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Class 59 - A brief look at the different types

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As there was a few questions about the class 59s on the new Hornby 67 thread I thought I'd do a quick summary of the class as they are a firm favourite of mine. Essentially there are three different variations of the class 59; 59/0, 59/1 and 59/2.

 

59/0

 

These were the first 59s build by EMD in La Grange for Foster Yeoman. Four were built in 1984 with a fifth coming in 1988 as FY were unhappy with the poor reliability of BR locos such as the class 56 at the time. They were the first privately owned locos to run on BR metals. They featured centre mounted headlights under the cab windows and different marker lights from subsequent batches.

 

They were all delivered in Foster Yeoman livery, pictured here http://www.flickr.com/photos/donglos/4976383991/

 

One of the original class, 59 003 was exported to Germany, renumbered as 259 003, and operated by Yeoman/Deutsche Bahn (DB), pulling stone trains. Picture of it here - http://www.modern-locoillustrated.com/MLI%20issue%20downloads/Issue%20173/59003Eastleigh.jpg

 

It has since moved on to Heavy Haul Power International and is operating in this livery in Germany http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5097/5451528031_ce9dace62f.jpg

 

59/1

 

Foster Yeoman's main competitor ARC were impressed by the 59s and decided to buy some of their own. In 1990 four 59s were built, this time in EMD's London plant in Ontario, Canada. Designated 59/1, they featured revised lights each end, losing the centre beams the 59/0s had, and getting lights similar to the first 66s.

 

Picture of the original ARC livery here - http://mike-walker.smugmug.com/Trains/Mendip-GMs/i-pT227WT/0/M/R-BR-852ARC-59103-Old-Oak-M.jpg

 

59/2

 

Following Foster Yeoman, National Power decided to investigate the possibility of running its own trains, by ordering a single pilot locomotive. Following the trial, National Power ordered a further five locomotives and a fleet of hopper wagons to carry coal and limestone.

 

Again built at the London plant in 1994 and 1995, the six Class 59/2 locomotives differ from the Class 59/1s in several ways. A carbon dioxide fire control system replaces the original Halon system, NiCd batteries replace lead-acid, and the fleet all have drop-head knuckle couplers fitted. A more advanced slow speed control suitable for merry-go-round power station coal train operation has been fitted, as well as yaw dampers for a higher top speed.

 

These were the last of the 59s, orignal National Power livery - http://farm7.staticflickr.com/6031/6324851535_8d28f1a36f_z.jpg

 

In April 1998 EWS took over the National Power rail operations and re liveried the 59/2s into EWS http://www.semgonline.com/diesel/pics/cd59205_1.jpg and now they are all owned and painted in DB-S red http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/1/1a/59s-at-Acton.jpg

 

Mendip Rail

 

In the mid 90s both Yeoman and ARC pooled their resources and formed Mendip Rail. This became a train operating company to operate 59/0s and 59/1s on stone trains. The locos gained new liveries, such as Mendip Rail http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5449/7166192084_da18905c30_z.jpg Revised Yeoman http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3260/5761465652_43cfebd59c_z.jpg and revised ARC http://www.therailwaycentre.com/Main%20photo%20file/Cl59-1arc

 

ARC was then taken over by Hanson, and the 59/1s were repainted into their colours http://www.traintesting.com/images/59104%20Westbury%2019-10-06.jpg

Yeoman has also been taken over by Aggregate Industries, and the 59/0s are now being painted this livery http://www.therailwaycentre.com/NewSite%20POD%202008/POD30-07-08.jpg

 

All 59s work Stone trains in the South east, and can be regularly seen in London, mainly around Acton Mainline and the North London line.

 

Any questions/corrections/comments/additions accepted! Hope it's of help.

Edited by Warbonnet

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Thanks Fran for the Class 59 introductory :)

 

I knew one of the early 59s had been transferred abroad, but didn't know what had happened to it (Heavy Haul Power International eh?).

 

Btw, my first post! I live in North Wales and have been a bit of a GM (now EMD I s'pose!) power enthusiast for some time. Then I discovered Irish Railways through the GM link, and via another interest - the works of Mr Bulleid - Dear Oliver!

 

What a fabulous system and heritage the Irish rail system has (had?). I will admit though, my interest wanes somewhat beyond 2005-ish because of my love of loco hauled trains... and consequent uninterest in railcars.

 

-Rob

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Thanks Fran for the Class 59 introductory :)

 

I knew one of the early 59s had been transferred abroad, but didn't know what had happened to it (Heavy Haul Power International eh?).

 

Btw, my first post! I live in North Wales and have been a bit of a GM (now EMD I s'pose!) power enthusiast for some time. Then I discovered Irish Railways through the GM link, and via another interest - the works of Mr Bulleid - Dear Oliver!

 

What a fabulous system and heritage the Irish rail system has (had?). I will admit though, my interest wanes somewhat beyond 2005-ish because of my love of loco hauled trains... and consequent uninterest in railcars.

 

-Rob

 

Welcome Rob, it's nice to have you here.

 

Rich,

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As there was a few questions about the class 59s on the new Hornby 67 thread I thought I'd do a quick summary of the class as they are a firm favourite of mine. Essentially there are three different variations of the class 59; 59/0, 59/1 and 59/2.

 

59/0

 

These were the first 59s build by EMD in La Grange for Foster Yeoman. Four were built in 1984 with a fifth coming in 1988 as FY were unhappy with the poor reliability of BR locos such as the class 56 at the time. They were the first privately owned locos to run on BR metals. They featured centre mounted headlights under the cab windows and different marker lights from subsequent batches.

 

They were all delivered in Foster Yeoman livery, pictured here http://www.flickr.com/photos/donglos/4976383991/

 

One of the original class, 59 003 was exported to Germany, renumbered as 259 003, and operated by Yeoman/Deutsche Bahn (DB), pulling stone trains. Picture of it here - http://www.modern-locoillustrated.com/MLI%20issue%20downloads/Issue%20173/59003Eastleigh.jpg

 

It has since moved on to Heavy Haul Power International and is operating in this livery in Germany http://farm6.static.flickr.com/5097/5451528031_ce9dace62f.jpg

 

59/1

 

Foster Yeoman's main competitor ARC were impressed by the 59s and decided to buy some of their own. In 1990 four 59s were built, this time in EMD's London plant in Ontario, Canada. Designated 59/1, they featured revised lights each end, losing the centre beams the 59/0s had, and getting lights similar to the first 66s.

 

Picture of the original ARC livery here - http://mike-walker.smugmug.com/Trains/Mendip-GMs/i-pT227WT/0/M/R-BR-852ARC-59103-Old-Oak-M.jpg

 

59/2

 

Following Foster Yeoman, National Power decided to investigate the possibility of running its own trains, by ordering a single pilot locomotive. Following the trial, National Power ordered a further five locomotives and a fleet of hopper wagons to carry coal and limestone.

 

Again built at the London plant in 1994 and 1995, the six Class 59/2 locomotives differ from the Class 59/1s in several ways. A carbon dioxide fire control system replaces the original Halon system, NiCd batteries replace lead-acid, and the fleet all have drop-head knuckle couplers fitted. A more advanced slow speed control suitable for merry-go-round power station coal train operation has been fitted, as well as yaw dampers for a higher top speed.

 

These were the last of the 59s, orignal National Power livery - http://farm7.staticflickr.com/6031/6324851535_8d28f1a36f_z.jpg

 

In April 1998 EWS took over the National Power rail operations and re liveried the 59/2s into EWS http://www.semgonline.com/diesel/pics/cd59205_1.jpg and now they are all owned and painted in DB-S red http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/1/1a/59s-at-Acton.jpg

 

Mendip Rail

 

In the mid 90s both Yeoman and ARC pooled their resources and formed Mendip Rail. This became a train operating company to operate 59/0s and 59/1s on stone trains. The locos gained new liveries, such as Mendip Rail http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5449/7166192084_da18905c30_z.jpg Revised Yeoman http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3260/5761465652_43cfebd59c_z.jpg and revised ARC http://www.therailwaycentre.com/Main%20photo%20file/Cl59-1arc

 

ARC was then taken over by Hanson, and the 59/1s were repainted into their colours http://www.traintesting.com/images/59104%20Westbury%2019-10-06.jpg

Yeoman has also been taken over by Aggregate Industries, and the 59/0s are now being painted this livery http://www.therailwaycentre.com/NewSite%20POD%202008/POD30-07-08.jpg

 

All 59s work Stone trains in the South east, and can be regularly seen in London, mainly around Acton Mainline and the North London line.

 

Any questions/corrections/comments/additions accepted! Hope it's of help.

 

Thats a great piece of work Fran and very informative. I love the class 59's myself, very close to our own 201's.

 

Rich,

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Thanks Rich - it's good to be here! :D

 

Welcome on board Robert now get busy with your camera Fran and myself want loads of pics of 66's/59's and another favourite of mine 47's and 57's its good to see more lads from the main land joining our Irish website.

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Gerald Beesley, formerly with CIÉ and then a railway business and engineering consultant before becoming the current Irish Railway Safety Commissioner, was instrumental in both ARC and National Power acquiring GM EMD locomotives during the 1990s.

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Welcome on board Robert now get busy with your camera Fran and myself want loads of pics of 66's/59's and another favourite of mine 47's and 57's its good to see more lads from the main land joining our Irish website.

 

Not sure I have the time or the patience to take pics of 19 class 47s Anthony (And they're the ones I know I have off the top of my head!) Weird thing is I always preferred 50s but only have 4 of them.

 

And don't even get me started on 37s! :)

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Gerald Beesley, formerly with CIÉ and then a railway business and engineering consultant before becoming the current Irish Railway Safety Commissioner, was instrumental in both ARC and National Power acquiring GM EMD locomotives during the 1990s.

 

Interesting, I didn't know that. I suppose if you wanted someone with experience in GM traction you come to the guys who had 30 years of knowledge!

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I forgot about the 37's I see Hattons are selling the Vitrains 37 at £50

 

If you flush glaze them they look decent. Both the Vitrains and the Bachmann version have their strengths and weaknesses. I picked up one for a repaint from Hattons for £36!

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Welcome on board Robert now get busy with your camera Fran and myself want loads of pics of 66's/59's and another favourite of mine 47's and 57's.....

 

So no pressure then? :ROFL:

 

-Rob

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If you flush glaze them they look decent. Both the Vitrains and the Bachmann version have their strengths and weaknesses. I picked up one for a repaint from Hattons for £36!

 

ViTrains 37s don't really need flushglazing, they really NEED their standard glazing fitting properly! The entire cab glazing, front windows and cab sides are cast as one unit, that doesn't fit very well - if you remove the side windows, and then cut out the three front windows and take care to fit them properly, the result is really rather good. If memory serves, the internal body moulding around where the horns intrude into the cab stops the glazing unit fitting properly.

 

Best not to get me started on how badly formed the holes on the body of ViTrains 37s are to receive their respective detailing pieces. That said, they *look* like 37s when they'e finished, and if you ditch the traction tyres, they run extremely well too, and are *much* easier to do a quality sound fit to than the Bachmann model.

 

On balance, regarding the effort needed to get the 37 looking good on the rails, and good though they are, I'd have trouble recommending anyone spending any more than 40 quid on one.

 

I do rather like 37s... A mate of mine that has a good part of my fleet on loan on his layout stopped counting at twenty.... ;)

 

-Rob

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ViTrains 37s don't really need flushglazing, they really NEED their standard glazing fitting properly! The entire cab glazing, front windows and cab sides are cast as one unit, that doesn't fit very well - if you remove the side windows, and then cut out the three front windows and take care to fit them properly, the result is really rather good. If memory serves, the internal body moulding around where the horns intrude into the cab stops the glazing unit fitting properly.

 

Best not to get me started on how badly formed the holes on the body of ViTrains 37s are to receive their respective detailing pieces. That said, they *look* like 37s when they'e finished, and if you ditch the traction tyres, they run extremely well too, and are *much* easier to do a quality sound fit to than the Bachmann model.

 

On balance, regarding the effort needed to get the 37 looking good on the rails, and good though they are, I'd have trouble recommending anyone spending any more than 40 quid on one.

 

I do rather like 37s... A mate of mine that has a good part of my fleet on loan on his layout stopped counting at twenty.... ;)

 

-Rob

 

Interesting Robert, I must try that on mine. I saw one with Lazerglaze and it looked great.

 

I agree about the mounting holes for the detail bits, the 47s are the same. But I think they can look good. The Bachmann's bogie sideframes are a letdown for me, they need to be raised and maybe narrowed. The front cab windows are a bit small too.

 

My 37 doesn't have traction tires, I think they did away with them on later models, it runs lovely and is a good strong puller.

 

Pictures Robert, pictures!!!!

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Interesting Robert, I must try that on mine. I saw one with Lazerglaze and it looked great.

 

I agree about the mounting holes for the detail bits, the 47s are the same. But I think they can look good. The Bachmann's bogie sideframes are a letdown for me, they need to be raised and maybe narrowed. The front cab windows are a bit small too.

 

My 37 doesn't have traction tires, I think they did away with them on later models, it runs lovely and is a good strong puller.

 

Pictures Robert, pictures!!!!

 

Lazerglaze makes a huge difference to a model as it removes the prismatic effect of the plastic glazing favored by the manufacturers. I am having some done for my 201's as the non flush glazing on the windscreens just looks poor and plastic looking on the models. I'll be sending over a body for measuring and manufacture of the glazing soon. This was all meant to be undertaken during July but due to other circumstances I had to delay it.

 

Rich,

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Lazerglaze makes a huge difference to a model as it removes the prismatic effect of the plastic glazing favored by the manufacturers. I am having some done for my 201's as the non flush glazing on the windscreens just looks poor and plastic looking on the models. I'll be sending over a body for measuring and manufacture of the glazing soon. This was all meant to be undertaken during July but due to other circumstances I had to delay it.

 

Rich,

 

That I cannot deny Rich, Lazerglaze is an excellent product, and I will definitely agree that the windscreens on the MM 201 certainly lets it down - I must have a word with Brian(?) when he's got the measurements sorted - assuming the 201 glazing is for general release?

 

Regards,

 

-Rob

 

ps Going back to 37 glazing for a mo', you can reduce some of the prismatic effects (the 'white' inside edge of the unit) by setting the glazing units in place with something like Johnson's Klear.

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I notice a lot of the shops seem to be running down their stocks of Vitrains

 

They haven't released much in the last while which I found worrying. However, I read that they are concentrating introducing a big raft of European models (their bread and butter) and are doing the Rail Exclusive Class 47s. I'm sure they'll bring out more locos soon.

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That I cannot deny Rich, Lazerglaze is an excellent product, and I will definitely agree that the windscreens on the MM 201 certainly lets it down - I must have a word with Brian(?) when he's got the measurements sorted - assuming the 201 glazing is for general release?

 

Regards,

 

-Rob

 

ps Going back to 37 glazing for a mo', you can reduce some of the prismatic effects (the 'white' inside edge of the unit) by setting the glazing units in place with something like Johnson's Klear.

 

Brian does all the work himself Rob in house. Things might require a little more time at this time of the year considering that we are in the height of the exhibition season. I think the laser glaze is as important an after sale detailing part as anything else we have had in the past from the cottage industry. People are using it in locos that are already factory flush glazed as it just looks more realistic and no matter how thick it looks to fit the window - windscreens on a model it looks ultra thin when fitted. I've seen it on Hornby or Lima MK111's with the correct extreme etchings window frames, and it brings the models to a new level of realism. I may use the Southern Pride Models MK111 bogie side frames on the MK111 trains as I will be using a modified version of the Jim Smith Wright (as sold by Brassmaster) bogie for 21mm wheelsets.

 

Johnsons's Klear seems to have some great uses for the modeller and can be used when gluing clear plastic or acetate when the material is coated with the clear because if any fogging of the material occurs more Klear can be used to remove it. Klear seems an ideal product for using to hold the fitted glazing or name plates in place as it adheres to the model by capillary action and seems more efficient than varnish.

 

As I've said I will be sending a 201 body to Brian soon for measuring and manufacture of the glazing. I had intended to have it produced for my own fleet but I don't see how it would be any problem for someone wishing to flush glaze their model to contact Brian themselves as all the spade work will have been done. I will leave the angular cabside windows as they are on the model and concentrate on the four windscreens and the other 4 cabside sliding windows nearest the doors. Although the four sliding windows aren't flush to the cabsides on the prototype they are considerably closer to the bodyside then they are represented on the model.I will have a go at creating the rubber seals on the 4 cabside sliding windows with microstrip if I can. If not I'll use some ultra thin paint lines to represent them. Hopefully and if time permits the waiting time won't be too long to have them produced.

 

Rich,

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That would be great Rich if the Lazerglaze for the 201's was made available to everyone I'd have a go at doing a few of my own

 

Brian was very obliging and willing to carry out the work for me Anto during our conversation. As soon as production packs for the loco are produced I couldn't see why Brian would not make them available as a part of the Lazerglaze range for the 201 model. I will take this up with Brian on our next conversation and let people know here. More often than not these can be applied as a friction fit without adhesive to the model. I'm a bit inclined to maybe use some Johnson's Klear around the corners of the window apertures and let capiliary action help the glazing set. I't maybe not totally neccesary but I'd feel safer. It will certainly move the model a few steps up the ladder in detailing looks and that sounds good to me.

 

Rich,

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When GM were working on the class 59, one of the early external design drawings presented to Foster Yeoman featured a loco that looks very similar to the IR 201 GM class loco. This was rejected by Foster Yeoman. Looks like the design was kept on file and presented IR when they went shopping to GM for the 201 class.

Will post a photo if anyone wants to see it.

From the book Foster Yeoman, The Rail Story. 75 years of aggregate by rail.By Colin J. Marsden.

Edited by spudfan
misspelling

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When GM were working on the class 59, one of the early external design drawings presented to Foster Yeoman featured a loco that looks very similar to the IR 201 GM class loco. This was rejected by Foster Yeoman. Looks like the design was kept on file and presented IR when they went shopping to GM for the 201 class.

Will post a photo if anyone wants to see it.

From the book Foster Yeoman, The Rail Story. 75 years of aggregate by rail.By Colin J. Marsden.

 

post away spudfan - would love to see it!

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When GM were working on the class 59, one of the early external design drawings presented to Foster Yeoman featured a loco that looks very similar to the IR 201 GM class loco. This was rejected by Foster Yeoman. Looks like the design was kept on file and presented IR when they went shopping to GM for the 201 class.

Will post a photo if anyone wants to see it.

From the book Foster Yeoman, The Rail Story. 75 years of aggregate by rail.By Colin J. Marsden.

 

Will always be a few projected designs, one of the BR class 60 design studies featured a French style Arzens raked back windscreen. The 59 design also has ribs in the bodysides to match wagons which Yeoman had when the locos were introduced but which didnt last long. The ribs stayed with the 59/1's and /2's and also gained by the 66 in all its variants....

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That would have been the PHA's from Procor.37 were ordered in 1984 but all were withdrawn in 1988/1989 and broken up.Suffered from structural cracks.

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Fitted at the construction stage by GM. 59001 also had a bell.

Edited by spudfan
error

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