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GNRi1959

Goods Yard Building

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Working from the original GNRi Engineers drawings of Omagh, the Goods Yard building has a 4mm scale footprint of 760mm x 280mm. Thats a lot of building on a small layout. I am sure its quite acceptable to use some modellers licence to make it work better. 

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Over 2' X 1' in old money and bigger than anything on my 7mm scale layouts...

 One option is to make it low relief. You could even extend track through the building to a fiddle yard off scene, which would help improve capacity.

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David, I have sliced the footprint diagonally to save space and it's still huge. I'll keep my thinking cap on.......

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Pick a smaller GNR(I) Goods Shed from elsewhere. You're not exhibiting so modellers licence is applicable. 

A massive shed like what you propose above will dominate the scene to the detriment of the overall visual. 

R

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The gable wall of Omagh Goods Shed was a real landmark structure.

Why not model the building in low relief as a background structure as you did on both of your earlier layouts?

It does not matter if the shed is only long enough to take one or two wagons, the interesting  section where all the action takes place is around the signal box between the platform ends and overbridge at the North end of the station.

You could always reduce the shed to HO (1:87) proportions to increase the illusion of depth.

577830494_OmaghGoodsShed30112018.thumb.jpg.eb7a1062146b348327713eb85c9da00b.jpg

 

Edited by Mayner
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12 hours ago, Mayner said:

The gable wall of Omagh Goods Shed was a real landmark structure.

Why not model the building in low relief as a background structure as you did on both of your earlier layouts?

 

 

John, post 1955 that gable was removed after strong winds lifted the roof. The gable was lowered considerably and re-covered in corrugated sheets

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Interesting, Tony - that would have been during my dad’s time as District Engineer in Enniskillen. 

Edited by jhb171achill
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Cut my plywood baseboards this afternoon to form my embankment along the North Cabin. In this very area my grandfather had a nissan hut which was his permanent way store, he was the foreman ganger. Beside him was the Carpenters store which was occupied by Billy Caldwell. Joe McGrew, the shunter had names for all the sidings - and he still remembers how many wagons they could hold - Middle Road (42) - Convent Siding (16) - Cattle Beach (19) - Down Road (18) - Up Straight 12) - Outside Road (12) - Derry Siding (26) - The Gullet (20)

 

20181130_153203.jpg

20181130_153145.jpg

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Whats the best method of forming an embankment between two levels of ply?

I like the look of the paris plaster rolls - whats your choice?

Edited by GNRi1959

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White insulation board cut to shape with hot wire, glued to ply with pva, then covered with plaster cloth. When shaped plaster cloth dry paint brown using water based household paint. Then cover with various static grass layers of varying shades of green, straw colours. Alternatively traditional scatter material but static grass is way superior. Brown paint before coverage essential to stop white showing through thin areas of grass or around edges. Not the only way by any means. Many many years the old methods of chicken wire, rolled up clumps of news paper and paper mache worked but very labour intensive and time consuming. 

Strongly recommend this type of landscaping is done BEFORE track or ballast is laid. 

Edited by Noel
ytpo

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There are several different methods each have have their own merits.

On Keadue I used expanded polystyrene covered with plaster bandage and Woodland Scenics scatter for cuttings and embankments. The main advantage of of using polystyrene is that you have good control over the final contours and its reasonably solid for planting trees and post and wire fences. Main disadvantage is that its very messy if you cut carve it indoors.

 

sDSCF1913.JPG.d9aad03f1432577c3ad629f23932fb91.JPG DSCF4047.JPG.aec33f70fa941c3c9fa122cb5a9bfc35.JPG

http://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/94655-hillsideembankment-best-way-to-make/

I have also formed embankments on open frame baseboards (ply or mdf baseboard surface only under track or roadways) using card/paper strip technique again with plaster bandage and Woodlands Scenic scatter material. Main advantage, light very little mess in construction, good access underneath for wiring, installing point motors

1294256932_ModelsPortarlington002.thumb.jpg.ba83f15d0a6554fb0d2717e961ecd262.jpg.

1579336333_mypicturesbackupfile2004386.thumb.jpg.1a61c0c609bf83862da43b43f9c53001.jpgbankments formed from cardboard 

 

 

 

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Weaving cardboard strips would work well, especially as you only need things like cereal packets and a hot glue gun. Glue in verticals and then weave in horizontals. A covering of plaster, with some PVA [for flexibility] and poster paint [grey brown] means any chips do not show up white plaster.

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Noel, John and David - these are excellent examples and I am much the wiser for it. Doing it this way gives more depth to the layout.You will start to understand why I have had so many false starts- I've learned the hard way and just got up and started again. 

I think I need to complete the back scene before I start my embankments as I have some embankments against the back scene.

 

 

 

Edited by GNRi1959

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Good idea. It the same as painting a picture - background first and subsequent layers on top as you move to the foreground.

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Here is the final part of my baseboards that I wanted to include. Its the raised roadway above and behind the Goods Store. Traffic came in from the road above and drove downhill to the rear of the track work. Here there was access for Scotts Excelsior to reverse their lorries into position and take off meal from wagons above. In early days this was loose grain and in latter years bagged grain and meal was taken off closed vans and loaded onto lorries below.

Big question - 3mm cork or not? I have it already in storage.....

 

20181207_160025.jpg

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Finally completed the baseboards and roadway leading to the place where Scotts drew loose grain below the track level in Omagh. I also fashioned the approach to the cattle dock. Awaiting some plaster bandage now, all track just sitting loosely.......

 

Scotts.jpg

cattle.jpg

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Tony:

The different levels make it much more visually interesting compared to a conventional flat baseboard and helps to make sense of the unusual and distinctive split level goods/shed grain store.

The track that leads from the y turnout into the goods shed should be long enough for a loco and at least one or two wagons otherwise it will be difficult to run round while shunting the yard.

The low relief goods shed looks really effective and there is no doubt that the model is based on Omagh.

I would be inclined to to curve the backscene behind the shed rather than leave it at a 90 angle.

 

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John, your comments are welcome.

Yes, the track is just sitting there and I will make sure everything works before fixing - thats why it is taking so long.

 

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