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GNRi1959

Track Cutting Razor Saw

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The best method is a dremel with a flexidrive and a thin cutting disc. I use an Aldi one and have had it in use for the last 6 years! 

I nearly splashed out on a new Dremel with all the bells and whistles but can't justify the cost against the cheap one. I use mine at least twice a week for nearly a day at a time building layouts.

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8 minutes ago, Dave said:

The best method is a dremel with a flexidrive and a thin cutting disc. I use an Aldi one and have had it in use for the last 6 years! 

I nearly splashed out on a new Dremel with all the bells and whistles but can't justify the cost against the cheap one. I use mine at least twice a week for nearly a day at a time building layouts.

Agree 100%.  Carborundum disc on a mini drill is your only man for cutting track. It is by far the easiest and least labour intensive, and accurate.

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Zuron make a good tool for just such a job. It comes in the form of a pair of pliers - lovely, clean cut followed by a few strokes of a fine file to tidy up the end.

Stephen

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8 minutes ago, GNRi1959 said:

any links to the favoured tool?

https://www.mfacomodrills.com/mini_drills/drills.html

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Rotacraft-Carborundum-Cutting-10-Silver/dp/B007RC5B7Q

http://www.marksmodels.com/?pid=18800

https://www.mfacomodrills.com/mini_drills/drills.html

If you already have a modellers mini drill you also need a spindle to mount the discs on, but you can also buy complete kits like some of the above.

 

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14 minutes ago, StevieB said:

Zuron make a good tool for just such a job. It comes in the form of a pair of pliers - lovely, clean cut followed by a few strokes of a fine file to tidy up the end.

Stephen

Apologies Stevie, I'm not a fan of Zuron pliers for cutting track rails. Two broke on me, could have lost an eye with one, but luckily I was wearing goggles, they are not really designed to cut material as thick as code 75 or code 100 rail. They are also less precise than micro disc cutters. They are however great for cutting thiner metal materials such as cabling, wire grab rails for rolling stock, plastic, thin bits of brass, etc, etc. Carborundum disc causes zero distortion unlike pliers once they get older (i.e. easier to get fish plates to slide on after cutting).

Edited by Noel

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If using a cutting disc directly in a drill that is of a larger diameter than the disc, the cut will be at a slight angle to the vertical. This can be avoided by using a narrow-handled flexi-drive, of course. However, if you end up with two cuts at a join that are angled away from each other, then there will be a permanent open gap at the top of the join, giving a 'click' that may not be the end of the world, of course.

If you are using the disc in a drill directly, then having the drill over the track that will be used, rather than the piece that is being removed, will result in joins that are closed at the top.

 

One extra benefit of using a cutting disc is that you are much less likely to bend the rail and cutting can also be done in much more constricted spaces than with a saw.

Edited by Broithe

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On 4/17/2018 at 12:58 PM, Broithe said:

If using a cutting disc directly in a drill that is of a larger diameter than the disc, the cut will be at a slight angle to the vertical. This can be avoided by using a narrow-handled flexi-drive, of course. However, if you end up with two cuts at a join that are angled away from each other, then there will be a permanent open gap at the top of the join, giving a 'click' that may not be the end of the world, of course.

If you are using the disc in a drill directly, then having the drill over the track that will be used, rather than the piece that is being removed, will result in joins that are closed at the top.

 

One extra benefit of using a cutting disc is that you are much less likely to bend the rail and cutting can also be done in much more constricted spaces that with a saw.

Some interesting posts and advice here, thanks all.

I found this one on eBay today and thought it good value at £21

 

 

Screen Shot 2018-04-19 at 22.32.58.png

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