Jump to content

Rate this question

Question

Hello, colleagues!

My name is Eugen, am an engineer from Moldova (former Soviet Union). I am going to migrate to Ireland and apart from main work I would like to establish a small casting workshop. Nowadays I produce some Russian (Soviet) railway models (loko72.com).

So, please, I ask Your advice if there is the demand in Ireland for production of local railway cars, local buildings (they can also be produced as remembrances), structures etc?

Thanks a lot!

IMAG1540.jpg

IMAG1496.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

27 answers to this question

Recommended Posts

  • 0

I'd say you might be a little bit late to the Party given whats being produced at the moment Eugen.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Hi Eugen,

Welcome to the site! 

Your stuff looks very impressive! Here is a list of Irish models and kits done so far 

 

Cheers!

Fran

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Hi Eugen

Welcome.  There is a new range of high quality RTR freight rolling stock from IRM (Irish Railway Models) and existing RTR passenger coaches from Murphy Models including their fine scale range of GM diesel locos.  But at the moment there are still big gaps in whats available RTR including a lot freight wagons that were in common usage on Ireland railways (e.g. CIE Bulleid corrugated open wagons, CIE H-Vans, Irish Cement curtain wagons, 20 ton and 30 ton brake vans, cattle wagons, oil tankers, etc, etc). When you say 'casting' are you thinking of resin, white metal or even 3D models in kit form or RTR?

Cheers

Noel

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
3 minutes ago, Noel said:

Hi Eugen

Welcome.  There is a new range of high quality RTR freight rolling stock from IRM (Irish Railway Models) and existing RTR passenger coaches from Murphy Models including their fine scale range of GM diesel locos.  But at the moment there are still big gaps in whats available RTR including a lot freight wagons that were in common usage on Ireland railways (e.g. CIE Bulleid corrugated open wagons, CIE H-Vans, Irish Cement curtain wagons, 20 ton and 30 ton brake vans, cattle wagons, oil tankers, etc, etc). When you say 'casting' are you thinking of resin, white metal or even 3D models in kit form or RTR?

Cheers

Noel

I produce railway resin kits for military modellers. But I could organize RTR production in any scale in cooperation with local Irish colleagues. But I need to know exactly if there is the demand for such cars (and may be buildings) among local modellers. To be profitable, every model must be sold at least 100 copies.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Hi Eugene

Welcome to the forum. I would imagine those that are currently offering RTR product to the consumer could more readily answer the question but I would suspect that if the product is good enough, competitively priced enough and enticing enough you will get the business. 

All cottage industries require a bit of good fortune and taking a shot in the dark if they are to succeed and I would say yours will be no different. Looking at your photos, you look to be producing some very impressive Soviet stuff so I don't see why that can't be transferred to the Irish market. 

Paul

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

I've always felt that the once ubiquitous Hino would find a place on a few layouts.
54165c87378e664c8006794d3b68f961.jpg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

There is little to none ready to run in n gauge. And I would be interested in n gauge.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

With that level of detail, you'd find customers here.

What would we buy 100 of?

If there was a wagon that you'd sell, say, in sets of 6, just 17 customers would break even, or 34 if they were in sets of three.

I would certainly buy maybe ten CIE cattle trucks. Anyone modelling anywhere on CIE prior to 1975 needs them, and the English ones we suffice with are nothing like CIE ones.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

I firmly believe that if there were GNRi chassis underarms, complete with standard single braking lever it would have big appeal for scratch builders who wanted to use the chassis for various bodies above.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

A six wheel chassis would suit a wide range of applications. MGWR, GSWR, GNR, DSER and NCC six-wheelers were all the same length, as were most (but not all) on the BCDR.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
11 hours ago, WRENNEIRE said:

Scan0004.thumb.jpg.5dec56659e4a136f5bf7990a402f1c28.jpg

A beauty of a coach, late survivor.

It's a GSWR second, I think; possibly a third or a composite. Still in departmental version of CIE green into the 1980s until it fell to bits. Original footboards mostly cut off, old doors and windows blocked up in places, and a new "shed door" in the middle.

They used to do this to some old coaches for PW train accommodation, much the same as a former laminate has been "botched" into a weedspray yellow thing in recent years.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Is that not an Attock MGWR profile on the end? The roof is definitely a re-issue, but a grim, yet brilliant photo

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
12 hours ago, jhb171achill said:

A six wheel chassis would suit a wide range of applications. MGWR, GSWR, GNR, DSER and NCC six-wheelers were all the same length, as were most (but not all) on the BCDR.

Seconded!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
26 minutes ago, Glenderg said:

Is that not an Attock MGWR profile on the end? The roof is definitely a re-issue, but a grim, yet brilliant photo

 

No, though this "flat" roof profile type was reasonably similar on many lines prior to about 1895. The GNR, BCDR, CBSCR, SLNCR. MGWR and GSWR equivalents only diverged significantly in profile into the 20th crntury, particularly on bogie stock.

The DSER always used a higher elliptical profile.

What categorises the above as a GSWR design is the side profile and window design and height. No original handrails survive, but these, plus the footboard brackets, would give away the design too; in particular, those of the MGWR were distinctive.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Its difficult to see demand for a kit of an Irish model exceeding 100 units. The Irish market is predominantly rtr with a very small proportion of modellers prepared to assemble a kit regardless of quality or ease of assembly.

RTR is dominated by high quality Chinese commissions by Murphy Models diesel locos and coaches  and Irish Railway Models freight stock, and a number of smaller producers such as Provincial Models, Irish Freight Models and Silverfox Models who produce small quantities of rtr models using resin & 3 D printing techniques.

The 1960-2000 scene in Southern Ireland  (CIE/Irish Rail) is reasonably well covered by rtr models and kits, Northern Ireland (NIR) less so heavily dependent on kits

The big gap in the market appears to be for models of locomotives and rolling stock introduced since 2000 and architectural models both north and south.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Yes, true..... I hate to say this, but I suspect a RTR 3-car ICR would sell...... or Mk 4 carriages....

12 hours ago, WRENNEIRE said:

PW GSWR here, number 24803 taken at Dun Laoghaire in 82

 

 

5aa47b0b53897_GSWR24803DLaoghaire82.thumb.jpg.b3903aebfa85b8dc6b9fd0bf1c461343.jpg

This beast was specially built for departmental use and isn't a conversion. The GSWR did, however, have some stock of that type of roof profile, though you'd more normally associate it with the DSER. The chassis design, however, rules it out as a DSER conversion anyway.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
11 hours ago, Mayner said:

Its difficult to see demand for a kit of an Irish model exceeding 100 units. The Irish market is predominantly rtr with a very small proportion of modellers prepared to assemble a kit regardless of quality or ease of assembly.

RTR is dominated by high quality Chinese commissions by Murphy Models diesel locos and coaches  and Irish Railway Models freight stock, and a number of smaller producers such as Provincial Models, Irish Freight Models and Silverfox Models who produce small quantities of rtr models using resin & 3 D printing techniques.

The 1960-2000 scene in Southern Ireland  (CIE/Irish Rail) is reasonably well covered by rtr models and kits, Northern Ireland (NIR) less so heavily dependent on kits

The big gap in the market appears to be for models of locomotives and rolling stock introduced since 2000 and architectural models both north and south.

Is not 1940-1960 a big RTR gap? Especially steam locos, bredin/laminate & park royal coach era, A, 101, and 113 class diesels.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
1 hour ago, jhb171achill said:

Yes, true..... I hate to say this, but I suspect a RTR 3-car ICR would sell...... or Mk 4 carriages....

Et tu, Brute? :confused:

No surely it cannot be true that the 'oracle' JB would tolerate a turbo roller-skate toy yo-yo ICR (fake train). :)  Now Mk4 forming a real train hauled by a ready supply of correct livery locomotives might sell especially for folks with layouts large enough to cope with the long length of mk4 coaches and 201 locos on gentle radius curves.

digging.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

CIE built coaches, of which there were many variants, are bound to be popular. Currently no kits available of these, and not on Murphy Models or IRM's plans for the current year at least.

Also, you will find drawings of these carriages shouldn't be too hard to find.

  • Like 1
  • Informative 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
1 hour ago, Noel said:

......................................... a turbo roller-skate toy yo-yo ICR (fake train). :)  

Best description I've seen for an ICR ever! Mind you, this oul philistine JHB would apply the term equally to De Dietrichs, Mk 4s,  26, 27 28 and 29-class railcars....!

(I won't cause fits of stone-throwing by mentioning anything built after 1967...................!)

  • Funny 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0
9 minutes ago, jhb171achill said:

Best description I've seen for an ICR ever! Mind you, this oul philistine JHB would apply the term equally to De Dietrichs, Mk 4s,  26, 27 28 and 29-class railcars....!

(I won't cause fits of stone-throwing by mentioning anything built after 1967...................!)

All is forgiven. friendsagain.gif I have plucked the ICR dagger from my chest (missed my heart by 21mm).  Welcome back into the family of proper trains, the zenith and golden era from 1930 to 1972 makeup.gif The great days of Irelands railway trains before the contamination of plastic formica super train and AEC sets, before the scalextricisation by hair dryer darts, the fibreglass seated yo-yo DMU & ICRs that spawned a dawn in the osteopathy and hearing aid industries, and the final insult, yes the meltdown of bendy lousy luasey buses on rails pretending to be trains. :):)  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 0

Noel, you're a man of great wisdom, foresight, and intellectual articulacy!  Agreed on all counts........  don't forget the 201s and  Mk 3s, but don't tell anyone here I said it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×

Important Information

Terms of Use