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KMCE

Class 495 Build

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Right........

 

Now that I have a properly printed model it's time to get started on construction.

As mentioned in the earlier thread, I was proposing to use the high level kit as the chassis under the printed model, so made a start on the kit.

The kit has parts for OO, EM & P4, so there are a few additional etches.

20180623_205833.thumb.jpg.35db7bf6f29338f32a5e056ebf237b22.jpg

 

Frames cut out of fret and bearings set in rear axle position – hornblocks for forward axle.

20180623_212650.thumb.jpg.ea7f79bb7f433fb600a81816de33e9ec.jpg

 

I built the chassis up using the P4 components in the kit to arrive here:

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However........

Due to the 21mm gauge there was a lot of slack between the wheels and frames which was causing problems with how the loco sat on the track - the side play was excessive and to be honest the chassis was not the right shape anyway, so I decided to start again and build my own frames.

20180629_113111.thumb.jpg.b528896c756583e5ce979b9f1e5595af.jpg

 More reflective of the actual loco, and allows me to correct the spacing to prevent excess sideways play.

We get this:

20180629_155533.thumb.jpg.b518d1247b8b2829d66058055e4115cd.jpg

 

Great - right shape, compensation in, ride height set - now for rods.

 

Ahh....wheel base in the kit is longer than 495!  Thus coupling rods are no use, so I had to make my own.

After using all the expletives I know (many times) and three goes later, we now have coupling rods - sort of!

20180706_101631.thumb.jpg.25aedbf832022a75f3dc77027bce5757.jpg

Not as elegant as the etched ones, but the difference in length can clearly be seen.  Original RTR rods top, kit etched second, mine bottom.  No lubricating pot, but I may be able to bodge something together.

 

Now we are starting to get to a point where cylinders and connecting rods can be added, brakes fashioned, pick ups added and hopefully we will have a completed chassis.

I hope to use parts of the kit to add detail to all of this, particularly in the cab area which will be very visible.

 

More later.....

 

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Hi KMCE

'expletives' a very handy modeller device- somehow by multiple use it all works out OK in the end!

Looking Good

Eoin

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Progress for today.

 

The new rods were binding slightly, so it was back onto the loco box to move the hornblocks properly in line. 

20180707_140922.thumb.jpg.bdaf3df92e7b96390e9d93edc4205939.jpg

 

20180707_140942.thumb.jpg.7403b5e64af15c0df680d67269856f8e.jpg

 

The axle posts allow the connecting rods set the correct distance and then its a matter of soldering in the horn blocks again.

 

20180707_161145.thumb.jpg.cfe6c7dd9553cda8f1af1b695dedd22b.jpg

 

Relatively easily sorted, and now the chassis rolls properly without binding.

 

Brakes were added from the kit and modified to suit the actual loco.  Brakes are fixed to the 1.5mm crossing rod, which means they can swing out of the way to allow access to the wheels, while normally they can sit close to the wheel as per the prototype.

Sliding rod supports from the kit were split and soldered into position using the cylinders as a guide.

 

Next up was the gearbox which is formed from the kit etches folded up.  All holes need to be gently opened with broaches to the correct sizes for shafts and bushes.  Bushes were soldered in for the drive axle and assembly can commence.

20180707_190254.thumb.jpg.4aa10c9ce24b2284b703c45a82f262a6.jpg

 

And this is where we hit a snag.  When assembling the gearbox onto the drive shaft, it appears the gear on the drive axle (large one above with brass core) is a fraction to large to allow it mesh with the idler.  No sequence of assembly allowed any space, so I think it will need a call to Chris in High Level Kits for advice.

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Gearbox connection to the drive axle - less the drive gear.  This may need some lateral support as the space between the frames is much more than the kit envisaged, so without some fixing, the gearbox could slip.  Perhaps the motor fixed in the boiler may prevent movement - I'll see how it goes.

 

Continued on with other work such as motor into the boiler area, opening of the footplate to allow the gearbox through, and adding the cylinders.

 

We are getting to a rather nice looking loco....20180707_201515.thumb.jpg.05a7c25da7fb1b0f1c7b40c698df41b5.jpg

20180707_201523.thumb.jpg.b265b98fb3400a35f0fae665aa7bbccb.jpg

The wider frames move the cylinders out which gives a rather strong looking stance - shot from above showing how the cylinders sit in relation to the footplate.

20180707_201510.thumb.jpg.f91e45ddec4abcad33192793a058a043.jpg

 

Very pleased with progress & its now starting to look more like the prototype.

 

Ken

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That's the little loco that shunted Allmans Distillery in West Cork, and was bought by the GSR, yes?

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Yes.  The note on the drawing I have from IRRS states:

"Purchased from Messrs Allman & Co. Ltd, Bandon for use on Anderson's and Victoria Quays"

 

And while I have you, you being the Oracle on all things Livery, I have a note from the "Good Book" (Clements & Mc Mahon) that it maintained it's manufacturers paint scheme of Olive Green, lined in black & yellow with red frames.  Whilst the photo is in B&W, there is no indication of colour variations or lining?

Your thoughts?

 

Ken

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Hi KMCE

In the 'good book' photo, one can just make out the lining on the cab side around the numberplate, and on the sand/tool boxes- tool box top is black also? the links below give some idea as to how Packetts were lined which could help you - the last photo in the first link would seem a good starting point with the black lining and then add the yellow??

https://www.martynbane.co.uk/peckett/working/inservice.htm

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Peckett_and_Sons_railway_locomotives

Eoin

 

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Ken

That’s absolutely correct. The thing never had a repaint in its entire life! Along with the 800 class trio, it’s the solitary engine that the GSR didn’t paint grey!

The exact shade of green is unknown, but if it were possible to research in England what the makers generally used, you’d be ok with that. The only thing the GSR did was to add a number plate, and since the engine was never repainted, it’s probable that the number plate was just unpainted metal too.

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Ken

That’s absolutely correct. The thing never had a repaint in its entire life! Along with the 800 class trio, it’s the solitary engine that the GSR didn’t paint grey!

The exact shade of green is unknown, but if it were possible to research in England what the makers generally used, you’d be ok with that. The only thing the GSR did was to add a number plate, and since the engine was never repainted, it’s probable that the number plate was just unpainted metal too.

Those Peckett photos above would probably be correct, but in GSR days s heavy layer of weathering, almost obliterating the livery as in some photos above, would be more appropriate!

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Eoin,

Many thanks for the links.  There are a few images in there which will provide some indication of how she would have looked both new and old.  Not having tried any lining, this should be quite a challenge.....

 

JHB,

Really appreciate the input, and I would agree that what ever the finish, a heavy level of weathering and toning down of the paintwork will be required.  She will make a poor looking relative to the better looking locos to come.  However, it should provide some very atmospheric photos with some heavily weathered and run down wagons.

 

Will keep you posted on progress.

 

Regards,

Ken

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Hi Ken

A fantastic aid to lining- by Wild Swan Publications - 'A Modeller's Handbook Of Painting And Lining' by Ian Rathbone, and Wild Swan's first publication of this type in full colour.....

Truly a must have item in the toolbox

ISBN 978 1 905184 54 5

Eoin

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Well....

Touched base with Chris in High Level and it turns out I have the wrong final drive gear - it should have 20 teeth, mine has 23, so new one on its way in the post. 

Good time to put this one to one side for a short while and start something new.

 

Eoin,

Many thanks for that link - I got the book.  That chap takes painting seriously!!! 😜

It'll take some time before I get to that level, if ever, but fascinating information none the less.

 

 

Regards,

Ken

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