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Showing content with the highest reputation on 12/09/20 in all areas

  1. Today, 12/09/20, two days after my 78th Birthday, our Postman delivered a wee parcel. To my delight it is my 121 from The Paddy Murphy Stable. This delivery made me thing a wee bit. I thought of my age, my model railway, the locomotives I am running; as I prepare for a professional Filming Session of Old Blarney this Thursday. Most importantly, my thoughts turned to the man who made it possible for me to have models of Irish Locomotives, and rolling stock, Paddy Murphy. His production of accurate models of the 141 and 181 Locomotives as used on our Railway System, and each of the models he has produced since then made me feel extremely grateful to him. Did I do anything - yes. I telephoned the great man. He was taking a walk in a Park and took the time to have a conversation with me. I would like to extend an invitation to each individual on this forum who reads, contributes and has an interest in Model Railways. Please add your personal thanks to Paddy for all he had done for you, your hobby and the RPSI by adding your name and a message to him through this page. My sincere thanks, to you, Paddy Murphy, David White.
    11 points
  2. Bit of weathering done & loads added to the flat wagons. Few more details & we should be there. I kinda figured that the loco would not last too long in works grey so dialled up the dirt on the loco. Material on the wagons is just a random load of timber, sleepers, chairs, chains etc.
    8 points
  3. Every now and then I change the stock on my layout completely over to British rolling stock to enjoy my little collection of models. Hope someone enjoys.
    5 points
  4. My understanding is that it was only finished in works grey and never got a coat of paint. From the few photos I seen, it only ever appears to be in unmarked works grey. I kept the chassis dark, as this came from one of the DSER tanks (No. 64) which was quickly plated in the works to work the train. The wagos appear to be standard DSER 13'6" box wagons with some plated added. There does not appear to be much information on this train, so it's the best interpreation I can come up with. BTW, many thanks to all for their likes and comments. Ken
    3 points
  5. I can still remember the sunday evening when I stumbled upon 141 Class no.156, while rummaging through my dad's collection back in 2012. Straight away, it reignited my childhood interest in irish railways, and I haven't looked back since. To see a model so finely detailed, just blew me away at the time, and it has continued since then. The man is a legend, and without doubt has inspired what we see today from IRM. He has topped it off with 121 class, which might be his last, or maybe not. Thank you Mr Murphy.
    3 points
  6. I can only reiterate the above sentiments. I have been interested in Irish Railways and Irish Model Railways since I was in Primary School. My interest has always been GNRI and more recently NCC/UTA with my Larne Harbour Project, but I have a fair collection of Murphy Models including a 141, 181, NIR 111, Cravens and Mk 2's. Why? I know they will never be part of my layout, but I couldn't resist buying them because they are so brilliant, the standard is so high and they are a joy to own and look at. Thank you Paddy Murphy for having the foresight and initiative to take on such a project. It has been a resounding success. You are a legend in Irish Railway Modelling.
    3 points
  7. One of Ken's photos posted earlier in this thread;-
    3 points
  8. Railway Modeller have a review in the current Rag.
    3 points
  9. As a very novice railway enthusiast and with just a few locos and wagons and limited time and knowhow, i would like the option of a few weathered locos/wagons from the manufacturer.. They are certainly not as good as the ones we see by modellers here but i think they still look more realistic than the shining box new ones,...Imo.
    2 points
  10. I very much like that idea. I have a fondness for Black 5s, and the standard British designs. I'm following the progress of the 3MT project over there in the Republic of Cummins with great interest - a perfect "new-build" branch engine. I am also interested in the "rail blue" era, which I recall from a few holidays in the Federation of Boris in 1970-4.... might gather a few blue things at some stage! Great Pictures, from Ballyercall-in-the-Wolds, County Somerset........!
    2 points
  11. 2 points
  12. The Olympians started with the RHs (Leyland) in 1990 and finished with the RVs (Volvo), the last of which were delivered in 1999. The last Olympian finished in service with Dublin bus in December 2012. There’s a bit of history on them here https://www.classicbuses.co.uk/+Dublin-Bus.html The two tone green started with the KD Bombardier buses in the early 80s. Was modified with orange stripe and Dublin Bus branding in 1987 (as part of CIE forming Dublin Bus, Bus Eireann and IR). I’m not sure exactly when the last green bus bowed out but suspect it was late 2000, early 2001?
    2 points
  13. The RPSI heritage set alone has a couple of Park Royals (c. 1955), a 1449 series CIE built open second (pre-)laminate (1958), and buffet car 2421 (1956) all sitting on 61'6 chassis. 1916 is not one of the original 1950s built brakes but was converted in the '70s. Originally it was a a 2162 series suburban composites (1956), the external and internal structure of which is well known and wouldn't take a lot to reverse engineer the conversion to its original composite condition. Some earlier Bredin designed GSR-built coaches also exist in preservation from the Cork-Dublin expresses or the Cork-Rosslare boat trains but these are on 57', 60' or 66' chassis some on 6 wheel bogies which will not see the light of day, although they may be some hope for the former group due to the longevity as primary and secondary stock.
    2 points
  14. Early in 2018 Wexford Model Railway Club started an ambitious project to develop a modular exhibition layout in O gauge. New techniques were deployed for building base-boards using Scandinavian 6mm birch-ply hot-glued to the baseboard which are then strengthened with glass fibre/PVA. Advanced wiring and custom electronic control boards were used. Simple but robust trestles were developed which fold flat. A couple of photos for the record: By Easter 2018, the early stages of the project were in place and exhibited at the Wexford Exhibition:
    1 point
  15. That GN cement wagon just about sums up what I like about Irish railways. Use what you have got to make a low cost vehicle, make do and mend, keep things going. It maybe does not look good to the public but it makes our hobby interesting.
    1 point
  16. What can we say to paddy only thank you for what he has done over the years. When i stared there was nothing except repaints and or scratch build your own which i and others had to do. Paddy you're a legend. thanks paddy warb Noel Dodd
    1 point
  17. I absolutely second, third and fourth that. Paddy, you've been an inspiration to a whole new generation of Irish modellers. You've enabled exhibition-standard modelling of the period from 1961 to the present with consistent high quality. Very many thanks from an owner of a 121, soon to be two, a good few black'n'tan 141s, and several "Craven" coaches!
    1 point
  18. Hi Buz OK, the first thing to remember is that these are (British) LMS coaches, using moulds presumably used for such things in the British market. they are unfortunately not even remotely close in appearance to ANYTHING which ever ran on the CIE system. To an Irish modeller, they ARE however of use to a UTA modeller - as they are very close indeed to several designs used by the NCC lines north of Belfast, right to the end of steam and into the early 70s. But not CIE. However, needs must. As many comment here, over and over again, and very rightly so, we are spoiled with the great and increasing amount of ready to run Irish stuff now. But with a small market, and pre-1972, a BEWILDERING array of all sorts of non-standard designs of locomotives, carriages and wagons, even if the market was huge, IRM, Murphy, Provincial Wagons, 00 Works, SSM and all the rest would need to live to be 400 years old before they'd get through half of them. The correct coaches to operate in the Bachmann set would be of an absolute multitude of types, for which it would even be difficult to get drawings to scratch-build, let alone buy off the shelf. So, British repaints are the best realistic compromise. Livery wise, the shades of green are correct, though the line below window level is far too thick and the "flying snails" are a bit too big, and the wrong shape. But I'm nit-picking here, although a rivet-counter will appreciate what I'm saying. For the "two-foot rule", they are absolutely fine. The cravens went into traffic in 1963 and were used mostly on main lines. Some old wooden carriages, like the model, DID still exist in traffic, and as other posts I have made will illustrate, green coaches were in use for a few years more. However, here we run into two problems. 1. Those carriages still operating in green were NOT in THIS livery; this is the pre-1955 darker green livery, same as used on green steam engines, station paintwork, CIE buses, CIE lorries and CIE-just-about-everything. Except, that is, passenger railway carriages and diesel locomotives! A handful of older coaches still retained a much-scruffyish older lined green until the closures around 1961, especially in West Cork - but anything green beyond that was the lighter colour. 2. Some old wooden coaches did work well into the 1960s, and few were still used on Dublin and Cork locals until as late as 1974. But these were repainted black'n'tan. So, in answer to your question, the answer is "not really". Yes, some green ran with cravens when new. But this is the wrong green. Some timber coaches ran with Cravens - but they didn't look like these! Hope that helps, and nobody died of boredom going through it all!
    1 point
  19. The whole train looks great, nice work. Would the loco be that light a grey compared to the wagons?
    1 point
  20. Class 56 hauled MGR train being looped in Ashburton grove..
    1 point
  21. I've noticed MM B121 comes without lamp irons on either buffer beam. They were on the locomotives from the start. Is it just an oversight on the ( excellent) model?
    1 point
  22. Thanks Tim. The 6mm cork was glued down with strong builders' neat PVA and weighed down until set over a few days. The rails were laid down precisely in accordance with printed templates (Templot) placed directly on the baseboard cork. The rails were then tacked in place with track nails mainly on the outer sleepers to avoid compacting them. The cork was cut away at an angle to provide a shoulder for the ballast. Finally, dry ballast was dusted over the rails and distributed/shaped with a fine brush. This was then wetted by spraying with much water/wash-up liquid mix and a strong solution of builders' PVA was added by dropper. Once set over a few days this holds the rails in place in a concrete-like grip!
    1 point
  23. Dirty, but still subtle, while the correct track gauge (nicely blasted and painted) makes the whole scene hangs together really well.
    1 point
  24. Link to a review of the Southern Railway version of the model and the potential challenges in fitting a decoder. https://cpineroad.blogspot.com/2020/07/00-works-class-0330-0-6-0-saddleback.html The buyer re-built the loco with a two stage High level gearbox and Mashima motor because he was not satisfied with the slow running characteristics on the loco
    1 point
  25. In a Hand painted Attempt to Model a More “Bockety & Battered” AU as some had flashing and Bumpers removed in later life. Modelled here is Ex GNR Regal CIE AU343 (ZY1683) on a “Dun Dealgan” Service *Super Smooth 3D Printed Kit by Tiny Model Bus & Coach**
    1 point
  26. I think most of the continental European networks kept 3 classes into the 1950s, some possibly longer. I think Germany even had four classes - fourth being on rural branch lines consisting of unpadded wooden bench-equipped four wheelers. The trouble with having too many classes is having to provide for catering facilities on longer journeys. I know that in Scotland the LNER had composite diners on the Edinburgh-Aberdeen expresses where seperate first and third diners would have been overkill but trying to provide for three classes must have been interesting for the NCC. Did they have any such thing as a tri-composite diner?
    1 point
  27. Signal box interiour now completed:
    1 point
  28. The forum software had to be upgraded to keep abreast of security requirements and other unseen elements, but the developers also tweaked the design as part of the upgrade so it automatically implemented that change, too. Nothing can be done about it. I appreciate some users don't like change, but as with previous changes no one's going to care too much about it in another couple of weeks when everyone has become familiar with the new layout.
    1 point
  29. Thought this might be of interest, a short article written in August 1984 giving first impressions on the then almost brand-new CIÉ MkIII coaches:
    1 point
  30. as the buses were a massive success, I'm already looking forward to the next bus release !!!
    1 point
  31. And we're back up and accessible, thank you all for your concern, much appreciated!
    1 point
  32. And very soon you will be able to enjoy this view from the comfort of the train-there will be no need to walk up or down that road.....
    1 point
  33. Correct the view is not as good as the opposite side- at that particular location the bushes were removed to examine the culvert which was uncovered by us earlier in the year and found to be in excellent condition- the remainder of the trees on that side will be left in situ. When we first visited the site a few years ago we were unable to see the former line towards Galway as it was heavily overgrown and it did need some amount of clearance and we are all delighted with the results This is the view now....
    1 point
  34. Another intensive day of work took place at Maam cross yesterday, many thanks to the volunteers from near and far who put in such a fantastic performance, Level crossing gates and gate posts were put into position alongside the main R336 Maam to Maam cross road The buffer stop on the standard gauge track had its timber block replaced as the original timber had decayed and was life expired. Vegetation clearance took place at the Galway end of the station where the Cutting crew from Cork done a superb job in opening out a long lost culvert, Temporary track was laid into the shed, this will allow for the safe storage of a locomotive and rolling stock Vegetation clearance was undertaken along side the boundary fence and level crossing gates on the R336 road-improving the view and increasing the awareness of the project for passing motorists. A selection of photos from yesterday....
    1 point
  35. Update on Little Siddington: work continues to develop more of the countryside areas around the layout with plaster contouring, painting, static grass application, wire fencing and telegraph pole installation, addition of extension to head-shunt to form a branch in the centre of the layout (which will be adaptable to take a variety of club/members' layouts) etc.
    1 point
  36. Easy enough in the real world. No 1 cab has the Murphy Models plate and the short handrail.
    1 point
  37. I keep an eye on most things Irish on eBay and whereas a few models make some serious money it comes down to the actual model and who is bidding on it The 171 as we know was an exclusive model sold only by Marks Models and therefore some collectors would have missed out on it If you look at the bidding it topped off at €200 before the last 2 bidders started to bid against one another In the last few weeks other IE liveried locos made around €170 with a CIE black one making €185 so dont rush out thinking you are going to make a killing And remember eBay will charge you 10.7% of the final value so our seller will drop around €40 for the privilege
    1 point
  38. 2x20s pass the factory sidings working an empty tanker train. IMG_4927.MOV
    1 point
  39. Last bit of work done before the clubrooms closed last week:
    1 point
  40. More progress with scenic base cement and base-coat painting:
    1 point
  41. A couple of pics showing additional work completed on building the scenery base around the tracks:
    1 point
  42. Further progress with the installation of the second road bridge over the main lines and goods-yard head-shunt line. Parts for this scratch-built bridge were made by David McCabe using 3-D printing! A road-bed will be added shortly and the scenery banks completed ready for grassing etc.
    1 point
  43. More progress on Little Siddington in preparation for the Exhibition at Easter 2019 in Wexford. Plans are in place also to exhibit at the Ulster MRC Exhibition at end-August 2019. Note that the electrical connections are being simplified for transport by putting panel plugs/sockets on each board to be connected by flying cables during set-up! The work on the fiddle-yard has since been completed also and a second bridge and signals are in preparation off-site. So, a photographic tour up and down the line:
    1 point
  44. So....... 423 has been painted, however before finishing the weathering I want to stencil the numbers on, however I need to get some yellow ink to blend with the white I have to create the light yellow normally used. While waiting, I decided to move over to building some kits. Those lovely kits from @Mayner were not going to make themselves. so I decided to get stuck into the Fish Van. Really nice kit and very detailed. Started by cleaning up the fret as there was a lot of tarnishing from the etching process, however this did not clean up very well as will be seen from the finished van. However despite the tarnishing it did solder together very well. It will be painted anyway, so will not really make much difference. The detail for the underframes and brakes is very good, however quite fiddly, particularly setting up in 21mm and compensated - there is very little room left for all other elements. Thoroughly enjoyable build and came together in a day. It will add nicely to the layout of Irish rolling stock. A quick snap of 423 with the van. Paint job on the loco is coming together rather nicely. Given that the van kit came together so well, I decided to have a go with the Worsley Works kit of a GSWR 3 six wheeler. These kits are little more that the basic sides and ends, as it has the sides, underframes, roof, ends and six wheel chassis frets included. They are much more detailed that I was expecting with separate etches for the ventilators over the doors, pilot holes for hinges, grab handles and door handles. So while the sides were in the fret, I added the ventilators, door windows, and profiled the side. Hinges were then added, with door and grab handles inserted (well one side anyway - it's a bit fiddly). The underframes and buffer beams were added to the coach floor in preparation for the chassis. Nice to work on kits for a change as someone has already done the thinking and provided slots & tabs etc!
    1 point
  45. Work is continuing on Little Siddington including finalising the platforms, adding four long head-shunts onto the fiddle-yard and test runs on a weekly basis:
    1 point
  46. Totally agree. The complex track-work on Little Siddington is based on the classic GWR/BR WR prototype stations between Bristol and South Wales. Obviously in time we will be adding more detail including working semaphores and scenery. Showing the lay-out as a work-in-progress allows us to explain how we put the innovative base-boards/electronics together (before they get covered), road-test the layout as well as getting feedback from modellers and the public.
    1 point
  47. Since Easter, a small but active team at Wexford have kept up the work and the layout was shown at Crosshaven in August. Since then much progress has been made. The layout will be shown at the Dublin Exhibition at end-October as a work-in-progress. Come and see how far we have got!
    1 point
  48. BosKonay and Heirflick, Thank you for your complements about Old Blarney. I have not made any contributions to our forum for some considerable time, just happened to have a quick search recently where I found this page, and was very proud to read your comments. Old Blarney will be exhibited at the Falkirk Model Railway Show this November, weather permitting! The last time we were there we were snow-bound and it was three months before I got my rolling stock home. Details of this exhibition are at: http://www.falkirkmrc.co.uk/ 29th - 30th November 2014 - Forth Valley College, Falkirk ... Old Blarney is available for exhibition. This model railway lives at the Perth and District Model Railway Club premises, the layout, and rolling stock are mine and are also used on my home model railway in Newburgh, Fife, Scotland. Old Blarney visited Cultra, two years past this November. If anyone wishes to contact me regarding Old Blarney, please do so. David J. White.
    1 point
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