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First Look at the IRM Tara!

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We have received some sample images and video of our first Tara Mines sample from our factory in China. We think it looks pretty special so far but they will get a more forensic examination when they arrive in Dublin in the coming days. Check out below. WARNING! The underskirt pics are very x-rated!!! :D
 
Please note however that this is a hastily thrown together hand assembled pre-production sample. The tooling is still to be refined and the fit and finish of the models you will receive will be much better!
 
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As you can see there is a wealth of detail in these wagons, using real springs, fine brass wire and close coupling with sprung buffers. It also has the rotating bearing caps which you can see working in this video! This bogie will also be used on our forthcoming fertiliser and 42ft flat wagons!
 
 
Over 25% of the first Tara run has been sold. Make sure you don't miss out on this groundbreaking model. Order now https://irishrailwaymodels.com/product-category/freight-stock/tara-mines/
 
We will have this sample on display at the forthcoming Wexford and Bangor shows. :) 
 
Cheers!
 
Fran
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Very impressive so far guys. :-bd

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The underframe detail looks sweet men, the vac chambers, the pipe work, brake gear and I love the springs. It really captures the bulk of the prototype. I love the bogies and the rotating axles. Provision also for 21mm. Delighted that sprung buffers are included. I don't think that I have seen a bogie wagon of that quality at that price from any manufacturer. It's a first for models in 00 especially when you look at the price that the Hornby Biomass wagons were selling for. The bar is raised again and I can see myself saying that for future releases also.

Rich,

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I hate it when people think that any model with sprung buffers is the be all and end all  - personally I think its an unnecessary expense as it is never seen in action. But rotating axels is a completely different ball game altogether - it brings a new dimension to the action of a model especially when in slow operation!  Well done lads  - superb engineering !=D

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We agree on the buffers heirflick but we’ve designed a plastic sprung buffer head with our factory that is not costing us more to make so its a win win :)

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38 minutes ago, heirflick said:

. But rotating axels is a completely different ball game altogether - 

Rotating axels are more of a skating game...

 

Another major step forward - I wonder how long before I have to stop complaining that the brakes don't work?

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18 minutes ago, BosKonay said:

We agree on the buffers heirflick but we’ve designed a plastic sprung buffer head with our factory that is not costing us more to make so its a win win :)

Sounds good. I think Fran covered this a few weeks ago, but one of the suggestions made was that in future buffer lengths might be based on 'coupled up' lengths when 'buffered up' to next wagon (i.e. slightly compressed) mode rather than a stand alone wagon where buffers would naturally be fully extended and therefore longer.  This would enable more accurate prototypical scale distances between wagons and closer coupling like some Bachmann stock.  Looking at the sample images for the Tara wagon this looks like it may be the case, is it?

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55 minutes ago, heirflick said:

I hate it when people think that any model with sprung buffers is the be all and end all  - personally I think its an unnecessary expense as it is never seen in action. But rotating axels is a completely different ball game altogether - it brings a new dimension to the action of a model especially when in slow operation!  Well done lads  - superb engineering !=D

To be honest Seamus I've seen lads in the scale four society using sprung buffers to great effect in both pushing and forward modes, when it's done right it looks mighty effective. I suppose it comes down to what type of operational movement one likes.

Rich,

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59 minutes ago, BosKonay said:

We agree on the buffers heirflick but we’ve designed a plastic sprung buffer head with our factory that is not costing us more to make so its a win win :)

That's excellent Bos - no complaints on that here!:tumbsup:

26 minutes ago, RedRich said:

To be honest Seamus I've seen lads in the scale four society using sprung buffers to great effect in both pushing and forward modes, when it's done right it looks mighty effective. I suppose it comes down to what type of operational movement one likes.

Rich,

Any vids on that Rich? - love to see that.

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50 minutes ago, Broithe said:

 

Another major step forward - I wonder how long before I have to stop complaining that the brakes don't work?

Have you not seen the  IRM Tower motto Jim?.....'The impossible we can do at once - miracles take a little longer!':rolleyes:

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26 minutes ago, heirflick said:

That's excellent Bos - no complaints on that here!:tumbsup:

Any vids on that Rich? - love to see that.

I was at a Scalefourum Seamus and a layout had stock with sprung buffers. They had Markits  brass sprung buffers fitted to MK1's and wizard models fitted to wagons. It looked amazing when shunting . Just imagine having to back up a set of Tara's or Ferts buffer to buffer and you will start to come around to the idea. On the real wagons they rarely touched buffer to buffer running forwards. It is a nice touch and as Stephen has said if it isn't costing anymore than standard fixed buffers then it's a win win. The SLW class 24 is fitted with a prototypical working set of  sprung buffers.

Rich ,

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3 hours ago, heirflick said:

I hate it when people think that any model with sprung buffers is the be all and end all  - personally I think its an unnecessary expense as it is never seen in action. But rotating axels is a completely different ball game altogether - it brings a new dimension to the action of a model especially when in slow operation!  Well done lads  - superb engineering !=D

As Bosko said above, Shem, there's no added cost to using sprung buffers - contrary to what some other producers say! As for being unnecessary, as Rich pointed out, they do actually come into play with coupling systems that feature delayed action uncoupling (AJ couplings, etc.). :)

 

2 hours ago, Noel said:

Sounds good. I think Fran covered this a few weeks ago, but one of the suggestions made was that in future buffer lengths might be based on 'coupled up' lengths when 'buffered up' to next wagon (i.e. slightly compressed) mode rather than a stand alone wagon where buffers would naturally be fully extended and therefore longer.  This would enable more accurate prototypical scale distances between wagons and closer coupling like some Bachmann stock.  Looking at the sample images for the Tara wagon this looks like it may be the case, is it?

Don't know where this odd theory has come from, Noel - buffer length is the same regardless of whether a wagon is sitting in the middle of a train or standing by itself. On fitted freight trains, the only instances where buffers will be constantly compressed is when a train is being propelled as part of a shunting maneuver... or if something has gone wrong! 

It's slightly different with some coaching stock - buffers can be retracted on stock that uses buckeye couplings, for example, as the buckeye also doubles as a buffer (buckeye is the standard North American coupling, hence their locos and rolling stock don't feature separate buffers at all). The buffers are extended at either end of the rake as the loco is usually attached to the lead coach with a screw-link coupling, and buffers on individual coaches would be extended if the rake is being broken up or reassembled and they're being shunted individually. Older stock, such as Cravens, Park Royals, etc. were fitted with screw-links so didn't feature retractable buffers.

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3 hours ago, Broithe said:

But rotating axels is a completely different ball game altogether

But all axles are supposed to rotate unless yer second name is Foley..?

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6 minutes ago, Glenderg said:

 

But all axles are supposed to rotate unless yer second name is Foley..?

There's axles and there's axels...

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Posted (edited)

Amazing job guys. Model really captures the heft of the wagon shape. The axels are the dogs danglies and love the coupling hook on the model too. Just top work.

Imagining what those axel caps would looking like on a MM loco in some sort of bogie refit.:drool:

Can I ask what you are going to do with the lid options? The new round on these red oxide, the corrugated on the blue? Another run for the point top in the 90s brown rust like the ballasts? It's only lately you see the wagons in red oxide as the maintenance routine seems to have really stepped up in the past 10 years.

Edited by Railer
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1 hour ago, Railer said:

Amazing job guys. Model really captures the heft of the wagon shape. The axels are the dogs danglies and love the coupling hook on the model too. Just top work.

Imagining what those axel caps would looking like on a MM loco in some sort of bogie refit.:drool:

Can I ask what you are going to do with the lid options? The new round on these red oxide, the corrugated on the blue? Another run for the point top in the 90s brown rust like the ballasts? It's only lately you see the wagons in red oxide as the maintenance routine seems to have really stepped up in the past 10 years.

Hi Graham, many thanks for the kind words. Our initial impressions are favourable, but still needs a thourogh going over when it arrives in Dublin in the next week or so.

Re lids, the round one on the sample is the one that has been in use for the last 20 odd years and the peaked top one is the latest. We’re going for round on this run as it gives it the longest operational span. They were red oxide underneath, with weathering turning them bauxite. The blue ones will get the correct corrugated lid when we do a run of them.  The peaked lid run would depend on demand a few years down the line but we will certainly do the blues too.

cheers,

Fran

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Posted (edited)

Absolutely Superb- well done again gentlemen, the rotating axle caps really capture the actions of the prototype,

You have really put the main model manufacturer's to shame with this standard and level of detail and accuracy.:tumbsup:

And an order has now been placed........

Edited by ttc0169
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Does this mean that we have cylindrical bearings rather than pinpoint ones?

I take it there's not a huge increase in drag - it's noticeable with things like the Hornby lighted Pullmans where the axle contacts add a bit of extra resistance - maybe something to consider if you have slopes, etc?

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21 hours ago, Glenderg said:

 

But all axles are supposed to rotate unless yer second name is Foley..?

 

Aviary Photo_131661435574331836.png

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ha!

@broithe  - The axle goes from 2mm to the shank at the top of 1.1mm in diameter, so the bearing amount is very similar to previous wagons, but it'll be benchpressed in HQ thoroughly through some seriously twisty track. Hopefully the image below illustrates it. R. 

 

Bearing.JPG

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2 hours ago, Glenderg said:

ha!

@broithe  - The axle goes from 2mm to the shank at the top of 1.1mm in diameter, so the bearing amount is very similar to previous wagons, but it'll be benchpressed in HQ thoroughly through some seriously twisty track. Hopefully the image below illustrates it. R. 

 

Bearing.JPG

Looks good - do the brakes work?

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At least you asked during the week of miracles, I'd have taken it seriously otherwise :P

 

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Bless me father for I am about to sin. :dig:

Believe it or not I have never ever even seen the prototypes of these wagons in real life, they are not buried anywhere in my nostalgia memory, the word 'Tara' only triggers school day memories of broaches, and to add insult to injury these wagons have bogies, fitted brakes and are far too modern for my era - BUT 'bless me father' for I am weak, and going to have to have a rake of these, they look so dam good I can no longer contain my modelling lust . . . will I forever "rot in the the bogie of eternal stench" for my deviation?  Shall loose coupled two axle wagons ever forgive me for wandering from the path of fish plate purity? :) 

 

 

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Posted (edited)

:bishopbrennan:

 

You are forgiven, sin in peace...

Edited by Glenderg
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14 minutes ago, Glenderg said:

:bishopbrennan:

 

You are forgiven, sin in peace...

Ok, but I shudder at the thought of what my penance might be . . . :dig:

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Posted (edited)

Five Hail Red Oxides and Two Our Taras, and a Glory Be to 21mm?

Edited by Glenderg
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4 hours ago, Glenderg said:

Five Hail Red Oxides and Two Our Taras, and a Glory Be to 21mm?

 

Our Taras, which art in Navan,

Hallowed be thy train. 

Thy loco comes, thy will be hauled,

South to the port of Dublin.

Give us this day our daily ore,

And forgive the odd rough shunt,

Through North Wall yard,

And along Alexandra Road. 

And be led not unto the scrapline,

But deliver that zinc again.

 

:bishopbrennan:

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Posted (edited)
11 hours ago, Glenderg said:

Five Hail Red Oxides and Two Our Taras, and a Glory Be to 21mm?

Phew thats a relief. :) The ultimate penance of Brass, Solder and Flux might have been more than I could bare.

6 hours ago, Garfield said:

 

:bishopbrennan:

St Patrick, that's classic

Edited by Noel

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Our Tara sample has reached Dublin and we have been running the rule over it. We're not too keen on the institutional cyan the factory used, but thankfully the model looks delicious in the flesh! It is a hastily assembled sample as these first samples tend to be, and a couple of minor refinements are required, but overall it's a stunner. 

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Lots of fine detail underneath and kinematic coupling system on show. The NEM pockets are at the correct height, so no need for cranked couplings this time round! :) Buffers are also sprung.

 

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Yes, they are real springs on the brake gear! Lots of nice brass wire for the brake pipework too. 

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The bogies with the rotating axle caps. We're delighted to say that the sample is a lovely free roller with this set up. Also, 21mm conversion can be achieved by just pulling the wheelsets out to the correct gauge. The actuator is missing from this sample but will be included on the production models. 

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There is a couple of small things that need refining, but overall we are delighted by the first sample. These minor adjustments will not affect the delivery schedule. We will have this model on our stand at the Wexford show this Sunday, as well as the Bangor show in a few weeks for you all to see. 

We're well over the 25% sold mark on these beauties already. Make sure you don't miss out! www.irishrailwaymodels.com/shop

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Looks like another truly exceptional product in the offing. Well done guys. Looking forward to the end of Q2. hyper.gif 

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Thought it was the early blue livery gone wrong.:rolleyes:

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