leads to a loco servicing site. The shed has long succumbed, but an overgrown inspection pit and still-operable water column remain; this will see visits from Roderick's 00 Works J15s, and the SSM one I have. To the extreme right will be a long gods bank with small corrugated goods shed. I have been saving a certain dimension of matchstick for a while, which will form the basis for one of those 1960s/70s wooden ramps seen on goods platforms, where lorries could back up to tip beet into wagons. At beet time, the place will be a bit like Timoleague, with specials of open wagons appearing.

 I wanted a turntable down the loco road, but those available from proprietary sources are (a) not that cheap, and (b) far too big. What would be turned here would be a GM 121 or a J15, not a Chinese "QJ", an Indonesian D52, or the Union Pacific's "Big Boy"! So, after also considering an overgrown pit adjacent to it, which might indicate the site of a former disconnected one, I decided to keep it simple and put a pile of old sleepers or something in long grass beside it!

At present, operation will be confined to trains entering and leaving from a fiddle yard. The layout is thus designed to combine:

1.  Interest in shunting operations

2.  Realistic operation given the sort of outlying location portrayed

2.  The possibility of future expansion beyond the fiddle yard (which is out of sight to the right)

3.  Realism of scenery and surrounds - a central and essential part of which is a feeling of space. the surrounding scenery, rather than being packed with stuff, will be fields with a few sheep in them, and maybe a gable wall of an old famine ruin or something.

The line will cross the small stream, with the ground sloping gently but unevenly to it on both sides. The plan is not one level patch of ground - the idea is an area of rocky fields. Beyond the stream, the land will rise and at the far end of the curve a short rock cutting will lead to a bridge, under which the line will disappear into the fiddle yard.

Future long-term plans will be an extension, which will end in a terminus based on a country town terminus. The whole line will then take on the persona of a self-contained line a bit like a mini-West Cork system, or the Tramore line. Planning applications for this have been submitted to the Dept. of Domestic, Upper Living Room & House Planning Affairs. Their Chief Domestic Officer assures me that the application has been received, but is currently on file, pending discussion with the Resident Dog, whose basket and water dish will need to be moved, and Todd Andrews.

20180718_155641_resized.jpg

I might add that the cut-out on the left corner is on account of a similar cut-out in the wall in the room where it will be!

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I just cant let this go John but I think you should loose that 3 way point. Being so rare on Irish railways it seems out of place at least to me and the it looks like you have plenty of space for an alternative arrangement.

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