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Bogie Wagons –Container & Timber

[This entry was originally posted on the old site.]

With thanks to MV038, IE201 and others for their previous posting on the above type wagons. I decided I’ll have to have a go and based the models on what has been already been done by others with a few of my own additions.

Collecting Hornby 60’ wagons and cutting the ones down to 47’ for Container use was the first stage. I noted the difficulty in getting a good join between the sawn wagon parts and after a few goes I hit on this method which gave me a “true meet” between the 2 half’s.

Bogiewagons006.jpg

I placed the 2 parts to be joined on an old steel ruler, applied Epoxy Resin (Z-Poxy 5 –minutes).

Bogiewagons001.jpg

I used bulldog clips to hold the 2 parts together and other clips to hold the body to the steel ruler to keep it flat.

You should end up with a good strong join.

Bogiewagons007.jpg

Once the first one was completed, it was down to assembly line practice.

Bogiewagons008.jpg

 

Buffers were made from plasticard with a brass pipe shaft inside Evergreen Tube 3.2 mm (Code 224).

 

Bogiewagons011-1.jpg

Undercoat and then test run

BogieWagons002-1.jpg

 

I also included a couple of pocket wagons I had resprayed and identified the potental problem with Dapol and old Hornby couplings.

BogieWagons006-1.jpg

Timber Wagons are more of a challenge. Working from what others had done, along with copies of Wagons drawings (thanks to 3wheeler) and closely examining available photograph I came up with the following construction method.

Bogiewagons009.jpg

Plasticard with Evergreen Channel 3.2mm (Code 264) 0.4 x 2.0 strips (Code 114) were used.

Bogiewagons010.jpg

The ends were covered with the 3.2 mm channel.

BogieWagons0022.jpg

BogieWagons007-1.jpg

They were heated with a hair dryer to mould into the shape required.

 

I concluded from the drawings that 5 pallets with upright stanchions at each corner where fitted across the body of the 60’ wagons.

 

BogieWagons001-1.jpg

These were made from plasticard, channel, strips and Evergreen square tube 3.2 mm (Code 252) and then attached to the body. Small piping is placed into the square tubes to bring them up to the correct height. Brake wheels (brass etches from Hursts) were fitted to each side of the wagon.

 

Awaiting more parts before completing the build and moving onto the painting stage.

201012-08BogieWagons-ContainerTimber.jpg

 

 

Wagons painted in MIR red Oxide.

201012-08BogieWagons-ContainerTimber19.jpg

Wagons loaded

201012-08BogieWagons-ContainerTimber210.jpg

Paint and transfers completed. I loaded the containers with lead airgun pellets for weight.

Timber wagons painted.

201012-08BogieWagons-ContainerTimber311.jpg

Timber loads were built around foam squares to reduce the overweight and to stop these wagons being too heavy.

201012-08BogieWagons-ContainerTimber412.jpg

Wagons loaded.

201012-08BogieWagons-ContainerTimber414.jpg

Container Wagons in action.

201012-09Boggiewagons-completed15.jpg

Timber train passing.

Collages16.jpg

 

Close up of the pocket wagons.

Boggiewagons-completed01317.jpg

The Wagon Project took a lot longer than I had anticipated and I am happy to move on to my Hunslet rake project.

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It was always my ambition to build a Hunslet Rake in its introductory colours but by the time I got round to it Ian at MIR was sold out of kits. When the “old site” sponsored a re issue of Hunslets, I jumped at the chance and gathered up donor coaches and a Bachmann Class 20 chassis to go with it.

001HunsletRake.jpg

I had built a Hunslet before (my 1st kit) so it was reasonably straightforward. Coaches were a matter of re sprays but I needed a driving trailer.

002Drivingtrailer.jpg

A bit of extra work cutting out as well as blocking a window.

 

The Bill Bedford bending jig came in handy for the hand rails.

005handrails.jpg

Getting ready for painting

006Hunsletrake.jpg

“Sandy” testing the air conditioned streamlined model.

HunsletRake017.jpg

Fitting lights to the Hunslet went OK after some excellent advice from George.

HunsletRake018.jpg

HunsletRake015.jpg

Only noticed the red wire through the window after I took the photograph

Hunsletrake009.jpg

 

Thanks to “Hunslet” and others on the makeup of a Hunslet Rake and its colour scheme.

Hunsletrake011.jpg

Drew the line at 5 coaches, I’m running out of room!

Hunsletrake016.jpg

Sandy’s ready for a test drive.

Hunsletrake017-1.jpg

Old and new liveries

Hunsletrake019.jpg

Hunsletrake018-1.jpg

 

Now I’ll have to put lights on the 102.

Hunsletrake021.jpg

 

Hunsletrake021.jpg

Next project looming!

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It was always my ambition to build a Hunslet Rake in its introductory colours but by the time I got round to it Ian at MIR was sold out of kits. When the “old site” sponsored a re issue of Hunslets, I jumped at the chance and gathered up donor coaches and a Bachmann Class 20 chassis to go with it.

001HunsletRake.jpg

I had built a Hunslet before (my 1st kit) so it was reasonably straightforward. Coaches were a matter of re sprays but I needed a driving trailer.

002Drivingtrailer.jpg

 

A bit of extra work cutting out as well as blocking a window.

005handrails.jpg

The Bill Bedford bending jig came in handy for the hand rails.

006Hunsletrake.jpg

Getting ready for painting

Hunsletrake013.jpg

 

“Sandy” testing the air conditioned streamlined model.

HunsletRake017.jpg

Fitting lights to the Hunslet went OK after some excellent advice from George.

 

Only noticed the red wire through the window after I took the photograph

HunsletRake018.jpg

002Drivingtrailer.jpg

Thanks to “Hunslet” and others on the makeup of a Hunslet Rake and its colour scheme.

Hunsletrake009.jpg

Hunsletrake011.jpg

Drew the line at 5 coaches, I’m running out of room!

Hunsletrake016.jpg

Sandy’s ready for a test drive.

Hunsletrake017-1.jpg

Old and new liveries

Hunsletrake018-1.jpg

Hunsletrake019.jpg

 

Now I’ll have to put lights on the 102.

 

 

 

Next project looming!

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Class 22000 3 Car Set –the final stage.

 

Class22000transfertime004.jpg

 

Class22000Transfertime006.jpg

Transfer time, supplied by Studio Scale Models along with some very helpful advice from Des.

Class22000EndoftheLine002.jpg

After spraying, glazing, fitting of hand rails, and window wipers it was time for the final assembly and test run.

Class22000EndoftheLine006.jpg

The front valances continued to give me problems as they don’t provide a smooth unbroken line from the cab area. Also the depth of them did not look right so I cut of the bottom 2.5 mm, including the front curve, but I think it now looks more like the real thing.

Class22000EndoftheLine020.jpg

It was great to see it finally on rails and with the Bachmann motor it is a very smooth runner.

 

Class22000EndoftheLine022.jpg

The original front top light looks very pale in comparison to the new LED’s

Class22000EndoftheLine024.jpg

The project started back in March although the gathering up of donors and parts needed started before that. If I was to do another one there would be many things I would do differently but it’s unlikely I’ll tackle another one. I spent a long time getting the lights to fit into the front space and ended up using light bulbs at the end of plastic tubes. Then I noticed on this site a reference to using optical fibre (I think it was George who said he was going to try them). I got some and placed them in the plastic tubes. It improved the brightness of the red lights are they are not as strong as the white ones. What a great invention, now you only need one white and one red bulb and run your optical fibre from them and they don’t have to be in the front cab area.

th_Class22000clip.jpg

A brief movie clip of the 22000 in action. [First time I have tried this -hope it works]

 

Class22000EndoftheLine025.jpg

I started this project with a photo of a Class 22000 with a Virgin Voyager in front of it. To finish I’ll show the finished Class 2200 alongside the Virgin Voyager.

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Fantastic work there Kirley, bought the Bill Bedford bending jig myself but find using a pair if plyers just as good.

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IE Cement Wagons

 

CementWagons001a.jpg

I got some of the last MIR kits back in April 01at the Bangor show but have only got around to making them.

 

CementWagons004.jpg

CementWagons002.jpg

 

I suppose that will be the extent of my cement train unless some other manufacturer decides to produce them.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

UTA WT Class, Coaches & Buses

 

UTAWTcoachesbuses007.jpg

This is my first go at a WT Class done in UTA livery.

Unfortunately during a test run one the valve gear screw came out and mangled the rods. The chassis is back with Hornby and I’m waiting and waiting for its return.

UTAWTcoachesbuses006.jpg

 

I did five coaches, all ex LMS stock.

UTAWTcoachesbuses005.jpg

One of the buses is a Jim Poots model and the other a TS8 which I adapted myself.

 

UTAWTcoachesbuses004.jpg

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UTA Spoil Wagons

 

Background

 

 

The building of the foreshore section of the M2 between Whitla Street, Belfast and Greencastle was a major civil engineering project. It involved reclamation of a large part of Belfast Lough and the transport of more than 4 million tons of fill, by rail, from Magheramorne near Larne. Work started in 1966 with the road opening in 1973.

The decision to use rail haulage meant that severe congestion on, and damage to, the streets were obviated. The Ministry of Development purchased 70 railway wagons of 30 ton capacity. They were of a side discharge type manually operated. This allowed for three trains of 20 wagons each with 10 spare wagons, to allow for repairs, without reducing train capacity. Each train was hauled by two steam locomotives. Railway sidings and two 500 ft long high loading platforms were constructed at the quarry at Magherarnorne to permit direct loading by the 30 ton dump trucks used at the quarry face. At the foreshore motorway site a 1½ mile long railway siding was constructed alongside the existing Northern Ireland Railways line. The side discharge wagons were emptied directly on to the foreshore and the material was spread by four D9 Caterpillar dozers. The Northern Ireland Railway Company was responsible for all rail operations.

 

The 70 spoil wagons were made specifically for this contract by Cravens Ltd. and initially involved the UTA and then NIR when they took over railway operations in N Ireland. This contract gave N Ireland the distinction of having the last working steam operations in the UK as the WT Class (Jeeps) were used. Later NIR kept some wagons for PW workings.

Models

UTASpoilWagons009.jpg

 

UTASpoilWagons007.jpg

 

 

The inspiration for making models of these unique wagons came from Colm Flanagan, well known for his model making who made one and put it up on the rmweb site. (See http://www.rmweb.co.uk/co...pic/39866-a-spoil-wagon/).

UTASpoilWagons012.jpg

UTASpoilWagons011.jpg

 

I used Dapol wagons and Plasticard strips for the construction.

UTASpoilWagons014.jpg

UTASpoilWagons015.jpg

 

Leslie McAllister (Provincial Wagons) has expressed an interest in doing a limited run of these wagons. He said “I’m sufficiently encouraged to get my guy to master a kit and run off a hundred or so. Maybe in time for next Bangor in April”.

UTASpoilWagons013.jpg

 

 

 

 

I hope he does as I never want to see plasticard strips again. There was a total of 92 separate pieces of plasticard per wagon.

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Mark 4 Train

After getting a Murphy’s Intercity 201 I had to get a matching train.

[Mk4009.jpg

I decided on 3 Standard Class Cars, a Catering Car and the really difficult one the Generator Control Car.

Mk4007.jpg

201110-18Mark4Train2.jpg

201110-18Mark4Train3.jpg

201110-18Mark4Train4.jpg

201110-18Mark4Train5.jpg

201110-18Mark4Train.jpg

How successful I was I’ll leave to you to decide.

Edited by Kirley
wrong pic entered

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C Class from a Modern Traction Kit.

 

I picked up a C & an A Class Kit by MTK both in the same box with no instructions. After splitting the parts into what I

thought was the A & C kits I decide to try the C Class first.

ClassCkit001.jpg

I used a Hornby Class 25 chassis to provide the power.

ClassC002.jpg

Fibre Optics were used to provide the marker lights and a test run showed they worked!

CClasstestrun006.jpg

The green of the1960 CIE livery was provided by Revell 365 Satin

CClass-C229001.jpg

CClass-C229004.jpg

CClass-C229005.jpg

 

Comparing the MTK with the Silver Fox Model the obvious difference is the front profile which appear to me a more accurate

than the Silver Fox but the overall dimensions of the MTK are bigger than the Silver Fox which makes the model out of place

especially beside my other A & C Class models.

CClass-C229006.jpg

CClass-C229007.jpg

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WT Class -Jeep

I completed my conversion of a Hornby MT4 to a UTA WT Class known affectionally as Jeeps some time ago but problems with the Valve Gear Assembly meant two returns to Hornby. It was worth the wait as is running perfectly now.

Jeep001.jpg

It was good to be able to run it at last as well as the rake of UTA coaches I completed to complement it.

Jeep002.jpg

Jeep038.jpg

Jeep012.jpg

Jeep003.jpg

Jeep005.jpg

Jeep039.jpg

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GNR(I) Cattle Wagon Kits

 

CattleWagons001.jpg

Just completed assembling some of Leslie McAllister's Cattle Wagon Kits.

Found the make up to be straight forward after you got over the tedious bit of

cleaning all the parts especilly with all those slats on the sides.

CattleWagons002.jpg

One thing I found was the resin is brittle, not a lot of give.

I dropped one of the chassis and one of the axle box castings snapped off.

I super-glued it back on but was worried would it hold when I put the wheels on but no problems.

I was cleaning one of the body end castings and was working on an uneven surface and when I put

pressure on it one corner snapped off. Again super-glue to the rescue .

CattleWagons003.jpg

Very detailed instructions are supplied and I only deviated once from them as I wished to paint

the wagons first before putting the wheels on.

More Wagons on order.

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UTA MED Set

 

MED10.jpg

 

The UTA despite having very limited resources came up with many innovative railcars. The Multi-Engined Diesel (MED) was an early diesel powered three-coach diesel railcar set and was constructed at its Duncrue Street works, starting in 1951. Twenty eight Units in total were built and they lasted until 1978.

MED9.jpg

 

 

 

I decided to have a go at making a set and when I saw Worsley Works advertising a kit for it I thought it would be reasonably straight forward. But this was my first attempt at soldering a brass kit. It turned out to be not the easiest kit to start with and there were many attempts at soldering, unsoldering and re-soldering again.

MED001.jpg

 

I used Airfix 60’ coaches for two of the cars and replaced the sides with the brass ones. For the driving car I used a Replica Railways die-cast chassis. They only have the 64’ chassis available at the moment which meant having to reduce the size of the chassis.

 

MED006.jpg

 

I found Replica Railways were very helpful in guiding me through this operation sending me detailed instructions on how to do this.

MED008.jpg

 

 

The die-cast chassis very smooth runner and its only drawback is the works intrude into the passenger compartment and no seating could be fitted in the driving car.

 

MEDchassis002.jpg

MED8.jpg

MED3.jpg

MED6.jpg

MED6.jpg

MED5.jpg

MED.jpg

Reasonably pleased at my first attempt at soldering a brass kit but I would equate it with using an airbrush- the more you practice the better you get at it.

MED2.jpg

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MAK K801

 

 

 

For whatever reason the MAK Type 800 D loco has always held a fascination for me. Made in Germany it was delivered free of charge for trials to the GNRB and unloaded at North Wall, Dublin in the end of 1954.

 

Following the disbanding of the Great Northern Railway Board in 1958 it was allocated to CIÉ and renumbered K801. It spent most of its working life in Cork and then the Drogheda area before it was withdrawn in 1976

 

HOBBYTRAIN62650DIESELLOKV65ROTderDBE761.jpg

My donor model is based on the DB V65 which is only supplied in HO Scale and made by Hobbytrain.

K801005.jpg

 

 

It was fairly straight forward, involving stripping the original paint, adding some grills at the front, sides and rear. The cab doors had to be repositioned and hand rails added. Also horns and cab steps were required.

 

K801008.jpg

K801007.jpg

 

I have set my model in 1956 taken from a photograph carrying the following caption, “THIS WAS RELEASED FROM INCHICORE AFTER REPAIRS ON 30/06/1956. IT IS REPAINTED IN UNLINED GREEN & NUMBERED K801”

K801011.jpg

K801009.jpg

 

Hopefully the difference in scale is not to obvious.

K801012.jpg

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A Village in Ireland

 

As some light relief away from “engineering” I thought I would try some buildings for my layout. When I saw a book on ebay containing a card model of an Irish Village I thought I would give it a go.

IrishTown020.jpg

IrishTown019.jpg

IrishTown018.jpg

IrishTown017.jpg

IrishTown016.jpg

 

It was not a pre –cut out kit like Melcalfe and each piece had to be cut out which did away with the light relief aspect of this project.

IrishTown014.jpg

IrishTown015.jpg

IrishTown013.jpg

In truth it was death by a thousand cuts not to mention how many scalpel blades I went through.

IrishTown012.jpg

IrishTown011.jpg

IrishTown010.jpg

 

Well it’s finished now and I suppose for £6 it was not a bad purchase and should look better when built into the layout.

Edited by Kirley

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Guest hidden-agenda

Looking good Kieran and a pleasure to meet you in person at the Bangor show.

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Bogie Wagons –Container & Timber

[This entry was originally posted on the old site.]

With thanks to MV038, IE201 and others for their previous posting on the above type wagons. I decided I’ll have to have a go and based the models on what has been already been done by others with a few of my own additions.

Collecting Hornby 60’ wagons and cutting the ones down to 47’ for Container use was the first stage. I noted the difficulty in getting a good join between the sawn wagon parts and after a few goes I hit on this method which gave me a “true meet” between the 2 half’s.

Bogiewagons006.jpg

I placed the 2 parts to be joined on an old steel ruler, applied Epoxy Resin (Z-Poxy 5 –minutes).

Bogiewagons001.jpg

I used bulldog clips to hold the 2 parts together and other clips to hold the body to the steel ruler to keep it flat.

You should end up with a good strong join.

Bogiewagons007.jpg

Once the first one was completed, it was down to assembly line practice.

Bogiewagons008.jpg

 

Buffers were made from plasticard with a brass pipe shaft inside Evergreen Tube 3.2 mm (Code 224).

 

Bogiewagons011-1.jpg

Undercoat and then test run

BogieWagons002-1.jpg

 

I also included a couple of pocket wagons I had resprayed and identified the potental problem with Dapol and old Hornby couplings.

BogieWagons006-1.jpg

Timber Wagons are more of a challenge. Working from what others had done, along with copies of Wagons drawings (thanks to 3wheeler) and closely examining available photograph I came up with the following construction method.

Bogiewagons009.jpg

Plasticard with Evergreen Channel 3.2mm (Code 264) 0.4 x 2.0 strips (Code 114) were used.

Bogiewagons010.jpg

The ends were covered with the 3.2 mm channel.

BogieWagons0022.jpg

BogieWagons007-1.jpg

They were heated with a hair dryer to mould into the shape required.

 

I concluded from the drawings that 5 pallets with upright stanchions at each corner where fitted across the body of the 60’ wagons.

 

BogieWagons001-1.jpg

These were made from plasticard, channel, strips and Evergreen square tube 3.2 mm (Code 252) and then attached to the body. Small piping is placed into the square tubes to bring them up to the correct height. Brake wheels (brass etches from Hursts) were fitted to each side of the wagon.

 

Awaiting more parts before completing the build and moving onto the painting stage.

201012-08BogieWagons-ContainerTimber.jpg

 

 

Wagons painted in MIR red Oxide.

201012-08BogieWagons-ContainerTimber19.jpg

Wagons loaded

201012-08BogieWagons-ContainerTimber210.jpg

Paint and transfers completed. I loaded the containers with lead airgun pellets for weight.

Timber wagons painted.

201012-08BogieWagons-ContainerTimber311.jpg

Timber loads were built around foam squares to reduce the overweight and to stop these wagons being too heavy.

201012-08BogieWagons-ContainerTimber412.jpg

Wagons loaded.

201012-08BogieWagons-ContainerTimber414.jpg

Container Wagons in action.

201012-09Boggiewagons-completed15.jpg

Timber train passing.

Collages16.jpg

 

Close up of the pocket wagons.

Boggiewagons-completed01317.jpg

The Wagon Project took a lot longer than I had anticipated and I am happy to move on to my Hunslet rake project.

 

Those container flats look amazing

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Wagons, Buildings and Vehicles

Taking time out from building the layout to clear up some odds and ends that needed completing.

WagonsVehicles003.jpg

The last of the MIR Cement Kits.

WagonsVehicles006.jpg

Farm house buildings for the new layout.

WagonsVehicles007.jpg

Thanks to Enniscorthyman for the technical advice on the Post Van.

WagonsVehicles008.jpg

 

WagonsVehicles010.jpg

I wanted to do a UTA lorry and was told the livery was either UTA Green or in the later period Eau de Nil. I tried the Eau de Nil –(something near duck egg blue) but it did not look right so green it became.

 

 

Now it’s back to track laying and wiring points –no excuses .............unless I did some DCC conversions.

Edited by Kirley

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Love the farmhouse scenario, with the post office out front. Captures a certain something!

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Guest hidden-agenda

I love the job you done with the MAK Kieran its first class and a credit to you , the buildings look the job and the post office wit the van on a rainy day( pass me the bottle please), that Bedford truck looks great in green where did you pick her up?.

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Thanks Guys, Gareth it's a EFE Bedford, TK Arti Flatbed -British Rail with Container.

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My new layout is controlled by DCC so I am in the process of converting all my locomotives to DCC and I am using this opportunity to add light to some of the Locomotives which never had them.

 

My Dapol based Castle Class is one I used the lights kit provided by “Express Models” to do a wide range of lights for locomotives.

 

CastleClass-lights1.jpg

CastleClass-lights.jpg

CastleClass-lights2.jpg

 

The kit provided has front and rear lights with a cable to connect front to back thus requiring one decoder for the motor and lights combined.

 

CastleClass-lights3.jpg

CastleClass-lights4.jpg

 

It was very easy to fit and I am very pleased with the results. For me it brings the model to life.

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My upgrading of locos to DCC is continuing, 25 completed to date. I have installed lights in some models and the latest are the Class 70 & Class 80. I also replaced the lights in my 2700 Class with LEDs again using a kit from Express Models –very straight forward.

KirleyProjects.jpg

Open heart surgery on the Class 80

KirleyProjects6.jpg

KirleyProjects8.jpg

Test running the 80.

KirleyProjects9.jpg

KirleyProjects12.jpg

Class 70 which only had a headlight.

KirleyProjects11.jpg

The Class 2700 with LEDs

KirleyProjects4.jpg

Just as an aside –my rake of Mk II coaches showing “40 shades” of orange!!

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Guest hidden-agenda

A reclining chair, whiskey (large) in one hand and cigar in the other and watch history roll by. Great work K and i have promised my self some railcars after the new year especially a 70 it brings back memories of the IRRS trip to Antrim. Dont worry about the 40 shades of orange, in the world called modelling you can have as many as you want and pass us the bottle please.

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Stunning stock and layout Kieran,fair play to you.The Irish Village

looks great and great job on the an post transit.You have a fantastic

collection of rolling stock and locos-very nice.:tumbsup:

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Trees

A Forest in a box is what International Models advertised and trees are what I want on my layout –was this the answer?

If it’s an exact replication of Oak, Ash or Beech trees then big money you need to spend. However if it is a representation of trees then this is quite good. It’s a box containing cuttings of a plant called Seamoss and you cut it up into tree like shapes. Dip it glue and scatter foliage.

 

KirleyJunctionTrees.jpg

 

KirleyJunctionTrees2.jpg

 

KirleyJunctionTrees3.jpg

 

KirleyJunctionTrees4.jpg

 

The bits left over can be used as hedging or spot plants so very little is wasted and good value for under £14.

 

International Models web site can be seen here http://www.internationalmodels.net/acatalog/Seamoss.html

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Kirley I have just commented a moment ago on how good the trees look in your layout thread. Another bonus is they'll smell nice with the hairspray. Actually the cheeper the hairspray the better it works.

 

Rich,

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Dieselnut has asked to see the process of making a Mark 4 Train hence this posting.

I used Bachmann Virgin Voyager stock which involves removing all the Voyager bits and pieces off the roof and filling all the recesses, a considerable amount of work just to get a “flat” roof.

 

Mk4009.jpg

 

Extra windows have to be cut out and others blanked. A handy method I found was using a Calliper and it could score the new openings at the right height.

 

Mk4005.jpg

 

Mk4003.jpg

 

Doors are each end were cut out and moved to the end of the coach.

The windows on the Mk 4 are smaller than the Voyager so I used a strip of Evergreen plastic card to reduce the size of the openings. (Sorry no photographs)

 

Now for the fun part –The DVT

 

Mk4006.jpg

 

I cut off the roof bump and moved it back.

 

Mk4007-1.jpg

 

Lots of cutting, inserting the “front wings”, filling and sanding to get the right shape.

 

Mk4008.jpg

 

Mk4009-1.jpg

 

Mk4010.jpg

 

Mk4011.jpg

 

Mk4012.jpg

 

Mk4013.jpg

 

Mk4014.jpg

 

Mk4015.jpg

 

Mk4016.jpg

 

 

See in the two photos below where the Evergreen strip was used to reduce the size of the windows.

 

 

Mk4017.jpg

 

Mk4018.jpg

 

Mk4019.jpg

 

 

 

Finally paint and adding decals which can be got from Studio Scale Models.

 

Not an easy conversion and good luck if you decide to have a go remembering D & M Models might do one in the near future!!

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Dieselnut has asked to see the process of making a Mark 4 Train hence this posting.

I used Bachmann Virgin Voyager stock which involves removing all the Voyager bits and pieces off the roof and filling all the recesses, a considerable amount of work just to get a “flat” roof.

 

Mk4009.jpg

 

Extra windows have to be cut out and others blanked. A handy method I found was using a Calliper and it could score the new openings at the right height.

 

Mk4005.jpg

 

Mk4003.jpg

 

Doors are each end were cut out and moved to the end of the coach.

The windows on the Mk 4 are smaller than the Voyager so I used a strip of Evergreen plastic card to reduce the size of the openings. (Sorry no photographs)

 

Now for the fun part –The DVT

 

Mk4006.jpg

 

I cut off the roof bump and moved it back.

 

Mk4007-1.jpg

 

Lots of cutting, inserting the “front wings”, filling and sanding to get the right shape.

 

Mk4008.jpg

 

Mk4009-1.jpg

 

Mk4010.jpg

 

Mk4011.jpg

 

Mk4012.jpg

 

Mk4013.jpg

 

Mk4014.jpg

 

Mk4015.jpg

 

Mk4016.jpg

 

 

See in the two photos below where the Evergreen strip was used to reduce the size of the windows.

 

 

Mk4017.jpg

 

Mk4018.jpg

 

Mk4019.jpg

 

 

 

Finally paint and adding decals which can be got from Studio Scale Models.

 

Not an easy conversion and good luck if you decide to have a go remembering D & M Models might do one in the near future!!

Wow kieran,

Fantastic work ,If i can make one half as good ill be happy,eamon.

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