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Showing content with the highest reputation on 04/04/21 in all areas

  1. At long last, the Mail Train is almost finished! The marathon began back in November, with the loco largely complete by mid March - around 100 days and probably 180-200 hours construction time. Somewhat surprisingly, the coaches have only taken three weeks or so. Ok, one only needed a repaint, another was a kit, with just the PLM van being scratch built. There are still a few things to do, not least that Wolf Dog awaits its name and numberplate. It also needs some more lead in the firebox/boiler, as it currently can't pull its train! However, fingers crossed, am fairly confident all will be we
    8 points
  2. Getting plastered at the Drowes River
    8 points
  3. Nice to see the CBSC tank earning its coal. Nice Beyer cab windows - can see something of a family likeness to the Welshpool and Llanfair locos here
    4 points
  4. This is wonderful. Model railways can be evocative in a number of ways - such as echoing the railway we know or can remember, and many of us choose to do that in our modelling. What you are doing is another dimension entirely - bringing to life and colour a world that no one can now remember. This is just glorious - the railway that Yeats, Wilde, Pearse, Carson and Synge knew.
    3 points
  5. Must be going to wexford show
    3 points
  6. Having spent some time modelling in N gauge, I managed to build a nice simply layout for my grandson that allows him to run locos and wagons around a loop with a siding. I was very cautious with my spending as N gauge is no cheaper than OO gauge. I was quite disappointed by the amount of cleaning N gauge requires, perhaps the dirt and grime gathers more in smaller scales but I found myself cleaning the track almost every time I wanted to run locos. Anyway, I intend to return to some sort of OO gauge modelling when time allows.
    2 points
  7. Used Cobalt point motor Tiebar Labels which are designed to make ballasting points a little easier and less risky to clog the tie bar . https://www.dccconcepts.com/product/cobalt-tiebar-labels-12-pack/ The idea is you just ballast to the edges of the label which is pre-ballast coloured and then dry ballast around the tie bar which should cause the ballast to stick to the sticky labels avoiding the risk of PVA mix gluing the point. These were easy to slide in under the points after track laying and are self adhesive with a hole for the point motor bar. Photo below shows thr
    2 points
  8. Another 300 negatives have arrived this week and I am busy scanning them while the plaster sets on Four Masters Bridge. They are of varying quality and interest but the following 3 are definitely on the 'retained' list. The narrow gauge loco is Cork & Muskerry No 1K on 15 June 1934, a rather poor neg but very interesting and I think a very handsome loco. The other 2 are Belfast & County Down Railway almost certainly pre WW11 . 2-4-0 No 6 a glass neg , location unknown. and 4-4-2t No 17 at Queens Quay sheds. The majority of the others are from 1959 , varying quality but a
    1 point
  9. The worst thing about the Giants Causeway Railway is that tin tram contraption that scares passengers away. Introduced by Dodgy Del the owner because it was cheaper that the steam locos that were flogged out in the last few years under the "new management!"
    1 point
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  12. Thank you everyone for the additional information. I can imagine boisterous excursionists heading straight for the side exit. As long as you could show your ticket on the way back to any platform staff checking, presumably everyone was content.
    1 point
  13. I asked another question and here’s his answer.....there was a side exit to pier past harbour masters office and I expect that the hordes went through that my own early memories do not recall being brought through front door. I seem to remember being brought in from the Commons which was and is a public area twixt old harbour and Millisle Road halt.
    1 point
  14. A montage of progress on Gort this past two years. Shortly after no 3 was recovering from heart surgery when WMRC pal Dave visited me in hospital with a card signed by club members and a nice get well soon gift. Little did I know then how long this might take and its not done yet, but on the home stretch now. Thanks for the kind and encouraging comments especially from those who've been so generous with advice, guidance and tips as I learned along the way. Best wishes everybody for a special and blessed Easter. It's a long way to tipperary but loving every step along the way.
    1 point
  15. I reckon you are right , it should be Ashtown Halt. All my negs of Ashtown were taken by Gerald T Robinson and he only made one visit to Ireland and recorded the name in his log as Ashdown. Thanks for pointing this out.
    1 point
  16. Hi I am just wondering if in the above text the name Ashdown is a typo and should it read Ashtown, as I have a memory as a very young child see a line of disused steam engines on a siding beside the level crossing at Ashtown.
    1 point
  17. Uploaded to Flickr today are Inspection Car No 2 at Kildare A22 at Waterford 1960 B107 Waterford 1960 One of my favourite JG Dewing shots CDRJC at Donegal Town Railcar 19 May 1959 Originally Posted in wrong topic -!
    1 point
  18. Love the lighting in the pit. Brings the scene to life, and highlights all of those little details that would probably be missed otherwise.
    1 point
  19. I wish I could get holidays like that
    1 point
  20. Quite proud of how these coal loads turned out! They are the Dapol ones that came with the unpainted wagons, sprayed with gunmetal grey to give a graphite sheen then blackwash to give some texture and matte areas. Super pleased that it captures the shiny yet dusty look of certain coal grades haha
    1 point
  21. Great pics, but with the two wagons added in the train would only be 20 wagons.. Likely two of the wagons that arrived from Ballina were "red-cards" and needed to be brought back empty to NW for maintenance or an exam.. The Max in Ocean Pier is about 22 wagons, otherwise the train would block access to some facilities in the port(green building in the background)
    1 point
  22. Well they never said it was confidential! So lines they were looking for photos were Dundalk, Newry & Greenore, Lough Swilly, Achill-Westport, Giants Causeway & West Clare plus the Dungarvan one. I have this one, not yet uploaded to Flickr, on the Bandon to alleviate your suffering. A well photographed Special 17 March 1961
    1 point
  23. If only there was some reliable textbook on the subject of Rails to Achill...
    1 point
  24. Progress at Four Masters. Building up the embankments etc
    1 point
  25. A couple of JG Dewing images added to Flickr today. These 2 of D4 346 near Rathdrum date according to his records from the same day 20 April 1955
    1 point
  26. 126+132 work the Lakeview freight yard-Sligo liner train through Tara junction station.
    1 point
  27. A bumper bundle of Irish narrow gauge uploaded to flickr; 71 Londonderry & Lough Swilly and 7 colour slides West Clare Diesels and railcars. I thought there had been a colour shift on some West Clare slides but there does appear to have been 2 shades of green as both appear in some of the views.
    1 point
  28. 14:20 Limerick to Westport afternoon working, having arrived from Ennis, next stop Athenry collecting 2 coaches from Galway before heading up to Claremorris. Meanwhile there's activity in the goods yard, but the cattle escaped and are being chased across the fields by shunters and the signal man. The western sun is setting. Laminate plus a single craven without a HLV as its a seasonal summer working. As the evening light subsides a moody looking CIE Laminate awaits the starter signal. Families on board from Limerick excited about holiday trip to Mayo's beeche
    1 point
  29. It's a funny turn around with the GN open wagon in Cork and the No90 loco now in Downpatrick.
    1 point
  30. New arrivals from Silver Fox this morning, a CIE open third and corridor composite. They will provide much needed variety in the passenger fleet and it will now be possible to run two passenger trains on the layout with no two vehicles alike which was so typical of CIE in the sixties and early seventies.
    1 point
  31. Beet season is in full swing on the South Waterford Line.
    1 point
  32. The cork Waterford through goods crosses the local shunting at Glen More.
    1 point
  33. I have not been able to spend time on the layout following foot surgery which unfortunately did not go as planned. Following my new podiatrists orders I am spending my days on the sofa with my foot elevated. A bright spot today was the arrival of a couple of 121's. I couldn't resist posing one on the layout and taking a few photos.
    1 point
  34. First effort to make a load for the back to backs. The IRM loads are too large for my wagons and in any case it would be expensive to load even a few of them. The load is made from modeling clay around a foam core. Now that I have figured out how to make them this one will be replaced with a neater one. The camera is cruel magnifing every flaw.
    1 point
  35. The three new back to backs have been painted. On one the flat wagon was painted grey since many of the prototypes were still in this colour into the seventies. While working on this project I watched videos of trains on the Cork city railway and couldn't resist posing them with a bitumen tank to represent a typical transfer run between Kent station and Albert Quay in the late sixties and early seventies.
    1 point
  36. The three back to backs are finally assembled and will be allowed time for the polystyrene cement to cure before washing and painting. I would love to see more photos of the prototypes but unfortunately they seem extremely camera shy. Does anybody know when they were introduced and finally withdrawn?
    1 point
  37. The three back to back fertilizer wagons are well along. I seem to remember the prototypes running in blocks and a block of four will look good in a train.
    1 point
  38. Cork goods crosses the Waterford passenger in Glen More. 20201024_151733.mp4
    1 point
  39. Waterford Cork Bell liner passes Glen More Ovtober 1974.
    1 point
  40. Having completed the major scenic work and cleaned up the layout area it's a good time for a video showing how the layout fits into the available space. Our condo is split level, the stairs in the video comes down from the upper floor which is at ground level. This area has no windows, being a partial basement and the temperature remains constant throughout the year making it a perfect environment for a model railway. The area was originally intended as a storage room but the original owner had the builder omit the door and wall, finish the space, installed numerous electrical outlets and cabl
    1 point
  41. The ground cover is Woodland Scenics light green coarse turf scattered over wet tan paint. Further applications roof turf is added as needed to cover bare spots or build up texture. The bushes are Woodland scenics light green Clump Foliage. While it is often recommended to mix different color scatter materials I found it did not work for me at least on this layout. While running a few trains this morning I caught the Cork passenger behind 141 at Grange.
    1 point
  42. Once the Waterford passenger train left Glen More the beet train completed its shunting and began its return journey shunting Kielys cross on the way. There is no work at Grange so the train rolls straight into the Cork fiddle yard ending the operating session.
    1 point
  43. As the beet special shunts Glen More the passenger train from Cork to Waterford runs through.
    1 point
  44. The goods proceeds through Kielys Cross and Grange where there is no work today and on to the fiddle yard.
    1 point
  45. I have spent from before 10 this morning until 8 this evening writing lengthy captions for a selection of photos like this! Here’s how realistic this layout is; I open this post, see the first picture and without thinking, my mind starts saying: ”OK, what date, what loco, where’s he going, anything interesting among the wagons, what time did he leave Waterford, anything unusual?” ......then onto the keyboard and me eyes are cross-eyed as I type: ”On 3rd December 1986, Locomotive no. 142 approaches Glenmore with empty beet wagons for Wellington Bridge. Later that day
    1 point
  46. The beet special drops off an empty and picks up a load at Grange. It then proceeds to Glen More where it meets the Cork goods which waits in the loop after finishing its work there.
    1 point
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