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Hi jb

It would most likely be a tank in some form of bund- a structure that would hold the full contents of the tank should it leak. The bund walls would be about 1 to 1.2 meters high built of brick or block and lined inside with asphalt in the early days, constructed in concrete with no lining later on. The tank would stand on two rising walls within the bund and the tank would be at a higher level so that if the bund fills the tank would be above the full level and not float! It would not be in an enclosure like a building, generally open above the bund for ventilation. A small discharge metering valve located at one end with hose and standard nozzle would be the associated gubbins......

Eoin

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I'm thinking something like the two smaller tanks in the foreground in that pic..... it would be a comparatively small-scale thing and based in the 1960-3 period when health and safety matters weren't taken as seriously as now......

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Hi jhb

Yes, and oil cans, oil cans all over the place- I forgot!

59eb7fb4b09cd_GS-25IMAG1907.jpg.e225b8b9e4c2774d941621476f654d2f.jpg

Eoin

Edited by murrayec
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22 hours ago, jhb171achill said:

An update from Baseboard Dave has boards complete and work proceeding.

It had occurred to me that one of a number of excuses for short workings into this terminus would be the fortnightly tanker of diesel to feed the CIE bus based locally, for the once-daily service to Slievemore village. I am aware that such practices existed at Ballina and perhaps elsewhere. In order to provide a realistic environment to where this wagon will end up at the end of a siding, does anyone have photos of anything of the sort? Presumably there would be a lineside fuel tank and all the associated gubbins. What would be adjacent to it - would it be an open tank, or a small brick building enclosing it all? I'm sure they didn't just unload fuel from a tank wagon directly into a bus!

CIE had a habit of leaving un-economic bus routes in rural areas to private enterprise. CIE carefully avoided running a staged service to Castletownbere and Glendalough and quickly gave up on Thurles-Clonmel once it abandoned its rail passenger services.

Fuel oil to the Dugort Harbour fishing fleet rather than the occasional internal user tank wagon, would probably be a more likely traffic and tie in with the original purpose of a railway built to stimulate the fishing industry in the West of Ireland.

To quote Eoin there appeared to be 45gal oil drums or barrels every where at Valencia Harbour in CIE days, the barrels may have been for use on the island before the opening of the bridge in the 1970s rather than fuel for fishing boats.

The County Donegal used scaled down tank wagons to service the Killybegs fishing fleet, the Swilly also had tank wagons ,so ESSO or Irish Shell Class A tank wagon with silver tank barrel and red solebars would make a nice contrast to CIEs grey and green rolling stock. Bachmann produce passable models of these older cradle mounted tank wagons which survived in traffic into the early 70s.  https://www.track-shack.com/acatalog/Bachmann-37-684A-OO-Gauge-14-Ton-Tank-Wagon-ESSO-Bachmann-37-684A.html.

Most branch terminals (including Cahirciveen) and some through stations had small oil depots since the 1930s. Some had vertical like Bantry others horizontal tanks.

Ratio produce a passable fuel depot https://www.track-shack.com/acatalog/Peco-Ratio-529-OO-Scale-Oil-Depot-Peco-Ratio-RT-529.html

The other common wagon at Valencia Harbour was the ventilated version of the outside framed Irish Railway Clearing House & GSWR van most likely used for fish traffic on the afternoon "Perishable" to Farranfore which connected into the Up Tralee-Mallow & Cork-Dublin Night Mail trains to arrive in time for the Dublin Fish Market.

The simplest solution might be to replace these with green CIE H vans no doubt introduced to replace the pre-amalgamation vans used for perishible traffic, or modify a few Provincial Wagons GNR standard vans with plasticard louvers to resemble the older vans.

 

 

 

L

Edited by Mayner

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That's exactly the type of realism I'm planning for, Mayner - thanks. I've this idea of a once-daily bus heading off to some place in the back of beyond, but to justify its existence it probably ends up somewhere - like a Clifden - Westport bus would.

I like the fishing boat idea too!

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