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Warbonnet

A4 Mallard's new layout - Progress so far...

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86 Wagons?

 

About that I think, I lost count after about 60.

 

This is a rather impressive layout. I wouldn't mind swing a bit more video if you have the time to post..

 

If you check my youtube channel (link is below) there are a few other videos. I'm sure A4Mallard will post a couple new ones himself too when he finds the time too.

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I'm glad somebody was able to count them, I just gave up, fabulous,
I got between 86 and 90, but one fast blurry pan on the video had me stumped. :)

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I got between 86 and 90, but one fast blurry pan on the video had me stumped. :)

 

You could also try counting his record run (180 wagons, 3 class 20s)

 

[video=youtube;aLTqUEgn-aw]

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Without going off topic too much, what would have been the longest freight trains (loose coupled 2 axle wagons as per Warbonnets video) to run in the UK when these wagons were the norm? I'm thinking coal trains, or long distance mixed goods between London and the north? Would 86 to 90 wagons be realistic?

 

Mods: start new thread if necessary from this post (thanks!)

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Without going off topic too much, what would have been the longest freight trains (loose coupled 2 axle wagons as per Warbonnets video) to run in the UK when these wagons were the norm? I'm thinking coal trains, or long distance mixed goods between London and the north? Would 86 to 90 wagons be realistic?

 

Mods: start new thread if necessary from this post (thanks!)

 

Interesting, I was thinking the same when I counted 90 odd wagons. There must have been safety limits on the length of un-braked loose coupled trains. What sort of hauling load could a single loose coupling tolerate, and what brake van tonnage would be required in the event of a coupling failure. I presume the very long freight trains had multiple brake vans or more powerful brake vans. No problem with vacuum or air braked stock which presumably had stronger couplings.

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I understand that, on the Lickey Incline, and similar, they would stop at the top and hitch the wagon brakes half-on.

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Without going off topic too much, what would have been the longest freight trains (loose coupled 2 axle wagons as per Warbonnets video) to run in the UK when these wagons were the norm? I'm thinking coal trains, or long distance mixed goods between London and the north? Would 86 to 90 wagons be realistic?

 

Mods: start new thread if necessary from this post (thanks!)

 

 

 

 

 

Breaston-based railway historian Brian Amos, an expert on Toton, says: "Trains of some 80 to 90 wagons weighing 1,500 tons would be hauled a distance of 126 miles between Toton and Brent and would take almost eight hours, including two stops to replenish water supplies. Average speed of the journey was 16mph!

 

This line was the staple of the LMS Garratts, running coal from Nottinghamshire coal fields to London.

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Thanks Warbonnet! That must have been some sight in real life, and yours is just as mind blowing in miniature!

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Thanks Warbonnet! That must have been some sight in real life, and yours is just as mind blowing in miniature!

 

I would kill for a DeLorean and a flux capacitor to go back and see such sights! In the end the 8Fs and 9Fs could haul trains almost as long and more efficiently. The Garratts had their reliability problems but I'd still love to see one working hard.

 

I dont think the cement train behind 10001 is prototypical though. Great haulage capacity in those locos though, weigh a ton, more than any other diesel I've come across!

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That viaduct is spectacular! Is there access to the tunnels if there's a derailment?

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I would kill for a DeLorean and a flux capacitor to go back and see such sights! In the end the 8Fs and 9Fs could haul trains almost as long and more efficiently. The Garratts had their reliability problems but I'd still love to see one working hard.

 

I dont think the cement train behind 10001 is prototypical though. Great haulage capacity in those locos though, weigh a ton, more than any other diesel I've come across!

 

Just have to settle for a VW Polo then man.........

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