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GNRi1959

Omagh Goods Yard

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In the real world, straight track is much easier to put down and there would generally need to be a reasonable reason for curving things.

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Posted (edited)

That may be so, but sinuous curves are naturally very attractive to the eye(!) and straight lines are often best avoided on layouts. Likewise anything parallel to the baseboard edge.

 On the real thing, track tended to follow contours and natural features, so flowing curves are actually more common than you might think. Hence anything that softens edges, draws the eye into the scene, makes you peer around some feature in the front and so on, all help to make a layout look bigger and more interesting. 

On a narrow baseboard, it can be difficult to avoid tracks that are parallel to the edge, so going slightly diagonally is an option. Alternatively, small, non structural additions to the baseboard front can do the same thing.

Edited by David Holman
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1 hour ago, David Holman said:

On a narrow baseboard, it can be difficult to avoid tracks that are parallel to the edge, so going slightly diagonally is an option. Alternatively, small, non structural additions to the baseboard front can do the same thing.

I think going slightly diagonal should improve things, thanks

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Posted (edited)

Here at long last is the makings of the Goods workings at Omagh complete with South Eastern Finecast well-type turntable and signal box. The paper template marks the position of the Goods Store. There are two more points to add to complete and these will allow wagons to move from the outside road to the inner sidings. By the way, all track work is pinned fairly loosely  at the moment but it is the final layout design.

 

 

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Edited by GNRi1959
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Posted (edited)

Some more progress.

Added additional board unit and moved turntable position. Created more space at North end for locos to exit the yard.

Additional pointwork to be added.

 

 

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Edited by GNRi1959
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Rotating the entire track plan slightly and adding the slightest of curves to some of the sections has really enhanced the look of the layout no end. The moving of the turntable also de-clutters things too.  I’m really liking what you’ve done. 

Paul

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45 minutes ago, PaulC said:

Rotating the entire track plan slightly and adding the slightest of curves to some of the sections has really enhanced the look of the layout no end. The moving of the turntable also de-clutters things too.  I’m really liking what you’ve done. 

Paul

Thanks Paul.

There will be another siding between the turntable and good shed. The other end won't change much other than another point or possibly two.

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Jonathan, excuse my ignorance but can you explain ‘headshunt’ and are you referring to the siding next to the goods yard store.

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I'm actually looking at one of the earlier photos, Tony, which had a turntable at what I think is the narrower end. If I'm correct, the track to its right divides into two lines. If you were to run a loco from one track forward, then change points to make it back onto the adjacent line, it needs extra space if it will be transferring wagons attached to it, from one track to the other. 

I'm looking at the photo following the one showing the signal cabin.

A suggestion: in between the two turnouts left of the turntable, you might bring the furthest one away back towards the nearer one by swopping it with the short hit of straight track in between. This will lengthen the headshunt, which is the name for the section of track beyond the points, leading towards the wall. This enables more trucks to be moved across at a time.

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Posted (edited)

Jonathan you are so correct. I am aware of that and that’s the next thing on my list to change, thanks. The problem has been trying to keep pointwork clear of baseboard joints.

Edited by GNRi1959
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13 hours ago, jhb171achill said:

I'm actually looking at one of the earlier photos, Tony, which had a turntable at what I think is the narrower end. If I'm correct, the track to its right divides into two lines. If you were to run a loco from one track forward, then change points to make it back onto the adjacent line, it needs extra space if it will be transferring wagons attached to it, from one track to the other. 

I'm looking at the photo following the one showing the signal cabin.

A suggestion: in between the two turnouts left of the turntable, you might bring the furthest one away back towards the nearer one by swopping it with the short hit of straight track in between. This will lengthen the headshunt, which is the name for the section of track beyond the points, leading towards the wall. This enables more trucks to be moved across at a time.

Jonathan, I made a quick adjustment to the pointwork and brought it forward to increase the length of the headshunt. I will probably add another siding or two beside it.

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2 hours ago, jhb171achill said:

Looking good, Tony!

Thanks Jonathan.

Just ordered a few more points and believe me I'll be ordering no more.

I believe I have enough pointwork and track to keep me busy now.

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, GNRi1959 said:

Just ordered a few more points and believe me I'll be ordering no more.

I believe I have enough pointwork and track to keep me busy now.

Yes.... if you try to cram too much into a layout, there's no room for scenery! Looks just about right the way it is.

Edited by jhb171achill

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Can only agree with JB, Tony - less is more sometimes, so don't add track at the expense of scenery or the layout will end up looking crowded.

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Yes, I agree totally.

However, with the additional baseboard comes the need to extend track work also!

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And here we have the results of some change. I moved the turntable onto the extension at the rear of the shed, this same board will house a goods shed. Additional track and paintwork was placed loosely in position for some serious track laying tomorrow.

 

 

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Looking really good. The only problem I see you have is similar to mine - not being able to capture the whole layout in one shot!  xD

Paul

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Thanks Paul. To get to this stage has taken months of debate and hair pulling- worth it.

to be honest, much of the change and fine tuning came based on the advice of two members outside of the forum. Didn’t want to bore everyone to tears!

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Posted (edited)

Started drilling holes for point motors under points today, finalising track and fitting brass screws to the baseboard joints for soldering. Slow and precise work but rewarding, I hope.

Hope I am doing this right, haven't done it before;.

 

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Edited by GNRi1959
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After speaking to a few modellers at Bangor, who gave me some insight into soldering, I got my game back on track and started lifting the brass screws at my baseboard joints and opted for copper clad strips. Its the first time I ever soldered so hopefully I will only improve. Even though its not the biggest layout its modular nature means a lot of track work joints.

 

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Track laid and soldered, first loco tests look promising. Once I have cut the track work over the baseboard joints, I will be able to wire the isolated sections, wire my switches and the layout then comes to life.

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Photos?

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8 hours ago, Noel said:

Photos?

Noel, no problem - tomorrow!

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At last, something positive is happening. Although I refer to this small shunting layout at Omagh, its really takes its name from the shunting operations there. The track work is similar in many ways to the Good Store and Omagh and the large Goods building will be modelled in time. The layout measures 4.2m in length with a baseboard width of 450. Each baseboard module is 650mm long and this was deliberate for two reasons. I didn't want to start crawling underneath to wire it so each module can be wired separately by simply unclipping it and turning it up on its edge. The other reason is that I may decide, somewhere along the line to exhibit although it won't happen for some time.

To the opposite end of the Goods Store and yard will be Omagh's other goods department, the Market Branch. I'm waiting approval to go onto the property of Dunnes Stores to measure the Goods Store there, it is preserved in the car park there and its best to get permission. It is also pictured below.

I'm waiting on the arrival of an extra fine razor saw to cut the track joints and start wiring this week. Hope you like it.

 

 

 

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52 droppers now in place ready to be soldered. Lots of patience needed!

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One small thing, you know you need to make cuts in the copper clad strips to isolate the tracks and prevent a short circuit.

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15 minutes ago, irishthump said:

One small thing, you know you need to make cuts in the copper clad strips to isolate the tracks and prevent a short circuit.

Thanks, I did this soon after soldering the track. I was able to run locos in short sections but now much carry out the full wiring task to get all up and running

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I managed to get all of the droppers on my first baseboard done today. Having the baseboard in sections is a godsend because I was able to turn the board up on its edge and get at it easier. The bright afternoon soon lit the shed well and helped to. 

As I solder, I can see improvement all the time. I have started to develop a technique that works, aided with a cocktail stick to hold the droppers steady in the hole they emerge from.

More fun lies head.........

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Looking really good, your carpentry on the baseboards is first class and I must remember the cocktail stick next time I solder droppers.

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Posted (edited)

Thanks for your comments all.

Heres two pics I took. One showing the baseboard sections taken apart for soldering the droppers, one at a time. The big advantage with having the baseboards in sections is that it makes soldering and the wiring much easier. I found it impossible to solder the droppers with the baseboards flat, much easier when you have them up on their edge. The downside is the additional work to create joints and a lot of additional wiring.

Finally, the latest sign to my collection, given to me today by a work colleague who happens to make them up.

 

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Edited by GNRi1959
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More pictures taken after all under-baseboard wiring has been done. All I need to do now is connect to DPDP switches and controller and we should have a few locos running. In the meantime, the goods stock is being brought out of boxes onto a small shelf I erected - a Provincial Wagons siding! I also started working on the shell of the goods yard store in 3mm birch ply. Unfortunately I had to reduce the front of it in side as the original is twice as long.

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