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  1. Today
  2. Noel

    Class 121

    These look the best yet from Murphy Models. Love the iconic see through side grills like the prototype. MM have raised the bar yet again. Really looking forward to these. Like the user friendly pop off top plate for fitting DCC chips. Difficult to be sure but those axle covers look like they may even rotate! 👍Will be off to Marks models as soon as these hit the shelves to acquire some of these.
  3. StevieB

    Class 121

    Can’t wait to get my hands on one, or four. Stephen
  4. RedRich

    Class 121

    Very promising they really capture the look of these wonderful and unique locos. It's fantastic to know that soon we will have all 4 Illinois GM's modelled to such a high standard. Mr Murphy has pulled off another top model and deserves all the respect and plaudits he is due. Rich,
  5. popeye

    Class 121

    Very nice, they will look great when painted.
  6. A few pics of the first pre production 121’s on their way to Ireland for testing enjoy
  7. Evening folks, Updates to the gallery have been few and far between lately but the latest batch of images have just been uploaded to the August gallery. Featuring Tuesday 13th August 2019: Other life events have recently dragged me away from the railways and photography, but here is one from today at Ballybrophy of the 1625 Heuston - Limerick arriving into the station. Monday 19th August 2019: Photos today come from Portlaoise and Limerick. Tuesday 20th August 2019: A nice surprise this morning was catching 073 shunting the relay train at the perway yard in Portlaoise. Also Badger 231 was out on Cork services being photographed at Portlaoise on the 1425 Cork - Heuston service. Wednesday 21st August 2019 A flying visit to the Cabra area of Dublin today. Images come from Heuston, Phibsborough, Cabra and Ballybrophy. Thursday 22nd August 2019: The highlight from today was 2803 + 2804 in ex works condition heading from Inchicore to Limerick after a visit to the works in Inchicore. Click https://bit.ly/2Hkscdu to view all the images.
  8. This has to be one of the most pointless threads I have seen on here. It would make total sense if a manufacturer set up the survey. Any chance Fran, Pat, Richie, Stephen can enlighten us as to when IRM will be producing a Deltic. Didn't think they ran in Ireland Rich,
  9. Mayner

    Class 121

    What do other countries do? There are no global guidelines for collecting GST or similar taxes on low-value imported goods. However New Zealand’s new rules are similar to the rules introduced by Australia in July 2018. The European Union (EU) has committed to collecting Value Added Tax (VAT) on imported goods from sellers outside the EU from 1 January 2021. Internationally the customs value is based on the gross cost including shipping for both commercial and private imports. Interestingly from December it will be cheaper for me to import goods between $400-$1000 than at present as "customs recovery charges" will be removed from goods below $1000
  10. StevieB

    Class 121

    As one of a famous duo would say to the other, that’s another fine mess you’ve gotten me into. Our politicians do like to make life difficult for us, the ones who voted them in. Stephen
  11. An Post also charge a 'handling fee' if your item gets stopped for duty by Customs: "A fee of 1% of the value, with a minimum charge of €10 per packet or parcel, is charged by An Post for customs clearance of parcels imported from countries outside the EU. This fee is in addition to any duty or VAT payable." The thing that really annoys me is that Customs will base the duty they charge you on the price of the item plus postage costs, which I don't think is fair. "If your goods have: a customs value (including cost, transport, insurance and handling charges) of €22 or less you will not have to pay Customs Duty or VAT a customs value of more than €22 you will have to pay VAT an intrinsic value (the value of the goods alone excluding transport, insurance and handling charges) of more than €150 you will have to pay Customs Duty."
  12. Broithe

    Class 121

    In the UK, the threshold for tax being due on items from outside the EU is currently £15. Upwards from there, you are liable to 20% VAT, which is sort of OK. However, Royal Mail will also charge you a fee for handling the payment on your behalf, this is a flat rate fee of £8. Thus, an item worth £14.99 will arrive 'free' after you pay the vendor a total of £14.99 for it. An item judged to be worth £15 on arrival will cost you a total of £26 ( 26 = 15 + 3 + 8 ) - and be subject to a sometimes considerable delay. Buying an item close to the threshold has an element of risk - the 'value on arrival' is not within your control, it is down to an assessment made on 'your behalf' at the time of arrival - you may even have a receipt for an actual payment below £15, but a further slide of the pound during transit can tip you over into being liable to the Royal Mail ransom + VAT. Paying for something with 'free postage' can add to your woes, if the vendor then declares the total to be the value of the item - much better to have the item value and postage as separate amounts. The threshold issue may not be such a problem in the model railway world, but it does cause some trepidation around CDs, DVDs, etc.
  13. Mayner

    Class 121

    Internationally Governments are waking up to the loss of revenue from overseas on-line sales. Received an interesting notice today that NZ goods and sales tax will be charged on the total value of Youshop purchases. Its likely that the Irish Revenue will require An Post to develop a similar approach with packages from outside the EU. Logistics and Courier companies already act as agent for the Revenue and collect sales and purchase tax on imports. Hi John, As a YouShop customer, we want to keep you up to date about some upcoming policy changes from the New Zealand Government that will affect your YouShop experience. What’s changing? From 1 December 2019, all items purchased from overseas and shipped to your YouShop address will have 15% Goods & Services Tax (GST) applied. GST will be charged on the total value of the goods and YouShop services purchased. What does this mean to me if I’m using YouShop? If you’re buying from overseas retailers and shipping to your YouShop address, the retailer will not charge GST at the point of purchase (as they will not be aware that the items’ final destination is NZ). Instead, NZ Post will collect the GST on all purchases (irrespective of value) on behalf of the New Zealand Government, when you pay for your shipping to NZ through YouShop. If the value of your consignment* is over $1,000 then Customs may also collect duty (and GST on the amount of that duty) at the border. *A consignment is one or more parcels that have arrived together in New Zealand addressed to the same address/person. Why are these GST changes being made? With the growth of eCommerce, NZ businesses are at a competitive disadvantage compared to offshore suppliers, as they are required to collect GST on all sales, while overseas retailers don’t. These changes will help level the playing field for local businesses. Want more information? The New Zealand Government has released a comprehensive Q&A that explains these changes and the rationale behind them in greater detail. You can read this here. YouShop allows you to shop from any retailer in the U.S. and Europe and have it sent to your unique U.S. and U.K. address. So, even if the retailer doesn’t ship to New Zealand, YouShop will have you covered. It may even be cheaper to have your item shipped through YouShop over the retailer’s international shipping rates, so it’s always a good idea to check. Get Shopping Make sure you’re signed up to our emails to ensure you don’t miss out on hearing the latest news. Update your preferences here. Thanks, The YouShop Team
  14. I see little mention of steam era traction, particularly a saddle tank cobbled together Maunsell piece of goodness...well used to pilot duties. There's a silent majority who like a Sambo, just saying. My colleagues have yet to be convinced, so thumbs up folks for " Make Sambo Great Again" - We can do this!!!
  15. Yesterday
  16. Below just for fun is a very quick simple 'wishlist survey' for 00 gauge RTR Irish models. Forgive as I'm sure I've probably ommitted some obvious prototypes. Existing RTR stock have not been included for obvious reasons. There's only few questions which you can rank in order of your preferences and to speed up answers you can drag or slide answers vertically. It should only take a few mins to complete. Poll will remain open until Sunday night. Survey results will be published on FaceBook and here. Have fun. Thanks. Noel https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/DQZHN3M?fbclid=IwAR2dIMbyrhy00IBajKwJjsKyw91fL3vNWTes2hVl2wZuC30iRWIR7W83dMs
  17. A locoshed for Belmullet Can't believe it is 4 months since I did a workshop post, but everything has been layout orientated of late, so it is time to do something more specific. Anyone who has built a loco shed will tell you they can be awkward things, that are not a little fragile until the roof goes on. This is mainly because the opening for the loco results in weak spots on the two front corners while because they are perforce, single storey affairs, there is nowhere to put any internal bracing either. Experience has taught me that it is useful to build a loco shed on its own subframe, which can then be screwed to the actual baseboard once everything bar ground cover has been completed. I've based the shed for Belmullet on the one at Ballaghadereen, though I've made the workshop section only half the length. This is because I want a second siding coming off the turntable, so I can park a wagon of loco coal [and another for ash], alongside the line leading to the shed itself. This then made for another weak corner, which you might see has been braced with a short piece of aluminium angle. The core of the building is 5mm foam board, which is covered with Wills 'random stone' sheet on the inside and rendered stone sheet from the same source on the inside. The windows are from the York Modelmaking range and very nice they are too - saving a lot of work in the process, plus they only work out at around £1.50 each. Compared to covering the shell in Das clay and scribing the stonework, the Wills sheet is pretty quick too, while it also offers a lot more relief than scribing yourself. The downside is that a lot of filling is required to make the sheets match up, especially at the corners, with subsequent extra scribing too. The base is a piece of 3mm plywood [from Hobbycraft], which nicely matches the height of the cork floor tiles I use as track underlay. I cut a slot out for an inspection pit [which will be deepened by a similar slot in the baseboard itself], then made a length of track from copper clad sleepers and code 100FB rail, as per the rest of the layout. At this point, a couple of errors became apparent. First, the front opening was too narrow for any loco to pass through, and second, the shed itself was too short for any of my tender locos! A bit of robust filing eventually sorted the opening, but the shed length required more thought. At first I considered just lengthing it by adding a new section, but that would have messed up the symmetry of the windows. Instead, I've put an extension on the rear wall of the shed, using Wills corrugated asbestos sheet, as sold for 4mm scale. Indeed, all the Wills sheets are 4mm scale, but they seem ok in 7mm & the asbestos version has bolt heads moulded on as well. Anyway, the story is that, like the Achill Island branch, Belmullet was originally worked with MGW E class 0-6-0Ts, but soon after tender engines arrived, one was driven rather too enthusiastically into the real wall. Realising the need for more space at this point, the engine sized hole was enlarged slightly and a timber framed, wiggly tin extension built. A bit of fun was had with the interior, putting in a little basic detail in the form of a decent sized stove [large enough to do a bit of smithing], a workbench either side [one with a large vice on it], plus a storage cupboard for the loco crews. The flooring has been built up to be level with the tops of the sleepers, using card and more embossed sheet - brick setts this time - filled in with Das clay. On the outside, you can see my method of doing guttering. 2.5mm square plastic strip is used for the gutters themselves & this is projected out from the tops of the walls by additional pieces of the same section. The roof slates, when added, will overlap the gaps you can see at the moment. So there we are so far. I'm hoping that, by the time the shed is finished, a Kitwood Models 10.5" laser cut turntable kit will be available again, as that circular hole in the baseboard really needs filling!
  18. NIR

    Generic Signalling

    I've also been thinking about shunting on a single line, shunting being another of the few signalled flows wholly visible on a layout. Generally speaking, shunting can take place freely within the 'station limits' between the home (the first signal) and the starter (the last signal) in each direction of a single signal cabin. The position of these signals rarely coincide in each direction, which is not a problem on double lines but on single lines creates two different 'station limits' on the one line. H>>>>>>>>>>S S<<<<<<<<<<H The simple but hard to find answer is that, on a single line, shunting can take place freely between the home signals in each direction of a single signal cabin (from H to H above). Which makes sense, this is the furthest extent a signalman can be sure of denying entry - his starters, even if lying beyond the homes in the opposite direction, are irrelevant to oncoming trains as they are facing the other way. There are no 'shunt limits' on a single line, that concept only applies when shunting wrongway on a double line. On a single line a shunting movement can go as far as is necessary, even beyond the home signal if the next signalman is made aware of when the movement begins and ends or if the movement follows in the wake of a train departing in that direction. So it's something you don't need to give a lot of thought to. You can shunt a single line however you like so long as you keep oncoming movements from either direction well away by setting the signalling to stop until the shunt is finished. And this is the one time you can properly chase a departing train!
  19. NIR

    Generic Signalling

    I've been thinking of generic signalling of loops on a single line, crossing being one of the few signalled flows wholly visible on a layout. 1. Bidirectional passing loop - splitting stop signal with arms of equal height before each entry, stop signal before exit at both ends (6 signals with 8 arms!) 2. Up/down passing loop - stop signal before each entry reading only to one side, stop signal before exit at opposite ends (4 signals with 4 arms, trap points before each exit at opposite ends allow running straight into the loop but this may be deprecated for passenger working) 3. Non-passenger passing loop - splitting stop signal before each entry with lower arm reading to dedicated goods-only line (or stop signal plus ground signal reading to dedicated goods-only line), trap points at both ends of dedicated goods-only line, stop signal (or ground signal) before exiting dedicated goods-only line at both ends (4 signals with 6 arms or 2 signals with 2 arms) 4. Non-passenger passing loop (ground frame only) - as 3 above but no stop signals just ground signals, non-passenger trains 'shut in' on dedicated goods-only line by token All signals are placed at the toe of the entry point or before the fouling point at the exit (or at toe of trap point if fitted). For 1 and 2 non-crossing trains run straight through but crossing trains are both brought to a halt at the signal controlling entry to the loop before each pulling forward into the loop (except see 2 above). For 3 and 4 the non-passenger train is slowed/stopped at the entry signal then runs onto the goods-only line, the crossing train then runs straight through.
  20. Looking at the prices of the showmans you would be better off getting an Oxford one ready to go. Less fun though as they look like nice models. https://www.oxforddiecast.co.uk/products/fowler-b6-showmans-locomotive-the-lion-anderton-and-rowland-76fb6001?_pos=13&_sid=2fa6c842e&_ss=r I have a few of the oxford tration engines, a bit of matt coat, sprinkle of coal and pick out some of the motion in silver brings them up to nice little models.
  21. WaYSidE

    Class 121

    my bags are packed with your trains In ireland, i am charged taxes on some importid items from USA, ,, charged by postperson at my door. wont a hard brexit mean Tarrifs on luxury items,? to UK, as there is to USA, NZ etc. but not to EU. as for vat in EU, intra EU Vat is only Zero rated to businesses who can reclaim on Vies and Vat return, if you are not vat registered, you pay Vat in EU. as do all private customers. there used to be vat re-claim but i think thats all gone, non EU, tourists can reclaim vat, on purchases made here, so bring large suitcase and ship home with air luggage for cheapest rates. I am willing to personally deliver them To you in USA, if you pay my fair, time and 3 weeks r n r in Washington state. i will even make irish accent station recordings for you at that price...
  22. Last week
  23. Apart from the Broadmeadows Viaduct on the Dublin-Belfast line collapsing into the sea in 2009 Melverely Bridge on the Welsh Borders was probably the best example of a shonky railway bridge in the British isles. Both the original timber bridge and its steel replacement became unsafe to support a train. During the 1940s a loco would push a train of wagons across from one side for another loco to pick up. There are similar stories of lines in the states (Chicago Attica & Southern) and locally (Taupo Totora Timber Company) where the bridges were in that bad of condition that the train crew would set the train in motion very slowly before getting off and walking across after the train made safety made it to the other side.
  24. why why not, ? indeed i'll have one of each please.
  25. Just reminded me a bit of that fillum, the Cassandra crossing, where, if I remember rightly they are hurtling towards a big rickety old wooden bridge ! I'm sure it's way more secure than it looks, specially If you've got earthquakes to contend with too..! Great pictures..👍 It got me intrigued and looked up the movie out of interest, funny how you remember stuff wrong.. The bridge they used was apparently an impressive iron viaduct in France made by none other than Monsieur Eiffel ( of tower fame) and they did some major railway modelling to film the crash and disintegrating bridge scenes...
  26. As evening time descends on the locomotive stabling point at Tara junction-the floodlights come on to light up the area, as are the red lights on the rear of the locomotives, I wonder will the locomotive fleet controller allow 088 work the oil tank transfer ? 156+183 work a pallet cement train past the locomotive stabling point.
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