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Showing content with the highest reputation on 23/03/18 in all areas

  1. As one of the silly, overpaid consultant "engineers" who worked on the construction phase of the LUAS Cross City, I always find it funny reading comments from armchair planners and engineers criticising the designs. Do you honestly think that every route option for the LUAS Cross City wasn't examined in detail. The project began planning not long after the red line was finished, and the final route was decided upon following public consultation and agreement between all stakeholders; including DCC, NTA, RPA (now TII) Grangegorman Development Authority etc. These projects are designed with long term thinking in mind (the new metro and other proposed lines for example) not the short term that many seem to criticise. The chosen route serves the largest agglomeration and provides the most conveniently located stops. It is no coincidence that many large cities around the world - such as Edinburgh and Sydney - are returning to light rail as an option for public transport. As Mayner mentioned above, the grass is not always greener. Having lived in Auckland for a year it makes Dublins public transport look like a well oiled machine! As for the underground options, Dublin is sitting on a bed of limestone covered by boulder clay and other glacial till deposits. These make it a nightmare to tunnel through as there are many fissures and water pockets which are difficult to pick up during site investigation works. Other tunnelling projects in Dublin, such as the Port Tunnel and the Greater Dublin Drainage Scheme were far from smooth sailing and encountered many difficulties, but none that couldn't be resolved by the "clueless" designers involved. For the LUAS to work as intended, it requires the cooperation of other road users which, unfortunately is not always the case - how many incidents involving trams are the fault of the trams/drivers? Look at how well the trams work in cities like Amsterdam as they have priority and car usage is reduced. Hopefully the proposed metro will resolve some of the issues with Dublins public transport but it is an old city with old, and hidden problems so it may take some time.
    10 points
  2. Our Taras, which art in Navan, Hallowed be thy train. Thy loco comes, thy will be hauled, South to the port of Dublin. Give us this day our daily ore, And forgive the odd rough shunt, Through North Wall yard, And along Alexandra Road. And be led not unto the scrapline, But deliver that zinc again.
    5 points
  3. Five Hail Red Oxides and Two Our Taras, and a Glory Be to 21mm?
    3 points
  4. Heres what it looks like now, track is sitting loose on glued cork. I will start laying the track tomorrow. I have to drill holes to fit point motors underneath and bore for the droppers. Out of shot, to the bottom will be the turntable and line to fiddle yard.
    2 points
  5. I have been downloading pictures from the internet for years and i'm sure the rest of you do the same. It's nice to have a collection of railway pictures of all the things you like and for modelling purposes. I don't use them for any other purpose. Some sites won't let you download so i don't even bother to look at them because if you see a picture you like you can't save it.
    1 point
  6. Come on JB - pay attention - the meeting was last week - you'd need a Time Machine - not Captain Kirk's teleport! However, I have the job of reporting the meeting and this is what I posted on the London Area website - 15 March 2017 Michael Davies, who had just returned from his 132nd visit to Ireland, continued his account of his earliest travels in Ireland during the 1950s,. His talk attracted the largest attendance of the season to date, your writer noted visiting members from Scotland, Wales and Ireland! Michael set out to travel on as much of Ireland’s railway system as possible and he recounted how he largely achieved this goal by 1957 – only a very few branch lines eluded him! Like all young people, he had to be careful with his limited resources, but he was aided by the fact that rural Ireland then had many hotels offering Bed and Breakfast for ten shillings (50p). When a rail connection was not available he used buses and on many occasions hitched a lift with commercial travellers and on one occasion, a parish priest. While exploring the Cavan and Leitrim one Sunday, he obtained the loan of a bicycle, but a tyre succumbed to the rough roads. Nothing daunted, he discovered a cycle repair business in the next town, knocked on the door, only to discover that the proprietor was at Mass. The man’s wife fed young Michael, while he waited and when the owner returned and carried out the repair, he would not accept a payment. Michael’s ingenuity knew no bounds and to resolve difficult connections he would write in advance to station masters to ask them have a “Hackney Carriage” waiting when his train arrived - and they did. It was a different world! He illustrated his talk with photographs taken on his father’s “Box Brownie” camera and he acknowledged the skill shown by Area member Richard McLachlan in restoring the images and bringing them out in their full glory. Thus the audience was transported back to 1950s Letterkenny (by the Swilly and the Donegal), the length of the Cavan and Leitrim (clearly his favourite), the Midland Great Western from Inny Jct to Cavan and on to Clones by the Great Northern. Michael was also in time to travel several times on the Sligo Leitrim and Northern Counties before that singular railway closed. Along the way, Michael made many enduring friends among Irish railwaymen and he made more friends tonight with his entertaining account of travels over half a century ago. Next meeting is Charlie Friel - Thursday 19th April 2018 “The GNR(I) lines to Newcastle and Derry” by Charles Friel Archivist, historian and RPSI activist, Charles Friel pays us another visit. He starts with lines closed in 1956 – an illustrated journey along the busy Belfast to Banbridge line, the cross-country extension to meet the BCDR at Newcastle and the sleepy branch to Scarva. He will then present a recording of an evocative BBC NI television programme, largely based on the cine of the late Fred Cooper, made to mark the 50th anniversary of the closure of the fondly-remembered former GN route from Portadown to Londonderry (Foyle Road) in 1965. find details of this and all the Area's activities at - https://irrslondon.com
    1 point
  7. A very good post . the current problems in the city centre show the great weakness of tramways - they have to share the road space with other users. A proper underground system will always be difficult and expensive to build but worth having .
    1 point
  8. Hi everyone, I know it's Tara season but the bubbles are still bouncing out the door and we're at 80% sold out so far across the ivory and orange bubbles. If you're thinking of getting another set to add to the rake or still thinking about taking the plunge our advice is not to wait around too long. The ballasts went within a year of landing and these sold even quicker. It seems some of you are buying a second rake, for weathering perhaps? We will have them on sale at Wexford next weekend and should have some left for Bangor (hopefully!) Cheers, Fran
    1 point
  9. Finally decided to use 3mm cork underlay which I stuck down this morning. I painted the uncorked remainder of the baseboard tops with a quick drying acrylic grey primer. Looks good, some serious track laying should start this evening!
    1 point
  10. Ahem - Anything post 1972 seems modern. Once those sleek BREL Mk2s arrived and goods wagons started to have bogies the end of railway civilisation as we knew it was nigh.
    1 point
  11. Difficult to prevent mass downloading. While the platform I use (smugmug) has a right click disabled option (live on my site) there are still ways and means of downloading files. If you have any questions on smugmug that you want to know about drop me a line. W
    1 point
  12. Modern era? This is now vintage gold!
    1 point
  13. I fear "I may forever rot in the bogie of eternal stench" for facilitating such an infestation of modern rolling stock. I risk being expelled from the B&T members pavilion, and @jhb171achill may never forgive me. Perhaps its just a bad dream . . .
    1 point
  14. Welcome to the dark side Noel.
    1 point
  15. Noel, the sounds coming from locos on the bare ply are quite realistic at the moment without the cork. Might just lay it direct without cork.
    1 point
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