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GNRi1959

Omagh Goods Yard

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Progress on Omagh Goods Yard is starting to take shape with the basic contours formed and track laid, though not pinned yet. The different levels give it a feeling of depth and this is something I haven't tried before, the results are pleasing. Long way to go yet but I'm taking my time and really enjoying the progress so far.

 

omagh 1.jpg

omagh 2.jpg

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Just a thought, Tony. Some of the embankment sides look rather vertical. Don't know the area at all, but grassy slopes would rarely be more than 45degrees in the real world and even a 30 degree slope is actually 1 in 2 so steep!

 There again modelling allows us to go steeper without much detriment to how things look, though near vertical faces would either be rock faces or require retaining walls.

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I actually had less slope originally, though it was pretty steep in parts.....

W Class 2-6-0 at Omagh 1964.jpg

Edited by GNRi1959

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17 hours ago, David Holman said:

Just a thought, Tony. Some of the embankment sides look rather vertical. Don't know the area at all, but grassy slopes would rarely be more than 45degrees in the real world and even a 30 degree slope is actually 1 in 2 so steep!

 There again modelling allows us to go steeper without much detriment to how things look, though near vertical faces would either be rock faces or require retaining walls.

There is one part of the embankment that is very vertical and this is where a signal cabin was mounted. At this point there needed to be some sort of foundation, as in Omagh. I also recall there being steps placed in the embankments to allow easy access to the lower level where a pump house filled the water cranes for locos.

However, after a sleepless night (thanks David), I was in the shed this morning reducing my slopes and adding a few more layers of plaster bandage!

Edited by GNRi1959

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Sorry to disturb the slumbers Tony, but such things are easily fixed. Looking at the photo, the slope appears to be 45 degrees or so. I'm certainly no engineer, but have a feeling that anything steeper would be in danger of collapsing on itself, which is why retaining walls are used.

 There's some nice thick foliage on that embankment, so longer static fibres, topped with scenic matting and scatter will replicate nicely.

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The actual slump angle is a matter of many factors - the geology, the flora, the weather conditions, etc - this may be of some interest - https://www.newcivilengineer.com/latest/slope-engineering-uphill-rail-challenge-in-somerset/8661241.article - these days, they often 'net' slopes that worry people, even if they've been there for a long time already.

A glance at local examples would be a good guide, in general.

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Just back in from the shed, all embankments looking less like cliff-faces. David, as you say - easily remedied now. Glad I done it!

Broithe, thanks for an interesting article also.

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3 hours ago, Broithe said:

The actual slump angle is a matter of many factors - the geology, the flora, the weather conditions, etc - this may be of some interest - https://www.newcivilengineer.com/latest/slope-engineering-uphill-rail-challenge-in-somerset/8661241.article - these days, they often 'net' slopes that worry people, even if they've been there for a long time already.

A glance at local examples would be a good guide, in general.

A Civil Engineer once told me a 150 year old retaining wall would not "stand up" on paper.

To a large degree the slope angle depends on whether you are forming a cutting or an embankment.

Depending on ground conditions cuttings may have steeper slopes than embankments formed from fill material.

 

 

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Little, but some progress......

Road bridge over North Cabin end of Omagh, far from complete but getting there. Have put cork under track work - I bought it a year ago - I may as well use it.

Testing track at moment and just taking my time....

20190104_131758.jpg

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On 1/6/2019 at 11:16 PM, Paddy Mac Namara said:

like it, is that modelling clay?

Paddy, no Wills Scenic Sheet glued to 1.5mm birch ply. 

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Paddy, also Wills Scenic Sheet.

I took two pieces of 1.5mm birch ply and glued them together with woodworking glue. They were clamped together and placed in a former to curve them. 24hours later they were set so l took the wills sheeting and moulded them into a similar shape by bending them gentle over the edge of my bench. I stuck the sheeting to the ply using UHU glue and when dry cut it to shape with a scroll saw.

Edited by GNRi1959

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On 1/6/2019 at 11:16 PM, Paddy Mac Namara said:

like it, is that modelling clay?

I think Paddy means this bit here.

 

 

On 12/27/2018 at 7:43 PM, GNRi1959 said:

Progress on Omagh Goods Yard is starting to take shape with the basic contours formed and track laid, though not pinned yet. The different levels give it a feeling of depth and this is something I haven't tried before, the results are pleasing. Long way to go yet but I'm taking my time and really enjoying the progress so far.

omagh 2.jpg

 

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Paddy, if its the embankments you refer to, they were formed with plywood cut to shape as supports and paris plaster bandage draped over it. Although I used about five layers of plaster bandage I'm not really pleased with it as it is NOT rock hard like a plaster cast would be on a broken arm or leg. I think it may be because the shed was quite cold when I done it and it hasn't dried out quick enough!

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and finally, theres a good likelihood that a layout in the garden shed may come to an end very soon. I've had my belly full of hiding like a hermit in the shed with a hoodie and beanie on. This weekend I'm going to buy the wife a nice Indian and a bottle of her favourite red wine. Then I'm going to suggest that build a small end to end in my piano room, sitting on top of a series of 'Ikea Billy Bookcases'. It will be purely be a system to store all my railway books, vinyl, rolling stock and DVDs. On top, a simple end to end shunting layout measuring 2metres x 180mm. The shed will remain only as a workshop to build stock and scratch build.

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Wouldn't give up on Omagh just yet, Tony. The shed may not be perfect in the winter, but it makes a fine escape for the rest of the year, while the layout is coming on nicely.

 However, nothing wrong with an indoor layout either, so enjoy having both. Presumably, trains would be common to both? 

 For what it is worth,  if you do get permission for you indoor layout (make it a good bottle of red!), aim to keep it simple. Something you can get running and sceniced inside six months, leaving Omagh as your long term project, to be dipped into as the muse takes you.

 I've got two layouts at home, but fellow Chatham club members have been known to have four on the go at once, often in different scales and gauges. Now there's a thought!

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Thank you for your words of encouragement David, they were always great encouragement to me.

I'm taking a break from railway modelling and the number of times I drop in here.

Gardening projects to keep me occupied.

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The last quarter of the year is generally more miserable than the first quarter - things are 'going forward' now.

8 minutes ago, David Holman said:

make it a good bottle of red!

Or two reasonable bottles...

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... excellent! Now all you have to do is tidy the garden!

 Can't do gardening in the dark though, so still plenty of modelling time.

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You can get days when it is very difficult to raise enough "go" to begin modelling but I find with me it does not last long.

Setbacks happen but we have a great hobby and 99% of the time I find enough projects to keep me going. I do most of my buildings on the dining

table (very understanding wife !) . I have  a large garage but like your shed its extremely cold right now. Spring will soon be here!

 

 

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Plaster is usually white when fully dry.

On 1/11/2019 at 7:30 AM, GNRi1959 said:

Paddy, if its the embankments you refer to, they were formed with plywood cut to shape as supports and paris plaster bandage draped over it. Although I used about five layers of plaster bandage I'm not really pleased with it as it is NOT rock hard like a plaster cast would be on a broken arm or leg. I think it may be because the shed was quite cold when I done it and it hasn't dried out quick enough!

 

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I've come to the conclusion that railway modelling and l are not compatible any longer.
Yesterday, I lifted all my trackwork and this morning my son disposed of all baseboards to the local dump.
I cleared out the shed and I have had a good spring clean in it. It's in prime condition. I am now going to take a complete break before deciding what to do next.
I'm making no plans and certainly no promises!
 
Edited by GNRi1959
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Sadly, I have to agree with you. It’s a shame when all that effort goes to waste.

Stephen

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11 hours ago, GNRi1959 said:
I've come to the conclusion that railway modelling and l are not compatible any longer.
Yesterday, I lifted all my trackwork and this morning my son disposed of all baseboards to the local dump.
I cleared out the shed and I have had a good spring clean in it. It's in prime condition. I am now going to take a complete break before deciding what to do next.
I'm making no plans and certainly no promises!
 

Hi Tony, Really saddened to hear that. Please don't lose heart. You had been making great progress. This is your hobby, your layout, your own timescale, exclusively for your own enjoyment so don't even think or worry about 'promises' or plans expressed to others. You should not feel any pressure in anyway whatsoever to please folk on an internet forum, nor conform to perceived expectations, nor seek affirmation from other modellers. It's 100% your hobby so enjoy as you please and don't worry about 3rd parties looking on. Sometimes any of us can feel self imposed pressure to get things done, and that can just take away from the simple joy of participating in the hobby. It's not a performance, its the joy of enjoying modelling stuff that interests you at a pace you enjoy and find relaxing. Best wishes for the future. Noel

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Sorry to hear about your frustrations, sometimes life get in the way of modelling and we have to scale back our ambitions, my 20 ft lay out shrunk to 12 ft then 8 ft before I binned mine.

I now have an Ikea Lack shelf with a couple of pieces of track , even that can be too time consuming when you have kids, but a couple of half hour running sessions a month keep my interest up.

Sometimes it's best to just do your own thing and not worry too much about accuracy, it's your layout, model the area as you want without getting too frustrated about it being exactly prototypical.

Was watching your progress with interest as although was born too late for trains through Omagh, I used to walk along the old trackbed on my way to school every day.

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