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Showing content with the highest reputation on 19/05/20 in all areas

  1. Another elusive wagon that can be see from time to time on the Irish rail network is the bogie carrying 42' wagon, I first saw the real wagon parked on a siding in Ballina having been included in the consist of a liner train from North wall, the wagon would have originated from the wagon works in Limerick. The reason for the wagon being in Ballina was that a few days previous a bogie timber wagon developed a fault with two of its bogies while en route to Ballina from Waterford and needed replacement bogies, the work was done in Ballina freight yard by jacking up one end of the timber wagon and removing then replacing the bogies at both ends, As I have some surplus MIR bogie wagons I decided to construct the frame and to fit it to the wagon, I loaded four spare ''new'' bogies and the wagon was worked to the MPD by locomotive 083, I recently found a photograph I had taken of the wagon which I have included for comparison purposes,
    10 points
  2. Track down - 4 lines down with 5 very long siding, some of which are between the third and fourth radius as I brought line out wider to create that space. Layout can have 9 full length trains now. Still room for more sidings and the possibility of a fifth line. Anyone offended by sectional track should look away now!
    7 points
  3. Forty five years ago, the sun went down on a chapter in Irish railway history, when the last rural branch line with traditional mixed trains closed. And as the winter sun went down on a bitterly cold but bright afternoon, two days before the closure, I took these. So now the sun must go down on me posting daily pictures, as I need to get more scanned..... 1. Arrival at Loughrea, behind a “C”. A big disappointment that day - sure you can get an oul “C” class to Bray ANY day. I had hoped for a “G” - but it had been removed - for ever at this point - and sent to Tuam to shunt the sugar factory sidings during the winter’s beet “campaign”. (Where did they get that odd terminology for a beet harvest?). By the time the beet was finished a few months later, the “G” would now be homeless.... 2. The sun sets on the last train of the day, on the last branchline, with just two days to go. This is actually a mixed train but there happened to be no goods that day. 3. A goods van in the siding at Dunsandle, en route. Hope you’ve enjoyed the photos, folks.
    5 points
  4. Bit of Soldering done last night
    5 points
  5. Hi Lads, My packet if goodies came so the rigging is 90% done, just need to do the rat lines and source a suitable Cargo hook. Still need to have some 1mm cable or the winch to arrive and some black a white rigging thread and a few other bits n bobs to set it off. Leds going in tonight in the cabin area Heres the status at of Last Saturday,
    4 points
  6. No more purchases from IRM until they stop putting how much I've spent on the front of the parcel!... I've just been sent this photo. Dead man walking.
    4 points
  7. Check out some of DeSelbys builds on RM Web https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/profile/3024-de-selby/content/page/2/&type=forums_topic_post Alan has a liking for little and large GN & NCC engines there is content on a GNR S,Vs, U and am NCC Mogul & a Whippet
    4 points
  8. Thanks gents. I’ll post more videos when I can. Sorry MM - nothing so sophisticated!! It’s an old technology. Wire in tube. A wire in plastic tube runs under the cork to a plastic knob on the baseboard edge. Wires from the frog are switched by a three way switch beside the knob. The white tape shows where the wire comes out of the cork- you can glimpse where it’s attached to the tiebar. It then dives off to the right and is essentially invisible under the quay branch.
    3 points
  9. First track plan done. Hopefully the layout will end up the way I want it. Sorry it ain't square. Made it in a rush. as you can sea there is 10 buildings. They will be a mixture o shops and private houses. Shops include butcher green grocer hardware store 2 standard every day stores. All buildings will be a mix of 1-3 Storie buildings. No section will have a great deal of mix of Stories. Hope you all like. MM
    2 points
  10. Halford's potential substitute. These arrived today in the post using AddressPal to get them to Ireland from UK. Will try some tomorrow and report back if they prove a suitable substitute for Halford's plastic grey primer. Made in the same factory by the same company https://jamesbriggs.co.uk I bought these on Amazon UK. Cost was slightly less than over the counter from Halford's in ROI. Brexit proof too as available from amazon.de (Germany) in Euro.
    2 points
  11. Hi Lads, I only came across these the other day and they arrived in the post today so I tested one on a 12V Battery straight and hey presto they do what it says on the Tin. Perfect. Wow not too over bright either I blew 4 GOW filament bulbs the other day, Bought 6V ones but I'd say they gave me 3V and they went pop on the 6V Supply so I decided to try the Leds with Resistors instead should have some fun sticking them into the lamps on the Puffer later as she is running off of 12V. No need for another power cell! I got them from the shop below. https://www.railwayscenics.com/electrical-and-electronics-lighting-and-leds-3mm-led-lights-3mm-cool-white-12v-water-clear-led-with-integrated-resistor-p-2183.html
    2 points
  12. In preparation for relaying between the 26 & 28 mileposts on the Nenagh Branch, a CWR train visited the branch on Tuesday morning. The train departed Portlaoise PWD Yard at 0810, running to Lisduff to run around in the sidings, before retracing its outward journey as far as Ballybrophy. Upon entering the T3 Possession on the Nenagh Branch the CWR train headed to Birdhill for locomotive 084 to run around the train. On the trip back from Birdhill to Ballybrophy it dropped its load of rails, a process which took well over two hours to drop a total of 30 strings of rail. All photos were taken while adhering to Government restrictions on movement during the COVID19 pandemic, limiting you to a maximum of 5 km from home. Click shorturl.at/HJLMU to view all the images and video.
    2 points
  13. Why I love sectional track, it's just like putting a big train set together, all the geometry has been worked for idiots like me.
    2 points
  14. Class, wonderful. It reeks of 1950s Ireland.
    2 points
  15. Some limited ageing applied
    2 points
  16. Most of the ballasting is now done. Not overly please with it but it's a start.
    2 points
  17. A good example of what can be achieved in 4mm from an etched brass kit. Ian Rathbone & Mike Edge's 4mm model of 800 in GSR lined green livery from a SSM kit. https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/152458-gsr-800-class/page/2/
    1 point
  18. Some years ago my wife and her sister took their mother shopping. One of the things on the list was a new bra for the mother in law. Anyway the expedition was made, the bra was bought and fitted and the old one dumped in the backseat of the car. There the bra lay in full view of anyone looking in the window. Of course I drove around and parked up for quite sometime without spotting the aforementioned garment. It finally came to light when I was in the local builder provider's yard and I went to fold down the seats. Enough said.
    1 point
  19. Package recieved today...
    1 point
  20. That's some progress, it looks fantastic. Have you slept since Friday?
    1 point
  21. Don t worry the will not be a power plant built by him at Tara junction. Great stock by the way MM
    1 point
  22. This has been on the go for years. You can see where the chain saw occasionally cuts the cross timbers but I just renew them as necessary. If you look at the "V" you should just make out the carpet gripper. The mainframe always stays intact.
    1 point
  23. Perfect meticulous realism at Tara Junction again!
    1 point
  24. That sounds nice i have to say. I did nit grew up in the 80s so i will never feel that way about hornby.
    1 point
  25. According to Locos of NCC book it was 81. Found a photo today taken in 1953 of one of the NG tanks at Ballymoney with the UT Crest placed over the NCC letters! Looking for something else of course.
    1 point
  26. Yip, there's something about the peco ones that does it for me! I suppose it's all fuelled by nostalgia. I'm the kind of weirdo who buys old lima and hornby catalogues and flicks through them pretending I'm 10 years old again. That's a dapol crane alright, the tooling like you said is very old, but they still look good for the money.
    1 point
  27. Just thought I would put this up. RB Models in Tipperary still have some Murphy Model 201 class for sale. They have four models, 2x NIR blue and 2x Enterprise livery. It might save someone trawling EBAY if they want one. They are €180 each. I know the interest is on the forth coming "A"'s and 121's at the moment but it might benefit someone. Here is the link. I have no connection at all with the shop but I have bought some locos from them in the past .https://rbmodels.ie/product-category/trains/locomotives/
    1 point
  28. Looks Great now let the trains loose!!!
    1 point
  29. Thanks Mark. There’s a bit of residual friction in the system so once the blades are across they tend to stay put.
    1 point
  30. I'm not sure if they still do it, but McCulloch chainsaws used to have the following advice in the handbook - Chainsaw accidents are rarely trivial. The folding metal sawhorse has some advantages for me, in terms of storage volume and ease of transport. It doesn't get a lot of use, but it's never been used at 'my place'. If I had a great deal of use for one at the home location, then a permanent wooden one would be preferable. It's (saw)horses for courses, I suppose... I do keep one of these with me - if I need anything bigger then there's little point.
    1 point
  31. I'm always wary when using a chainsaw.
    1 point
  32. Some fabulous stuff on show here!
    1 point
  33. I would be very wary about using a metal frame if you use a chain saw to cut firewood.
    1 point
  34. Enjoyed doodling with this kit bashed tri-ang. Have 3 chassis for it, this one, another with running step rails, the third chassis has a plough. A very light bit of weathering on this provincial wagons CIE ex-GSWR 10 ton kit. The little man fell out so bostick to the rescue.
    1 point
  35. A delayed departure from the mines due to loading issues, retro 071 is seen here returning the laden Tara mines train to Lakeview freight yard just before midnight.
    1 point
  36. Electrical connections now complete, and all point motors working off DCC.
    1 point
  37. Its the 6 wheel wagon in this weed-killing train, Barrel at the far end and a 'hut' at this end.
    1 point
  38. Layout room - which is multi-use to put it mildly - was rearranged today - complete uprooting of layout and cupboards. Quick test run down the harbour branch (laid to SLNC standards and a terror to locos) was required of course to check layout was running well - or no worse than usual. Rigorous track cleaning still left faulty and intermittent running. Then I checked the loco wheels - a rub with an IPA soaked cotton bud was most revealing ! FullSizeRender.mov
    1 point
  39. I'm on about the old peco printed back scenes, they look very 1970's and I love them for some reason, I think it's from childhood, not very Irish looking I know apart form some of the country scenes which would pass.
    1 point
  40. I am finally getting around to the mechanical assembly of 52 Class No1. The supply of small Mashima motors appears to be drying up so No 1 is being fitted by a small coreless motor supplied by Chris Gibbons of High Level Kits, the loco will have my usual arrangement of a High Level Road Runner+gearbox should she get to strut her stuff on the main line. I decided to fit conventional wiper pick ups to the loco rather than my usual arrangement of "American" style pick up through the loco and tender frames with the wheels shorted out on one side. The Alan Gibson loco driving wheels are quite spindly and I didn't want to risk a wheel running off true as a result of fitting fine brass wire between the wheel hub and axle. Chassis with driving and bogie wheel sets set up for final assembly & coupling rods ready to be opened up with a broach to fit the crankpin bushes. The cylindrical object on the left is a 21mm gauge back to back gauge bought from TMD the predecessor of Studio Scale Models many years ago. The loco mainframes in the background are for a 551 Class (Midland E) 0-6-0T , I assembled and painted the chassis about 4 years ago, but has been dismantled for painting in GSR Grey, the chassis was originally painted in Railmatch Weathered Black my original match for GSR grey, but does not match the grey matched from a sample of GSR paint. I decided to fit a mounting plate for the power pick ups using a pieces of scrap nickle silver mounted between the frames above the ash pan, with 10BA bolts for securing the actual pick up plate. I tapped two holes in the plate 10BA with a tap mounted in a pin chuck. Bolts screwed into the plate then soldered in position before fitting to chassis. Pick up mounting plate soldered to frames with solder fillet Underside of frames showing fixing bolts for pick up plates, these will be trimmed to length when the pick up are fitted. I originally assembled the loco with a compensated chassis with a fixed rear and rocking leading axle, unfortunately the hornblocks and axles were slightly out of square. I un-soldered the hornblocks on one side and re-aligning the hornblocks using an assembly jig and coupling rods to ensure that the chassis does not bind. Something from the Dark Ages Possibly my last scratch built loco 567 dating from the late 1980s, the body is in plasticard on milled brass main frames. 567 formerly Ln Class Duke seems to have been the prototype for rebuilding the Midland Standard Goods, but although considered a success no further members of her class were re-built and the loco was withdrawn as non-standard following the Milne Report in the 1940s. Like the prototype my model of 567 included parts from an older locomotive in this case the mainframes, wheels and motor intended for a Dundalk Newry & Greenore 0-6-0ST, I originally planned to build a DNGR tank using the body from a GEM Crew Special Tank and a set of Alan Gibson milled main frames. I abandoned building the DNGR tank as it would have been easier to scratchbuild the loco than re-build the GEM kit as a 21mm gauge Irish loco. I assembled 567 in plasticard as I was living in a shared falt at the time that was not exactly conductive to kitchen table metal working. To a degree the chassis was almost "state of the art" by the standards of the time with beam compensation, Magib wheels and an Anchorage DS10 motor with a cast brass gear cradle, unfortunately she did not run very well a combination of the limitations of the materials and my assembly, though she looked reasonably like an Midland engine of the Post WW1 era. Visually the biggest drawback was the need to cut a chunk out of the boiler and ramp the cab floor to fit the motor and gears Despite loosing some bits and pieces 567 has stood up remarkably well with little evidence of parts warping or twisting or joints failing. In particular the laminated running boards with their 3 ply construction have held up very well with little warping or distortion. The question at this stage is whether to leave her in a display cabinet and build a new loco from scratch or renew the loco in classical Midland fashion like by renewing the loco in motoring parlance by jacking up the number plates and incorporating all the re-usable components into a new locomotive just like the real Duke or 567.
    1 point
  41. 112, 143 and 192. I'm having some issues with 112. I don't think one of the bogies is picking up at all. The wheels are turning on both bogies
    1 point
  42. The Plough Vans were introduced in 1904 for use with the new ballast hopper trains Padraic O'Cuimin notes in Wagon Stock of the MGWR that 4 Ballast Vans 42,43,46&48 were introduced in 1883 one of which 232A was in Departmental service in 1970. A number of GSWR Ballast Brakes from the same period survived into the 1960s in use of lifting trains, they were long wheelbase outside framed vehicles with a birdcage look out at one end and a large compartment for accommodating the men and their tools, possibly doubling as a mess and sleeping van. The 1883 Ballast Vans are not listed in POC's list of MGWR GAs drawings and diagrams and do not appear in the IRRS Compendium of MGWR Goods Vehicle Drawings. Intriguingly his schedule of drawings includes a Diagram which he prepared of a 1874 ballast wagon with "Guards Compartment" in . It might be worth asking Richard McLaughlin whether POCs personal MGWR archive was bequeated to the IRRS. Richard Chowan's No 11 may be a model of one of the Incline Brake Vans built by Metropolitan for the MGW in 1883, POC had no particulars of their appearance but they were listed as 1 compartment 4 wheel vehicles.
    1 point
  43. Sent to me this afternoon by a very shy modeller He's a much better modeller than photographer MTK NIR Railbus, no box number unfortunately
    1 point
  44. Nice kits and good prices as well.
    1 point
  45. I finally got around to weathering one of the IRM Ballast wagons. Don't know why it took so long as these were the first IRM wagons I got back 2 or 3 years ago when they first hit the market? Perhaps it was because the natural colour of the ballast wagon model doesn't scream 'I need to be weathered'. Even more impressed with these original wagons. Real beauts. One done, 11 more to do. Have to handle with care there are so many super detailed parts on these. It took a while. No airbrush was harmed doing these. The load also got a little wash.
    1 point
  46. Not a lot of progress of late trying to decide whether to finish detailing the locos or assemble the tender and adjusting to winter arriving in June after a long Indian summer. The tender assembly is relatively straightforward with slot and tab assembly for the main components. I used copperclad sleeper strip to keep the outside framing vertical before soldering in place, I also moved the rear fixing bolt backwards to clear the rear axle and act as a fixing point for the coupler. Tender superstructure, after three locos I think I finally figured out how the tender coal chute assembly is supposed to fit together. Still some cleaning up on the soldered joints, maybe its time to buy a resistance soldering unit! View of the top of the tender, I need to fabricate a tank filler and a (removable?)tank top/coal plate. Backplate with firehole doors added, I will add some basic plumbing and a regulator handle. Test fit backplate, cab splashers narrowed to suit a 21mm gauge model, splasher sides incorporate an representation of the main frames. Body securing bolt to be cut off flush with (wooden) cab floor, excess solder to be removed from inside cab before final detailing, (reversing wheel, backplate detail, handrails, boiler fittings. Next job is to assemble the tender underframe and loco & tender brake gear sub-assemblies.
    1 point
  47. As mentioned in my blog, have recently completed two SLNCR brake vans. Construction was fairly straightforward, with a plasticard shell, detailed with Evergreeen microstrip on Tyrconnel models whitemetal chassis. Initial painting was by using Halford's grey primer spray can, then hand lettered with a white gel pen. The first picture shows them in this initial, raw state. Then used a fibreglass pen to rub down the paint an lettering to make it appear worn. Afterwards a wash of 'dirty thinners' [Precision roof dirt], was loaded on by brush, holding the van at an angle. This means all the dark colouring is pulled into scratches and cracks, like dirt would be on the real thing... The next pics show my GW model rivet press, which I use to emboss rivets onto micro strip for wagon strapping, plus the Freestone Models pack of weathering powders. There a quite a few options out there these days, but these are the ones I get on with. The littlle make up tubs make them easy to store and apply. Before the weathering powders though, I spend time painting the metal work - mainly wheels in this case. A blend of Humbrol 53 [gunmetal], matt black and leather [63] give a nicely worn effect, as first described by Martyn Welch in The Art of Weathering. The Freestone powders were then dusted on using a medium sized paint brush, as appropriate. The key here has to be to work to a suitable photo. It doesn't have to be the wagon in question [though this helps], but do work on what you can SEE, not what you imagine. A lot of the powder gets brushed off and can be saved in a new 'generic dirt' tub for future use. The final [and very important] trick is to then give your model a dusting of talc. This has the effect of softening the work and gives a neat, dusty, effect. Obviously, much depends on the level of grime you are applying and in both case here, this was pretty heavy. I feel it looks ok, though that is for others to judge. Hope this helps!
    1 point
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