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Showing content with the highest reputation on 13/09/20 in all areas

  1. First mock up and timber cut for the school on cumberland street south and to the rear of st andrews church
    10 points
  2. Today, 12/09/20, two days after my 78th Birthday, our Postman delivered a wee parcel. To my delight it is my 121 from The Paddy Murphy Stable. This delivery made me thing a wee bit. I thought of my age, my model railway, the locomotives I am running; as I prepare for a professional Filming Session of Old Blarney this Thursday. Most importantly, my thoughts turned to the man who made it possible for me to have models of Irish Locomotives, and rolling stock, Paddy Murphy. His production of accurate models of the 141 and 181 Locomotives as used on our Railway System, and each of the
    8 points
  3. Paddy Murphy has achieved the impossible with significant financial risk to himself. Having to spread out production over years with coaches and locomotives arriving in different years he had to rely on the hope that buyers would hang-in there to build their collections. We did and were rewarded with quality and levels of detail that put the big producers to shame. His original cooperation with Llma and Bachman proved that demand existed. Lima's willingness to do short runs was the start of an economic model that demonstrated the viability of meeting that demand. Paddy has
    7 points
  4. To be honest, I think the prototypical original livery is the culprit here - it does not scale down well perhaps - and certainly doesn’t lend itself to detail and contrast. The decorated samples of the 121 look fantastic in B and T but this anaemic greyness does them no favours. Some subtle weathering of panel lines etc will quickly bring out the true greatness of the model and blend the handrails in.
    6 points
  5. More progress on scenery. I have decided to go with the printed factory at least for now. Three storage tanks which were fashioned from a piece of plastic pipe which was lying around in the garage hides the fact that it has no dept on one end and some bushes and a tree do the same on the other. The tanks still need tops and some detail.
    5 points
  6. Sometimes dreams do come true, and this certainly is the case with Paddy's great model locos. I have thirteen of his 141/181s, just couldn't stop acquiring them when they came out. Wonderful models. Thank you Paddy for your energy and magnificent contribution to Irish railway modelling. David Belfast
    3 points
  7. Deserves to be a member of Aosdána for service to Irish culture !
    3 points
  8. Many many thanks to Paddy Murphy.Going back to the early 90s, not in your wildest dreams could we imagine how much the Irish scene could be transformed particularly with the 141/181s.Now with 121s and 001 class on the horizon,happy days.
    3 points
  9. You can most certainly add my name to the well-wishers here. It was the bravery of the initial runs that I admire most. The size of the market for highly detailed, quality RTR was I would say pretty much unknown. The locomotives are always going to be the most difficult thing to build yourself. Having them RTR has unlocked the door for others to follow and indeed build upon that work. Philip Murphy.
    3 points
  10. Thats all good and fine, but what about the yellow handrails on the 121's?
    3 points
  11. If you like, you can afford it, you buy it. It is your railway. I have written this in the past - It is your railway and thus, you run that which you you wish to run on it. I have two Irish Layouts. I have LMS Locomotives and Rolling Stock - In my World these are not London Midland and Scottish - they are - Londonderry Manorhamilton and Sligo (LMS) on my railway. South Eastern and Chatham stock - on my railway - Sligo Enniskillen and Colloney or anything else one can think of! Happy modelling. Old Blarney.
    3 points
  12. Considering that like a lot of people, Covid 19 has given me a lot of free time and I've been able to step back into the world of building models again. My latest project was a repaint of a Oxford Janus that I acquired extremely cheaply off a friend as he had pruchased the train pack and only wanted the wagons. 30 quid cheaper and I was the proud owner of a handsome smooth running model but an ICI liveried loco stuck out among my Irish collection so a quick repaint over the weekend into a CIE inspired green turned 'Richard' into CSÉ No.1 'Edel' Just ne
    2 points
  13. Plenty of time yet George. The RAF officially commemorates BoB the Sunday after 15th Sep. But nicely remembered. The last BoB pilot alive is actually an Irishman and is living in Dublin at the age of over 100- Gp Capt Hemingway DFC
    2 points
  14. The waggon is a 1925 Foden C type,they're good for 30 mph tops,the Greenaways who own her have quite a collection,i bought a an Aveling roller of them back in the 80's.but thats another story.Andy
    2 points
  15. Sweet, I must say the kings look good in Blue, and I do confess to getting a GWR king in Easons in the 80's for a Birthday, Tender drive, Still goes too, even chipped it and badly weathered! Surprised you did not have a date with Sir Keith Park Leslie this weekend.
    2 points
  16. Paddy, The standards you set and the models you delivered make me very PROUD to tell anyone who asks that my interest in model trains is Irish and only Irish. Returning to the hobby was easy because your models were available and I have enjoyed every minute of it. Now looking forward to a whole new era. So, I'm saying thank you for that and for everything you've done for the Irish model railway scene.
    2 points
  17. If you want authentic weathering Tonto, Flying Scotsman and lately Noel Von of this parish are your men
    2 points
  18. God-given day today, so after church (at St Andrews, which suit Warb of Barrow Street) we were off to Didcot where the King (Edward II) was on it's last runs before its boiler certificate runs out. On train rides with three six wheelers - for the nice sound, by the way. MAQ03586.MP4 Then on the way home..... MAQ03600.MP4 Turn the sound up! And chasing steam in the Smart Car .... MAQ03601.MP4 15mph uphill, I forgot to keep the camera running as we overtook!
    1 point
  19. Right, back in from dinner to celebrate the Smart Car's driver's birthday. Yes, Lord White, we'd put the indicator on to "pretend" we were part of the convoy and then could enjoy the experience a bit longer. Thanks, Andy for the Heads-up on the owner and details. Steam Lorries are serious vehicles and make a decent sound - if you listen to the roadside shot. Thanks, George, and yes, I agree with you that the Kings look really good in the short-lived BR Express Loco Blue. Merchant Navies and A1s, likewise, but NOT the A4s - not a patch on the LNER Garter Blue livery. I'm away fr
    1 point
  20. Looks great, really impressive. Before my time/era, but must say the signal looks really good- great photos Patrick.
    1 point
  21. Yep, between young Patrick M and I we can let you have that train by return of post. Mind you, you'll have to build my vans from the kits! I think the one behind the loco is the 10ton variety, rather than its smaller sister. Leslie
    1 point
  22. It's probably more the timing of your critique, and how quickly and willing you are to do so without having the model, that is irksome. At the same time, feedback is very important, and if there's another model released in five years featuring handrails, this feedback may help towards a manufacturers decision on hand rails.
    1 point
  23. Perfect, then - colour light shniggles!
    1 point
  24. Best wishes to Paddy for all he has done for the hobby of Irish railway modelling.
    1 point
  25. I’m a late eighties early nineties modeller so I can get away with the signals!
    1 point
  26. Just wait for the rest of the “snag list”....
    1 point
  27. Hi Jhb171achill Thanks for that informative answer that makes it a definite NO for me I am no rivet counter but I do like a good resemblance which it seems that coach just doesn't have. I would not have a clue where Irish steam is concerned something I will have to correct over time. regards John
    1 point
  28. To add to Mike's comment about Make do 'n Mend - after WW2, the West German Bundesbahn had many six wheelers (new bodies on old wooden ones?) - nick-named "Thunderboxes" I believe. Rightly so, as they were very noisy to travel in. That said, I was delighted to clamber into one of them on a local train on the Rheine - Emden line and be hauled at a full SEVENTY mph behind a coal-burning three-cylinder Pacific. I understand that the B&CDR six wheelers were pretty wild at sixty mph, but these were a bit more modern and I suspect the Bundesbahn track was better in 1969 than the Bangor line
    1 point
  29. My understanding is that it was only finished in works grey and never got a coat of paint. From the few photos I seen, it only ever appears to be in unmarked works grey. I kept the chassis dark, as this came from one of the DSER tanks (No. 64) which was quickly plated in the works to work the train. The wagos appear to be standard DSER 13'6" box wagons with some plated added. There does not appear to be much information on this train, so it's the best interpreation I can come up with. BTW, many thanks to all for their likes and comments. Ken
    1 point
  30. Without the selfless divine intervention of St Patrick, and him saving his four, now five (?), apostles from the wilderness, we would not be where we are today. I remember seeing my first 141 - it was on a DC Kits stand at Stafford Exhibition, at the back - it was really the orangeness that I spotted first - I had gone to get some bits for a chap I'd built a layout for - I had no idea anything so exotic as an actual Irish model would even exist - I bought it and was astounded (still am) at how good it was.
    1 point
  31. Wow! Didn't take long did it?
    1 point
  32. Oh! Jhb you are so right and definately a good thing for a shunting layout the temptations are growing, not helped by that Georgeconna posting pictures. Thats a terrible thing to do!
    1 point
  33. I can still remember the sunday evening when I stumbled upon 141 Class no.156, while rummaging through my dad's collection back in 2012. Straight away, it reignited my childhood interest in irish railways, and I haven't looked back since. To see a model so finely detailed, just blew me away at the time, and it has continued since then. The man is a legend, and without doubt has inspired what we see today from IRM. He has topped it off with 121 class, which might be his last, or maybe not. Thank you Mr Murphy.
    1 point
  34. I can only reiterate the above sentiments. I have been interested in Irish Railways and Irish Model Railways since I was in Primary School. My interest has always been GNRI and more recently NCC/UTA with my Larne Harbour Project, but I have a fair collection of Murphy Models including a 141, 181, NIR 111, Cravens and Mk 2's. Why? I know they will never be part of my layout, but I couldn't resist buying them because they are so brilliant, the standard is so high and they are a joy to own and look at. Thank you Paddy Murphy for having the foresight and initiative to take on such a project. It ha
    1 point
  35. Not really! You've GNR designs, which are - GNR.... and the NCC's "somersaults". Neither are like the standard British upper quads at all.... Remember, the railways here were all built before the border was, so there's no "British / Irish" divide. Having said that, the whole Ballyercall looks mighty with either set of rolling stock.........
    1 point
  36. As a very novice railway enthusiast and with just a few locos and wagons and limited time and knowhow, i would like the option of a few weathered locos/wagons from the manufacturer.. They are certainly not as good as the ones we see by modellers here but i think they still look more realistic than the shining box new ones,...Imo.
    1 point
  37. One of Ken's photos posted earlier in this thread;-
    1 point
  38. 1 point
  39. Really like that finish in the yard. It captures that slightly rough appearance, with little maintenance, really well. My type of layout. Less is definitely more.
    1 point
  40. 20 years ago we weren't complaining about the plastic looking hand rails on our 'Irish' railway models. I wonder why that was?
    1 point
  41. I have managed to acquire some 75 Graham Roose original slides mostly from the 1990's with copyright which will keep me busy for the next few days in between hopefully commissioning 121's. The 1990's are the period Glengarriff is representing so these slides will come in very handy. A couple of samples
    1 point
  42. The handrails shouldn’t be damaged if the model is handled correctly. Lifting the model by the fuel tank is the proper way to handle. If we want finely detailed models we have to handle appropriately.
    1 point
  43. Think I'll wait for the Silver Fox version.
    1 point
  44. The beet bank surface is a Scalescenes concrete download which unfortunately looks like it could pass for the marble floor of an OO scale cathedral. It will probably get the same treatment as the yard if I can figure out a way to deal with it in order to prevent an unholy mess when glue and isopropyl alcohol are applied. As with the yard area the bank has given me much grief over the years while trying to compose the scene. It has been longer, shorter, higher and on a curve and has had several different surfaces. I'm hoping to make peace with it soon! As for the back scene, the sky and clouds
    1 point
  45. Building a convincing model railway can require as much artistry as practical and technical skills. Knowing what to leave out can be as important as what to put in and for me, this certainly has 'the look', so always enjoy seeing updates.
    1 point
  46. Agreed it catches the remoteness well and the little hives of activity that make up rural areas at a time when most if not all went by rail. Today the line would be host to 2600/ 2700 railcars and the carparks fill up the old yards - the crane long gone ! to be replaced by yards of palisade fencing, tarmac and gratuitous miles of yellow lines and notices stating the obvious. Please keep the line "timelocked " as it is! Robert
    1 point
  47. I must admit this is one of the nicest layouts Irish wise out there. Captures the feel of the countryside excellently.
    1 point
  48. I have now scanned the 416 prints acquired with copyright and as they are from 2 trips made in June and September 1956 plus a number from a trip in 1957 I think that they should be put on flickr in a separate album as this will give a snapshot of that time period. The photographer took the trouble to record the coach numbers for some of the views. Below is a sample of 3 views at Cork, Albert Quay. I have added the captions to the prints.
    1 point
  49. The upper section of the Glen Afton Branch was severed from the main line system and the Rotowaro Township removed with the development of open cast coal mining in the Rotowaro area during the 1970s. Rotowaro late 2005 at a time when locos in matching colour schemes were extremely rare. Toll an Australian logistics company had recently acquired the operating assets of the railway from the former owners Tranzrail, the Government later bought out Tolls rail operating assets as the Government and Toll Rail were unable to reach agreement for the funding for marginal and loss making rail
    1 point
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