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GNRi1959

Omagh GNRi station

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Three-way points, while exceptionally rare in Ireland, are great space savers if absolute accuracy regarding track layout isn't paramount, and space is short.

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I am hoping on coming up with a fairly accurate section of the track around the Omagh area. The Goods Yard looks impossible at this point however I can use the Engine Shed and turntable to link with some mainline traffic. The Market Branch isn't impossible but I have little or no photographs of the buildings around it.

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Maybe best to have this discussion before laying any track, Tony, but from previous posts I gather your main interests are a shunting yard type of layout. To that end, would it be worth considering an actual model of the markets branch terminus, rather than the more extensive main station yard?

 

Just a thought....

 

On the subject of shunting-yard-type layouts, I always thought that the Polloxfen's Mills sidings at Ballysodare would make an excellent model, as this site had an extremely cramped layout, complete, indeed, with several 3-way sets of points. And it was operable well into diesel days.....

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There are three interesting parts of Omagh that interest me and give opportunity. The North Cabin with the mainline that runs under a road bridge and towards Newtownstewart. The goods yard,which I could re-arrange to fit on available space and theres the Engine Shed at the opposite end of the station with turntable and adjacent road bridge. Both road bridges would allow me to conceal a continuous run-around if required.

 

Is it all too ambitious in the available space?

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Tony, you sound like you are fairly patient in the progress of this layout. That patience may produce dividends in the form of the wanted pictures you are modelling.

 

I spoke to the ice cream man two weeks ago and conversation turned to model railways. This pointed me in the direction of another chap joining our fledgling club. Conversation with him led me to getting a dozen new photographs to aid me in building Ballymena station. These included the station masters house, roadside views of the loading bay, ancillary buildings and the bay platform. All will prove invaluable when it comes to producing the model. This conversation took place in front of another member. He knows someone who has a lot of interest in the local railways and will ask him if he has any further resources to aid me. Both chaps also suggested contacting the Railway Preservation Society and draw on their members for any information - a possible route for you to peruse too.

 

Anyway, my long winded point is that you never know where the next nugget of gold is going to come from. I've been on my quest for 9 months and the greatest amount of information gained has been in the past 24 hours. Fingers crossed for you.

 

Paul

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In terms of space, as others have pointed out, a radius of less than a fraction over two feet is not really do-able in 00. many of us started off with layouts of 6ft x 4ft (maybe you did too?) and this allows about the smallest feasible layout with a continuous loop. the stations possible on the two "long" sides will allow little more than a platform which holds three bogies, or a run round which allows a loco to get around two. If, on the other hand, you have a "U" shaped setup, while a continuous loop isn't feasible, an end-to-end is, and this will give you about4ft to work with at either side of the layout. That type of thing is suitable for a shunting type of thing.

 

You could have one side as a fiddle yard, and the other a more accurate representation of the goods yard. The "through road" would end as a blank end in an overbridge. Alternately, each side could be a "terminus", so here's a possible idea: One side is the markets branch terminus, the other is the main good yard.

 

Assembled in modular form, with proper design (possibly via Baseboard Dave of this planet) it should be possible to make it portable.

 

A couple of "UG"s and perhaps an ex-NCC "Jeep", or a dirty "S" clas in UTA livery would be all you'd need, along with (judging by the space you say you have) maybe a total of thirty or so wagons. I gather you're not that interested in passenger workings, but two old wooden GNR bogies and perhaps a K15 would add a bit of interest. The existing steam engines would be compatible, and their presence in a good area could be passed off as an IRRS special or Sunday school excursion, having stock stored there overnight.

 

If you can, a circuit is better. This allows the Omagh - Derry local, or an Enniskillen - Derry train to pass through, with just those 2 or 3 carriages. Equally, a 2-coach AEC set with one of them in tow, or in the middle, would add interest as it passed by en route to Great Victoria Street.

 

You could have a man in a long grey trench coat and a battered leather briefcase on the platform staring at a rail joint; this would be jhb171senior on his bi-annual inspection of the track!

 

What were the dimensions of your shed internally again? And is it properly insulated?

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Tony, you sound like you are fairly patient in the progress of this layout. That patience may produce dividends in the form of the wanted pictures you are modelling.

 

Anyway, my long winded point is that you never know where the next nugget of gold is going to come from. I've been on my quest for 9 months and the greatest amount of information gained has been in the past 24 hours. Fingers crossed for you.

 

Paul

 

Paul, your input is valued and I thank you. I've no plans to storm into anything. As I keep telling my Carpentry students "Measure twice, cut once"!

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jhb171, your comments are welcome, full of ideas and offer realistic options. I think if jhb171senior was on the platform carrying out inspections I would have to consider the permanent way foreman, Paddy McGartland standing at his hut on the convent siding pulling on a cigarette and telling his men to 'keep busy'!

 

The shed measures 10x6 outside with a sound 3" frame clad with T&G boards so I guess I lose about 6" all round. I will be filling the studwork with quilted insulation and sheeting inside with 'smartply'. The roof is PVC coated tin on a plywood pitched and trussed roof. I will insulate the inside of the roof with Kingspan foil backed insulation boards.

 

The floor is solid ply on 4" joists and on top of that I'm adding insulated exterior grade ply. Our directors office is having a refit so I've been promised carpet tiles from that.

 

I'd love a continuous circuit but something tells me space would dictate a U-shape, as you have already suggested.

Thanks again for your thoughts.

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Tony

 

If the outside is 6ft, that means the inside is 5tf, based on losing 6 inches each side - or maybe you mean 6ins in total, i.e. 3ins per side.

 

If that is the case, a "U" shape really is the only option - and you're looking at short wheelbases as the one curve will be very tight indeed. Thus, a 4.4.0 will be necessary - an 0.6.0 mightn't take a curve as sharp. So, you're looking at a couple of "U" class really.

 

Since the 141 class just barely made it to Omagh, you could use one on the basis that the line stayed open just a year or two more, and CIE started working them on the goods through to Derry, after the UTA scrapped most of their steam engines!

 

Rolling stock would probably need to be all 4-wheeled, so a shunting end-to-end based on goods yards only would appear to be the only option - but - a very good one. It's a pity that the shed couldn't even be one foot wider, but there is the possibility of the above with what you have.

 

My dad would have been delighted to see an Omagh-based layout.

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Building the layout in OO opens up the option of using modified British RTR locos rather than scratch or kit building GNR prototypes. In the past the GMR/Airfix 4F modified with a round top firebox and canopy cab was used as a basis for the SG Class 0-6-0. Both Hornby & Bachmann produce a 4F, the Hornby loco is based on the 30 year old Airfix tooling complete with tender drive, while the Bachmann loco is more recent with the motor in the loco. http://www.hattons.co.uk/52563/Bachmann_Branchline_31_882_Class_4F_0_6_0_43924_BR_black_with_late_crest_and_Fowler_tender_as_preserved_/StockDetail.aspx

 

Likewise it might the Hornby T9 with a new cab & 6 wheel tender could be used as a basis for an S Class.

 

Allow a year and a budget of £250 per loco if you decide to build from scratch or assemble a loco from a kit.

 

Worsley Works produce scratchbuilder parts for the GNR U & UG locos and underframes sides and ends for AEC & BUT railcars and a number of different coach types. SSM produce kits for the AL 0-6-0, PPs 4-4-0, S & SG Class, K15 & L12 coaches & the 30T goods brake

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John, I think you're correct on this one. Thanks for the insight into some of the possibilities available.Some thought, research, planning and patience will go a long way in doing this right.

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At the risk of muddying the waters even further Tony, have you got as far as thinking about couplings?

A prime issue with them is track radius, for if 3 links are used, then buffer locking with be a real issue on radii below 36".

Likewise for Jackson's and probably a range of others.

In 7mm scale, Dinghams are pretty reliable, but being 'handed' are not so good if a turntable is involved. Believe they are ok in 4mm too.

Any auto coupling involves compromise of course, not least because, apart from Kaydees, they don't look prototypical.

Whatever you use though, be sure to factor them into your track plans, especially where uncoupling magnets might be sited, or where tight curves could affect reliability of running.

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Garden Shed arrived this evening, bit of landscaping to do around it and insulation. Will keep me busy until the real fun begins.

 

IMG_1741.JPG

 

IMG_1742.JPG

Edited by TonyMcGartland

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At the rear end of the shed I've laid a PVC water channel between the garden shed and garden soil level. A 13" DPC was laid under the shed and folded up to create a barrier. I couldn't clear the soil away any further as there is a large maple at this end. The remaining three sides are clear of all soil or moisture. The plan is to lay pea gravel to the remaining sides to act as soak aways. The shed is raised on a 4" block foundation laid of a sub-base of concrete flags (double protection) so should have plenty of protection from ground conditions.

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I'm a bit lost for ideas on the baseboards. I'm seriously thinking of building sectional baseboard units at my workplace and have these screwed to some sort of base in the shed. If I ever need to remove the layout or exhibit, I don't need to dismantle.

Edited by TonyMcGartland

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I'm a bit lost for ideas on the baseboards. I'm seriously thinking of building sectional baseboard units at my workplace and have these screwed to some sort of base in the shed. If I ever need to remove the layout or exhibit, I don't need to dismantle.

 

Hi Tony

This supplier of customised sectional baseboards may be able to assist http://www.modelrailbaseboards.com. Ultra portable and quality especially if you are considering exhibiting as a future option.

Noel

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Today I insulated all internal walls of the shed with 100 rock wool, the roof surface will be done tomorrow. If I don't get to the show in Enniskillen tomorrow I don't mind as I'm taking delivery of 8 x 4 sheets of 12mm SmartPly that I will be screwing onto the shed interior. This will give me a sound internal wall. The electrician is also coming tomorrow to bring in the power supply. Thats the plan, hope all goes well.

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Shed walls now clad with 12mm SmartPly. Ceiling to be completed yet but waiting for electrcian to call and advise.

Edited by TonyMcGartland

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Are GN and UTA bread container conflats painted brown or grey? I have a selection of photos but only one that is in colour and it looks brown? 

Can anyone sdd to this?

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Both!

Grey for unfitted wagons; brown for fitted.

Take a look at "GNR Wagons" and you'll see the colours used by Dapol on my earlier conflats. I did several hundred of them. Of course they were BR ones repainted.

MY Bread Containers (of which you have a couple?) were scaled a little to fit two on one of these.

Are you going to scratch build a "proper" Flat?

Leslie

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Leslie, I have a few Dapol and Bachmann conflats that I bought up last year to go with your excellent bread containers. These are fine in the meantime, I would ideally like to scratchbuild a few also. Can I ask what paints/colour do you use on your containers (Colour catalogue numbers would be good)

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Tony

My memory is that Dapol used what they call "MILNER" Grey for the unfitted. I don't think you'll find that in any catalogue! In general, we suggest painting "grey" wagons with Halford's grey primer!

As for the brown - I'm sorry I can't help. 

Leslie

Edited by leslie10646

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Leslie, I have a Halfords Grey Primer at the ready. The samples attached were hand painted last year when I was working indoors. I'm now located outside in the new shed and just slowly getting the shed organised. These were sprayed with a matt acrylic varnish to seal the Railtec transfers but I'm not sure if its the correct spray for this job as it seems to coat everything with a fine grey mist. They will please me until I start scratch building in earnest!If there is anything obviously wrong do let me know please. 

IMG_1912.JPG

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Heres the same bread container and conflat with the BR brake lever removed and replaced with a white metal single brake lever.

 

 

IMG_0027.JPG

Edited by TonyMcGartland
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The start of work on the GNRi weed spraying wagon with brass w-irons, whitemetal axleboxes and single brake shoe in place. Ready to take the whitemetal lever.

 

 

IMG_0043.JPG

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Heirflick, just a little progress tonight. Managed to prime the Hornby RTR shell wagon thats pretty close and fit levers to the weedsprayer. Delicate work with lots of eye strain

 

 

IMG_0058.JPG

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If this is of any use, PRONI has amongst their collection from the erstwhile UTA, sets of drawings of GNR(I) wagons (reference code UTA/23/AB/1), including a detailed drawing of the GNR(I) weed spraying plant dated 1937. A small image of this drawing was publicised recently in Archives & Records Magazine and it shows the tank wagon with its 6-wheel companion.weedsprayer.jpg.f061260368bb8e7130d49f2a8e1cbbc6.jpg

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After one full year of teasing ideas around on this forum today I finally started setting up my baseboards for my model of Omagh GNRi Station in N gauge. I have installed a baseboard measuring 2100mm x 800mm giving me a compact baseboard with lots to offer in this smaller scale. The sketches look good and after weeks of thought I have moved its progress over to the N-Gauge forum. 

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After a break, taking time to re-focus, I have now almost completed installing the NEW framework and baseboards for my layout. The layout concentrates on the Derry Road and its connection to the Enniskillen line. The previous structure was removed and replaced with a framework that gives me two options, an end-to-end U- shaped layout measuring 350mm wide around three sides 2900mm x 1650 with the option of adding an additional unit, at a later date, to complete a circuit and give continuous running. This 00 gauge layout is a major rethink on Omagh maintaining the core layout of the station but using some modellers 'licence' to allow things to work.  The framework also provides good storage space below. The fixed framework is 44x32mm with separate modular 9mm ply modular baseboard tops measuring 750x350mm. Photographs will follow, once all the carpentry work is complete.

Edited by TonyMcGartland

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Things are starting to take shape. Framing almost complete complete. 9mm ply sitting loose on the 60x20mm baseboards. Have to mark out layout drawing full size on boards and then cut and elevate the ply to form the embankments and trackbed over the roadway. They are deliberately narrow (350mm wide) baseboards as that is enough to run double track and sidings, it also leaves me with space in between to set up worktable and move freely.

 

 

IMG_0169.JPG

Edited by TonyMcGartland
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