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Showing content with the highest reputation on 16/04/21 in all areas

  1. Well that went well except I glued a LED wire under the Deck and a cross beam but that sorted now and the little Light rewired and the LED working under the Bow which will look nice on Sailing a dusk which I have never done! I then soldered up some White metal and Brass rod for the voice pipes for the Bridge and started on the Binnacle using some 9mm dowl and coffer sticks sanded smooth! Needs to be Paint next. The Bow plate was also glued down with PVA and Left to Dry and then the edges were filled in with P39 Car Filler and then sanded smooth, Well the front part anyhow. I need to adjust one of the tall air intake pipes and one seemed to of moved and has set slightly off which is a balls but thems the breaks! .
    6 points
  2. Well it does want it is supposed to do! Weight and balance test.
    5 points
  3. (Very much an unconventional post, I know, but this seems like the best place to put this as it’s still a form of modelling in my view) With the re-emergence of the Britbus Alexander (Belfast) RH Class-bodied Leyland Olympians, I’ve been inspired to finally throw myself in the deep end and construct a virtual “model” to accompany the almost inevitable purchase(s!) I will be making of the recent liveries on the RHs IRM are retailing. This doesn’t fit the standard definition of a model bus, but I have used modeller’s drawings to construct this from the ground up, so I think it still counts! I hope this is of interest to someone! (It’s still very much under construction)
    3 points
  4. To go back to the original topic, about RTR steam engines. As others mentioned, this conversation has sprung up here and there over the years, often morphing into "wish lists". From a commercial point of view, doing a model of a diesel or a CIE coach means (usually) a model which could have been seen anywhere from Cork to Dundalk, Rosslare to Sligo; and even Cavan, Monaghan and Dundalk, as well as the main line to Belfast - and all of this over a period of maybe 40 years. 141s and laminates even made it to Omagh and Derry. Fertiliser bogies were regulars in the NCC (Waterside) station, so would fit a layout based on the NCC main line. Killagan, 1980, anyone? Nice! But steam engines.... Many were only to be seen in one area. You can't do an accurate west of Ireland layout with GNR 4.4.0s or Bandon tanks. You can't do ANYWHERE but the main Cork line with 400s, 500s or 800s. The only diesel equivalent here is B101s, which rarely strayed off the GSWR lines. Even the most common steam loco, the J15, was absent from West Cork, as were all tender engines. The northern equivalent, the "WT" class "2.6.4T "Jeep", was rare away from the NCC, apart from residencies of a few of the class on the GNR in the late 60s; they even managed appearances on the "Derry Road", but only right at the end. Apart from RPSI outings, they were not known anywhere on the rest of the CIE system, and J15s never worked on the GNR, let alone the NCC, bar a bit of York Road shunting with RPSI-owned 186 about 1968! Just about any steam engine suffers from several things, in terms of its application to layouts: 1. In terms or realistic operation, lack of geographical variety. 2. Cost. With such small runs, very pricey per item and way beyond the means of some modellers. 3. Less interest, especially amongst modellers too young to remember steam working. Even an oul fossil like me has more memories of steam in Indonesia, Austria, the Czech Republic, Germany, Luxembourg, South Africa and India - than Ireland. 4. In commercial terms, as the IRM Brigade will, I am sure, agree - a very tiny proportion of an already tiny market. In an ideal world, a Donegal Class 5A 2.6.4T would win hands-down as a RTR model for 12mm gauge - but how many would pay perhaps €300 / €350 a pop, and buy three? Nothing remotely close to any sort of viable market. We are all aware of the two steam lists - (a) our personal "wish lists", and (b) what we know would be the most popular, whether they were our own favourites or not. From a commercial point of view, that translates to "least unpopular". I think that the 00 Works model, with small batches of RTR, is the best way; a few collectors items like, say, a RTR "800" class, should become highly sought-after collector's items, if such a thing appeared - maybe a GN "S" class too, who knows. A UTA "Jeep" would be a winner, without doubt, in the north - if that place was a great deal bigger (or more densely populated with railway enthusiasts - but who in Cork or Limerick might buy one? I am certain that a well-chosen, limited edition run of RTR steam is a good idea, and I don't want to yet again open a vast debate aboput which it should be, but manufacturers will tread warily and sensibly, i am sure.
    3 points
  5. Cant beat the smell of the older Hornby Motors...mmmmmm. Now thats one for Lynx to do.
    3 points
  6. Hi Gents, Watched the first 30mins of this earlier, some fab shots, note the A class and the Cements trains with brakes on each end!
    2 points
  7. Hi guys, I know I’ve said this before but, this has got to be the end of model railways....! See for your selfs, BTB https://www.ebay.ie/itm/HORNBY-R768-CIE-CLASS-35-HYMEK-DIESEL-LOCO-ORANGE-BLACK-IRISH-LIVERY-V-G-C/384062532687?hash=item596be92c4f:g:VUYAAOSwmX5gXbZu OK I’V sorted the name out, it’s a Class 35 otherwise known as a HYMEK...
    2 points
  8. I think No 30’s BCDR livery was applied at York Road in the 60s. The loco had a lucky escape into preservation at all, at one point being hidden in Cookstown Junction shed by the UTA CME when the price of copper went up! She was recovered when the precious metals market was trading at less exalted levels. Funnily enough the York Road painters got no 74 turned out perfectly in NCC colours!! In fairness, some early preservationists were so exuberant at having saved locos from scrap that ‘accurate’ liveries took less priority than they would today.. The Keighley and Worth Valley is now seen as the epitome of 50s LM region authenticity. Fifty years ago it was operated as the ‘Worth Valley’ railway with its own livery to match....-and the less said about the Caledonian Fairburn the better, although GN men might think it a WT improved !!!
    2 points
  9. Well.... OK, first, as a one-time preservationist, I am well aware of the outrage when anyone dares to even comment on colours of things, so I do not want to stoke that; I've been there, got the T shirt, having once painted a coach at Whitehead in a gaudy purply red, as the paint supplier made a mess of the order......... so, for any active preservationists, please take my comments as factual. In Cultra, everything is correct except: 1. Maedb. She's in CIE Inchicore-painted green, not GSR green as sometimes mistakenly assumed, but has GSR markings which were not put there until she arrived in Cultra. As a GS loco, she'd a have a different green, and yellow and black lining, not white and black, which was pure CIE. 2. BCDR No. 30. The green is light years too light, makes her look like an Isle of Man engine. BCDR green was very dark indeed, and if this wretched covid thing EVER ends, can be seen in the Malahide museum on two models. 3. CDRJC open wagon. This is in actual original Donegal paint, but seems to have acquired black strapping in preservation. That's not accurate. I can't fathom why the preservation movement is obsessed with painting ironwork and corner strapping on wagons black, as it never was on almost all wagon types. 4. CIE Goods Brake Van. Black and white stripes on the lookout ducket. Should be yellow and black. The CIE "roundel" and numerals aren't quite right either, but to fair, that latter is serious nit-picking! 5. Cavan & Leitrim and Castlederg coaches. The lettering on these is completely wrong. Self-adhesive "Arial" plastic lettering? The maroon appears to be correct, or certainly close enough, but the lettering would have been shaded yellow or gold leaf. Again, just for the record, but nit-picking! 6. Hunslet diesel 102. Again, very minor detail - there should be white lining around the ends yellow patches. It's been given a truly superb paint finish, it has to be said. I suspect that it's the way it is simply due to short time - it hasn't got its numbers and NIR logos last time I saw it. These were gold with white lining. 7. GSWR Explosives van. I'm not 100% on this, but last time I saw it, it occurred to me that the lettering wasn't quite right - not sure why! That's all I can remember... but again, I state the above as a matter of record for those interested. Many won't be! There was certainly a trial run to Limerick with one, though I do not recall the full details. lndeed it would - even though they didn't even run as a rake behind 800! Senior recalled them at one stage having "Great Southern Pullman" in gold letters above window level, but I've never seen a pic showing that - propably only on one, and short-lived.
    2 points
  10. One can see that they were the "matchstick" variant. I believe there was usually only one in a train, at least by CIE days. Theres a photo of 102 withdrawn in a siding at Naas in 1959 in Irish Railways in Colour, still in the older dark green and eu de nil livery, which may be what you are referring to. JB would probably know if any of the three got as far as the light green, I'd doubt it myself. Good thread on them here
    2 points
  11. Looks like remnants of the blue livery with some brown patch-painting to me? CIE/IR weren't as fussy about maintaining the exteriors of these wagons back then, and the ore took its toll on the paintwork so at that point the majority may have been bare metal with quite a bit of road dirt, ore dust and general grime. The corrosive nature of the ore is also the reason why the lids have been replaced over time... Also of interest - this wagon has had a set of shale/cement wagon bogies fitted instead of the regular Y33s. Wonder if it was a test or if they were fitted while its regular set received attention?
    2 points
  12. Well guys where does that leave me with these two, . . BTB
    2 points
  13. So the blue Tara's with their G1 lids will be essential for those modelling the early to mid nineties!
    2 points
  14. If I recall correctly, the change in colour occurred around the turn of the millennium and the 'second gen' lids were added around the same time. A third type of lid is gradually replacing that type (and has been for at least the past five years) as they wear out. It's the second lid style that's present on the IRM Tara wagons. The last B&T locos received the Supertrain livery around 1975 so unfortunately none were around to power Tara traffic in its early days.
    2 points
  15. Thank you for that GSR 800. I have struggled to satisfy myself as to why the Woolwich Mogul in pristine CIE green livery that runs on my 1960's layout was in fact the first Irish steam locomotive to be 'preserved'! Of course, easy access to spares from SR 'U' class... Saved by CIE, they of course donated to the RPSI in 1965!!!
    2 points
  16. After months of working on locos and rolling stock, attention now turns to the signalling department. Belmullet currently only has the Arigna Town, three arm signal which was modelled on that one on the Sligo Leitrim that controlled three level crossings. Here, it covers arrivals to each side of the loop and also acts as an advanced starter. However, both the main platform and bay need departure signals, while the single slip ought to have at least a couple of ground signals, so these are forming the next projects. An order to Wizard Models quickly secured enough etched and cast parts to supplant what I had left over from the SLNCR signal construction, in the form of a set of Saxby and Farmer arms, a couple of cast posts and a couple of ground signal kits. The latter are actually GNR/LNER versions, but look very similar to the County Donegal ground signal from Alphagraphix. They are actually MSE kits and can be made to work. Was hoping to connect them to the blades of the single slip, so as these moved, they would make the discs turn. Unfortunately, the blades only move a couple of mm, but the signals should turn 90 or even 180 degrees, so quite how this can be made to happen, I currently have no idea! Anyway, the kits themselves are simple enough once you've read the instructions a few times & have been placed in what I hope are appropriate positions. The discs can be turned by hand for photographic purposes. Elsewhere, while I had black and white acrylic paint out, the Irish Shell tank wagon has had the bare metal on the strapping touched in, while the undergrowth on the front edge of the baseboards has been significantly embellished with a mixture of postiche, coarse and fine crumb to represent weeds, dog roses and the like - though I'd still like to add some nettles eventually too. The photos show the existing signal, plus the new ground signals and a sketch of what the starters should eventually look like, plus the new ground cover and Irish Shell tank.
    2 points
  17. City of Turo in black although not in any way realistic is still a beautiful livery [even if it was only painted on one side] at the end of the day the owner makes the decision what paint goes on his or hers engine.
    1 point
  18. They did. The late, great Harold Houston had a part in ensuring that BOTH 30 and 74 were preserved. jhbSenior and he were great friends, from when Senior worked on the NCC in the 1940s. Upon asking Harold one time, when he visited him after retirement in Whitehead, why 30 was that colour instead of the extremely dark green (the "green" equivalent of "navy" blue, I suppose), Harold's honest answer was "I don't know!" The GNR tank in there is also correct, and some CDR items are in actual CDR paint. The Dargan Saloon has been repainted; the colour is more than close enough though. I think it had been grey in its later CIE ownership, but I'd have to check. The C & L locomotive is OK - the company had engines in two shades of green and also one in black when the GSR took over and dropped them all into a pint glass filled with grey paint! The Derry shunter, No. 1, is still in its original paintwork, and I think the DNGR coach may also be. The GNR railbus was repainted, as it was fully rebuilt; the paint scheme appears to be accurate enough - AND - it's in FULL working order! An interesting thing about this is that when it was restored in the mid 1990s, the then RPSI policy was to have accurate liveries on everything, and coaches 9 (K15) and 114 were painted also in GNR blue and cream. As treasurer, it fell to me to pay the bills; the supplier we used was Jamison & Green in Belfast. Long before things like RAL codes were ever heard of, this company had a man who was about to retire, and had mixed paints for the company all his life. This company hed previously supplied dark blue and cream paint to the GNR itself, and this oul boy had the mix in his head, and written down somewhere; both colours, plus UTA green, were STILL on their books. I passed this info on to UFTM, one of whose leading lights was also on the RPSI Council at the time, so we could be sure that this railbus got the right colour. If anyone in the preservation world is reading this, it might be worth investigating (for future reference) if this company still hold these records. I believe the man who knew was called George something, but I digress.... The CDR "Phoenix" is repainted, and accurate apart from the lettering which should be pale yellow, not white. The Donegal tank engine is a mess. What may well be original cab and side tank paint, but the boiler and dome painted black. While many looked like this in use, they were actually painted red! Sadly, this has been perpetrated with another restored CDR tank up in Donegal - black dome is wrong. Looks like a pimple on its face...... Mind you, red is a most impractical colour for a working steam loco - GNR blue locos also ended up with black-looking domes, which were blue! Enough - time for my tea. Relax, everyone; that's tonight's boring post done with........! Just to show I'm not totally fixated, I actually like BOTH of those - even the blue tank engine. But I am also almost the only person on the planet who actually liked the 1980s "Desert Sand" Dublin bus livery, which has been described as the "vomit" livery by some..... (so what would I know, with taste like that!).
    1 point
  19. Made it as far as Limerick too no? Cultra has definitely made some bizarre decisions on livery, slapping G S on Maedbh after CIE had just repainted her in the Dark CIE green is just one!
    1 point
  20. I think they ran to Limerick at one point, possibly when first in service, I'm sure I've seen a flier with timings somewhere. I did also read a very short piece in a society publication about the GSR cars which said they later ran to Sligo(!?). I've never come across that anywhere else though, the same publication stated that the underframe of one survived on a vehicle in departmental use until ~1981.
    1 point
  21. The lower picture is the correct livery; upper one not, by the way. (Just in case anyone is modelling a BNCR or MR (NCC) locomotive. While "Midland red" was the way of things in Brexitland, the ex-BNCR retained the dark green, until LMS NCC days. Correct. There was never a full train of them. One each on the up and won day mails to / from Cork and Galway. They were never used elsewhere, expect perhaps as a one-off of some sort long after they were no longer pullmans. And yes, they ended their days in the dark green, but with lining as above.
    1 point
  22. You can stop taking the medicine, it's Sir Henry lurking in the background. However, there are problems with the space-time continuum, as it is actually sitting fifty years on the future!
    1 point
  23. It wouldn't be viable to supply lids by themselves, I'm afraid.
    1 point
  24. Probably use footage of a BR Class 252!
    1 point
  25. I suppose 100% of the 3’ NCC Portstewart Tramway loco stock survives . I do agree though - one of the huge LLSR tanks would be nice - as would one of the classic little NCC 2-4-2Ts.
    1 point
  26. Are these not a bauxite colour under that dirt? (1993)
    1 point
  27. What about the LLSR or the NCC Narrow Gauge?
    1 point
  28. I'm hoping that they release "Blue Diesel Smoke" first.
    1 point
  29. The GSR 820 Class 4-6-2T proposal with its medium power output larger bunker capacity seems ideal for the RPSIs profitable short haul work, otherwise a second WT would be a no-brainer. Going back to the original question the contemporary absence of a readily available rtr chassis like the Triang/Triang 0-6-0, 4-4-0 and B12 4-6-0 chassis is probably the greatest barrier to producing a OO gauge body-line kit for an Irish Steam loco. Most of the whitemetal steam locomotive kits produced by Bec, Gem and Wills were originally designed to fit contemporary Triang and Hornby classis. GEM and Wills began producing chassis for locos when no suitable rtr chassis was available. Wills re-tooled many of their kits including more accurate brass chassis in response to changing modeller expectations around detail and accuracy following the developed of etched and composite kits in the 80s. While the Bachmann Jinty, 3F and 4F were fairly close in wheelbase to the large GSWR J4 and J9 0-6-0 Classes obtaining a loco or chassis may be challenging as Bachmann appear to have discontinued the models, though the Bachmann LNER J72 appears similar in size to the ex-MGWR J26 tank locos but how many modellers would be prepared to pay over £100 for a donor loco/chassis plus up to £70-80 for an unpainted 3d printed body.
    1 point
  30. You're stretching it there! In immediate pre-steam days, most of what ran in Wisht Caark was actually not of CBSCR parentage, anyway, so 90 is as good as it gets, indeed. My understanding is that the DCDR will in time return it to working on public trains there. Towards the end of the CBCS system, about the only thing which REGULARLY ran on it which owed its origin to anything other than the MGWR, CIE or GSWR, was the old brake van off the Courtmac branch, T&CR No. 5 (GSR / CIE 5J)........... ........which makes one wonder why on earth the RPSI is building a new-build tender engine instead of a second "Jeep"! Soon, the nearest turntable to Waterford, Cork, Tralee, Galway, Westport, Ballina and Sligo will be in Dublin!
    1 point
  31. The latest update to the April gallery. Wednesday 14th April 2021: A few images from around the Killarney area, including Quagmire Viaduct of the 3ICR sets on the Mallow - Tralee services. Click the image below to view all the pictures. [url=https://thewandererphotos.smugmug.com/2021-Photos/April-2021/i-4FfCRPb/A][img]https://photos.smugmug.com/2021-Photos/April-2021/i-4FfCRPb/0/7dc569c3/S/DJI_0053-S.jpg[/img][/url]
    1 point
  32. Thanks Brack & especially for taking time to do the drawing. Must admit I had to look up what a Geneva wheel was/did, but what a clever thing it is! The photo shows my Megapoints control panel. If I'm honest, the system requires more logical thinking than I possess, but is certainly very effective & clever in the right hands. Indeed, though I thought I'd worked out what I needed, I didn't get the specification quite right and now realise that the separate starter for the harbour branch was probably better as a ground signal on the single slip. Meanwhile, I don't have enough ports left in the control panel to add extra switches for the ground signals. I could fit 'Y' connectors so the push buttons for the slip points also operated new servos for the ground signals, but the panel processors control the amount of movement of each servo, so the extra required would only be possible via a lever/bell crank, so it is easier to try and do it straight off the point blades. Unfortunately, the ground signals need to rotate 90 degrees, so I'll need to do some experimenting to see if that is possible. For now, they will have to remain cosmetic.
    1 point
  33. Another thing is 21mm conversion. A small few of our number use 21mm gauge. It’s easier to re-gauge a diesel than most steam! Imagine the work in re-gauging a 400 or an 800.....
    1 point
  34. So after posting the photo of the sign post without the sign I've been making a new one to try and reduce the list of jobs that need doing as there is a provisional exhibition invite for 2022. A few mins with some scrap etch and a bit of spare rail and it now just needs a coat of paint and planting on the layout.
    1 point
  35. Yes, I must say it’s unusual to see Irish people getting so excited about flags!
    1 point
  36. Be proud of your outpost in the middle of the Atlantic!
    1 point
  37. Indeed there could and should be no compulsion to divulge ones physical location, but it would be cool for members to see who else is in their area if they do decide to divulge it. When I joined the S4 society I was surprised to get a list of "people near me". Two chaps in Berlin. I have found and visited a very nice gentleman and talented modeller (who is a non-posting member here) on a German language forum for British and Irish prototype railfans and modellers. He only lives about 30 minutes drive from me. When the pandemic is over I'm sure we'll see more of each other. I'm in Brieselang, near Berlin. The Berlin-Hamburg mainline passes through here but it's not all that interesting. Mostly regional passenger multiple units, some regional push pulls, ICE trains and a bit of freight (mostly containers, the odd heavy coal train with double heading locos). Almost all electric. Very rare to see a diesel.
    1 point
  38. Well, there's Georgia, Ohio and Chicago above. A school friend of mine (fifty years ago!) lives in Tennessee, but he's more of a live steam man. He has a beautiful British Railways "Brittannia", 5 ins gauge, live steam. Approaching retirement now, he's starting in H0, so he may well turn up here at some stage....... He, in turn, is in touch with another mutual school colleague who lives in Texas, but he's not a railway enthusiast! I'm sure I'm not the only one who sometimes jumps to assume that more of us are based in Ireland than we actually are...
    1 point
  39. I suppose I am the most distant from Ireland in Hamilton, New Zealand another rail center with approx. 30 freight trains daily the junction between The Auckland-Wellington North Island Main Trunk Line & the East Coast Main Trunk to Tauranga and Kawerau. We live in Claudelands a 1920s suburb on the opposite side of the Waikato River to the CBD Trains are a bit shorter than the States at 30-40 bogie wagons and several level crossings in the suburbs/industrial areas.
    1 point
  40. I'm in Madison Ohio, 40 miles East of Cleveland. CSX's former New York Central double track New York Chicago main line and Norfolk Southern's single track ex Nickel Plate Chicago Buffalo line both run through town. Both very busy railroads.
    1 point
  41. I'm in Marietta GA (Atlanta)
    1 point
  42. So, an update, with background. I moved house last autumn. Lurking in a well-known premises in Edenderry was "Dugort Harbour", a small terminus in a setting of both scenic and operational similarity to the likes of Baltimore, Valentia Harbour or Westport Quay. Space was limited to about 11ft x 3ft max, at the end of a room. The train would leave, vanish into a tunnel and appear in a small fiddle yard. Trains would be short one or two coach things, or a short Loughrea or Foynes type mixed. So, delivery from Edenderry was paused, pending the new house, with the probability that once in, it would be installed in one of the bedrooms. Enter, stage left, PJ the loft conversion man. Long story short, there's now an attic room which I posted a vidjo of the other day. This is a much bigger room, with planning permission from the Domestic Authority for a full possession of it. I attach below a very rough sketch; the longest wall is 19ft, and the other two 14ft each. I know, I know, metrication.... bear in mind, O Younger Folk, that I went to school in the north, where distances are still measured in quarts, and time is measured in perches and roods; AND it was almost sixty years ago, when blue steam engines..... enough! I've heard comments before about how house moves interfere with layouts to the extent that a perfect one for one house simply will not satisfactorily fit into a new one; now I have that issue. Had Dugort Harbour not been started, I would now have it an entirely different shape, but it is what it is, so I have had to arrange the way the attic room will be with its current state in mind. Luckily that's do-able, so once it is delivered I'll show pics to illustrate what I mean. So, the plan now is to extend it. Due to initial space constraints it was designed with a run-round loop which could barely hold four bogie coaches and a van, although a local train rarely reached that length anyway, so all good there. Thus, in extending it, there's no point in any other station being much longer, as a train despatched from there to Dugort would not not fit in the platform. I wanted to apply a broad principle that "less is more". Artistically, we've seen the superb results achieved by some of the layouts that feature here regularly which are set in rural locations. What makes these look so realistic is as much - if not more - the wide embankments, hedgerows and sparse "clutter" (as opposed to the necessity of this in an urban setting) - as the accuracy of locos and appropriate rolling stock. I want to show a rural setting of the mid-50s to late 60s period, with enough steam engines to operate the entire thing with steam only, and realistically. Thus, I do have enough steam engines to operate the whole thing, but also for a later period, A & C class diesels, finally 121 and 141 types. Anything later I'm not interested in personally. Carriages similarly; from a few old wooden bogies (and six wheelers eventually), and some laminates and Park Royals and appropriate vans - the point being that the whole layout can be operated as if it's 1956, 1963, 1966, whatever. Such a terminus will have looked very shabby indeed, the sort of place where if you turned up there you'd be compelled to wonder how long more before CIE would close it. This, of course, makes one scenic item simpler; it's easier to put weeds on a platform than convincing-looking people! Looking at the plan below, you can see that the train will leave Dugort and head round a sharp curve - this is necessary due to the shape of the room and is just over 2'6" radius - sharper than I'd like, but it'll have to do. Childhood layouts were 6' x 4', thus a curve of under 24" radius. It then travels along a nine-inch-wide "shelf" along the wall, which will be in open countryside, before rounding a curve at the left-hand bottom corner of the drawing, into a somewhat busier "Castletown West". This is suppose to be a bit like Skibbereen or Cahirciveen. It's a terminus in a way, but the Dugort bit was a Balfour extension in the 1890s, aimed at traffic which never materialised. Now it's a bit of a backwater. The purpose of this is for variety in operation. Moving on to the fiddle yard at the top right, which is meant to represent the "Big Shmoke" (Cork or Dublin), a main line train leaves there, heads to Castletown, which is somewhat inspired by Westport, or Newcastle West, or the two south-west destinations above. When it arrives, a branch train takes over and toddles off down somewhat indifferent track to Dugort, which might have been about four miles away. This will allow a Woolwich to arrive at Castletown in the steam era, and a dirty J15 takes over for the branch train. However the goods will work straight through - two more dirty J15s (I've three). In diesel days, a similar working pattern with an A on the main line passenger, a C on the branch, and 121 / 141 types gradually taking the passenger over and displacing the A to the goods. So we have operational variation, but not too much clutter; the whole thing will look rural. I will keep posts updated as it develops, if anyone's interested. It's going to be a challenge, as it's years since I've done anything this big. Some I'm doping myself, but I've had to "sub-contract" other stuff. I haven't mentioned the red lines on the diagram, nor the green rectangle yet. The fiddle yard has these red tracks too. They are 12mm gauge, of H0 scale 3'6". This will enable me to develop a small adjacent layout to indulge my interest in South African and Indonesian steam. Not a diesel will sully these tracks. When Dugort Harbour was ORIGINALLY planned, the intention was that it would be portable. Long story, but as you can see this isn't happening. A chance conversation with a fellow enthusiast of Cape gauge stuff recently got me thinking, so this green rectangle is a portable board of 15" x 7'6" (in quarts) which rests on supports but may be lifted out when I'm operating the Irish layout. It shares the (fixed) fiddle yard, and I am talking to "those who know" about a dual gauge turntable in the fiddle yard. This will represent a Western Cape branchline somewhere on the edge of the Karoo, in the 1960s - 70s period. The beauty of South African lines is that many branchlines, even those which saw but one mixed train a day, lasted right until closure as late as the mid 1990s without ever having seen a diesel; so, perfect for steam fans even into the modern era with 2.8.4s hauling goods trains with modern bogie container wagons - same stuff you'd have seen at North Wall in 1995. This one WILL just be a terminus-and-fiddle-yard thing. What's with all those turntables? Steam engines and 121s, that's what. In the era I'm dealing with, 121s rarely if ever ran in pairs, and on most branches, CIE turned steam engines. On the South African Railways, while it did happen the odd time, tender-first working on lines like the one shown were almost unknown. The narrow gauge thing will be limited to maybe 15 items of rolling stock - a typical train of the appropriate type might have had two four wheel wagons, two bogies and one coach. Locos will be two 6J class 4.6.0s, and IF the IRM "A" class budget doesn't have the damn house back on the market, maybe a 19D. Lottery win needed, maybe another 6th class derivitave of the 6J kit. If anyone has any idea where I could get a 24 class....do ping me.
    1 point
  43. Echo the comment above by Rich. I've always liked the look of a 141/181 double heading with the 121. Great stuff as always from the Junction.
    1 point
  44. Excellent Noel, again. A 141 and 121 double headed does it for me Rich,
    1 point
  45. Classic stuff. Looks really well against that scenic backdrop.
    1 point
  46. Dont ever forget MTK'S A Class kit, Q Kits one & MIR's white metal & Resin kits All very acceptable for their time.
    1 point
  47. Broithe Thanks I can wait. Jhb Some pics. I do have a pic of the original coach so the first two are the side and the end. i had to lighten the end to make it clearer. The next two are the work I have completed todate. Both these photos have been lightened for clarity but in doing so the roof colour has become grey which it is not in reality. Sometime ago I did make an attempt to change the end, to block out the small upper window, but this was not a success given the size of the end in N gauge. So i will just leave any other changes for now. I have painted the chassis brown again this was done sometime ago
    1 point
  48. jhb I will post some pics of work todate. I do not think I have any pics of the coaches in their totally original condition. The end windows are different to those shown in Desmond Coakham's book but I will leave them as they are for the moment because I am not sure I could get the right look in N gauge. I will include pics of the ends.Again i do not know about the gang ways. Brothie I was not aware of the article by Colm Flannigan. Would it be possible to get a copy post on this forum. StevieB To some extent yes although I thought that the issues I am now raising were not covered.
    1 point
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