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Showing content with the highest reputation on 20/05/21 in all areas

  1. Finally got around to doing some work on this layout. Many other projects, including 305mm scale have kept me busy. Got some paint onto the mineral wagons, which still need to be weathered. A little bit of gardening and weatering on the model has helped to tone it down & plant it in the secene. Still some more to do, but it's all part of the process. It should be on display in Bray on Sunday for those who can get about. Ken
    13 points
  2. Love the bird shite on the cills Eoin
    5 points
  3. Last Saturday, I had the opportunity to visit the fledging Commemara Railway in Maam Cross in Co.Galway. At the moment a "popup" narrow gauge railway has been laid on the site to showcase what is to come. Plans are in place to replace this with 5ft 3in track later this year or in 2022. Click https://bit.ly/2SXuRlU to view. [url=https://thewandererphotos.smugmug.com/RailtoursPreservedRailways/2021/Connemara-Railway/n-7DSpXD/i-8ppHLNb/A][img]https://photos.smugmug.com/photos/i-8ppHLNb/0/6f89f520/S/i-8ppHLNb-S.jpg[/img][/url]
    3 points
  4. At the bottom of this image, from Headhunters Railway Museum in Enniskillen, you see actual NCC lettering on actual NCC maroon paint. So that's the carriage colour, and that's the lettering style and colour. Often, the gold got faded to a wishy-washy creamy colour, and at the same time the shading was worn off. The NCC tended not to put lining on much secondary stock, narrow gauge included, and often no LMS crest either. Certainly in later years, the Ballycastle stock had neither lining nor crests. The above collection is worth looking at - many of the board backgrounds are in actual railway company paint, including the Dublin & Blessington; almost without doubt the only surviving example of their colour of green. Ditto the BCDR, UTA, Clogher Valley and T & DR (the huge garter on the left above the Donegal one). Gavin, regarding the lettering of the gangway COVERS, this looks to me as if it was handpainted on; thus pale yellow.
    3 points
  5. I recorded this video just for @jhb171achill, as I know he's a rabid fan of twenty minute unboxing videos:
    3 points
  6. Well Bulleid was over here...Light Pacifics instead of Turf Burners?
    2 points
  7. A “silver” laminate, a short-lived idea in the late 60s. And THIS is a cleanish one. The entire chassis, ends and roof are caked in a mix of general grime, brake dust and drizzle, and the only reason the sides aren’t is carriage washes. The odd one survived like this until about 1965, going directly to black’n’tan. Most were repainted green after a short time.
    2 points
  8. We live in an eastern Hamilton suburb about half a mile from a railway line with about 30 freight movements daily with several at night. Most noticeable thing is the low rumbling of long eastbound freight trains that can be heard for several minutes before passing through our suburb. The city is in a wide river valley basin with a distant range of hills on the western side, so sound travels a long distance in calm conditions. Until fairly recently we had a nice mix of loco sounds with the deep rumbling of American General Electric locos with 4 stroke engines contrasting with Turbo and non Turbo 2 stroke General Motors sound now largely replaced with Chinese built DL Locos with their screeching high revving MTU (Maybach) power units. The General Electrics were upgrades of the 2700 hp U26C model dating from the early 70s two of which were rebuilt to C30-8m specification with reconditioned 3250hp power units sourced from GE. The C-30-8m rebuilds had a distinctively different sound to the 2700 hp locos and the two members of the sub class were rostered to the Metro Port container trains that pass through our neighbourhood until transferred to the South Island following the introduction of the DLs. Going back to Ireland, I once spent a week in a Fawlty Towers style seaside hotel in Bray while attending a training course during the early 80s, whatever else it was an excellent place to stay and listen to 001 Class climbing the grade from the station to Bray head with empty fertiliser and laden Ammonia trains to the Shelton Abbey NET plant. On average there appeared to be three South and a similar number of North bound movements most nights, at the time a lightly loaded Wexford Liner operated during daylight hours usually a half dozen 4w container wagons attached to the rear of a Fertiliser Train between North Wall and Shelton Abbey.
    2 points
  9. Nocturnal meanderings..... LONGFORD, Summer 1974. Down Direction 0016 Down Night mail from Mullingar (Connection from down Galway night mail) 0121 North Wall - Sligo goods (loose coupled) (Tuesday to Saturday) 0305 Mullingar - Sligo goods (Monday to Friday) 0635 Mullingar - Longford local goods (Tuesday to Friday; stopped only at Mostrim). 1107 Down day mail / Passenger Up Direction 2211 Sligo - Mullingar goods (Monday - Friday) 2232 Sligo - Mullingar Mail (usually had an old Bredin brake on it for nominal passenger accommodation; I travelled in it once). 0020 Sligo - Dublin Empty Fertiliser path. (Opposite direction was during daytime) 0312 Sligo - dublin goods (Tuesday - Saturday) 0750 Longford - Mullingar light engine 0910 Sligo - Dublin passenger My own early "sounds" were loco horns heard at Westland Row / Lansdowne Road, and GNR steam whistles at Knockmore Junction.......
    2 points
  10. Latest updates at the mill - boiler house and chimney added, more scenics, and an anti-aircraft position, which was provided following a token raid by a lone German bomber in 1941........
    2 points
  11. A big thank you to IRM for taking on this project, and thanks to everyone for the support and interest. I'm really looking forward to seeing the finished product, it will be worth the wait!
    2 points
  12. Hi everyone, There has been some silence on this project and I must admit that's down to IRM, and not Robert, so apologies to both Robert and all of you who are interested in this footbridge for that. We were so impressed with Robert's design and attention to detail that we approached him with a view to mass produce his footbridge design rather than do a small run 3D print, which he has very graciously agreed to. So, this will be a new scenic accessory from IRM! What's more, we are working on a modular concept for the bridge, allowing for various spans and orientations, giving you greater flexibility to fit in on your layout! The plan is that it will fully painted and with the bare minimum for assembly. We are currently working with our factory to get this production ready, and we will have a full update and launch including specs, prices, ordering information and more later this year, so please bare with us on that. We will have more details in due course, but with the design being so good and now with a factory fit and finish, it promises to be a must have for any Irish layout! Cheers! Fran
    2 points
  13. Bloody shite-hawks - they get everywhere!!
    1 point
  14. Love micros - this is superb!!!
    1 point
  15. These were working items, Gavin, which could get chucked around a bit, rather than varnished coach work. I’d suspect they were lettered in cream or white
    1 point
  16. Nice one gents. I think that's the first photo I've seen of those 10 suburban compos before they got converted to brake standards.
    1 point
  17. 24.2.20. Irish GM 073 with the Irish Rail Sperry Train at various locations on the Navan to Drogheda branch.
    1 point
  18. Never even tested the sprung buffers....Tut tut!
    1 point
  19. Recognise a few bits there Dave
    1 point
  20. I've similar memories of lying in my bed at night as a kid in Longford and hearing the growl of a pair of Bo-Bo GMs or the low frequency wallop of an 071 either pottering about the local yard with a liner or powering through on the way to Sligo. Unforgettable...
    1 point
  21. Outstanding info, JHB. As Mayner says, it was always the cold, clear nights when the sound would travel best. The GM's sounded like they were just around the corner. Ah, the nostalgia.
    1 point
  22. There is no doubt that they are handsome engines, as rebuilt. That said, the originals, as the Blessed Oliver first built them were quite brilliant locos, but at quite a cost in fuel and maintainence. The slipping reputation has a lot to do with the fact that several starts were on curves (Waterloo, Bournemouth (going East) and Salisbury (also East), that plus the pull-out regulator meant they needed skilled handling. I must admit to a very personal interest in this one - 97mph at Winchfield in 1967. The smaller West Countries were fleet of foot also and quite remarkable hill-climbers - when you've done 75mph up 1 in 250 with eleven coaches, you know that they were Premiership material. Wonderful t see her out again.
    1 point
  23. STEAM IN THE SUN today! We are having a very wet and windy May here, but today, the sun came out and steam flew past on the FAST lines, to boot, at Goring. 35028 Clan Line aka Merchant 28, was out on the Belmonds (we've still got'em here) to Bristol, via the GWR Main line. Excuse Linda's enthusiasm, they didn't see steam engines of any description in the Irish village she was born in! MAQ03775.m4v The loco even made Page 2 of the UK's Daily Telegraph today.
    1 point
  24. A36 rattles and coughs along the main line somewhere with a mail train. Reasonably new CIE TPO still in silver (yes, INCLUDING that filthy roof AND ends!), followed by a GSR bogie mail van, as far as I can make out, and Bredins and laminates. I think I saw another black and white pic of this train - if it’s the same one, a wooden bogie and several tin vans took up the rear.
    1 point
  25. I've identified that six-wheeler I posted earlier. Obviously of GSWR parentage, it is no. 601, one of a pair of 3rd class saloons built in 1896, and withdrawn in 1957. The other was withdrawn in early 1955, just before the "A" class entered traffic, apparently. It had a toilet, which makes me think it was probably originally a first, but my GSWR notes do not confirm this. Internally it had two 18-seat compartments, each with a bench seat along the end, and side benches (note the window layout).They were seperated by a vestibule, on one side of which was the toilet, a wash hand basin on the other. There were all manner of oddities like this well into the 1960s, though only of bogie variety after March 1963, when the last passenger-carrying six-wheelers in traffic were withdrawn in Cork, boy. If anyone buys the Hattons six-wheelers, note that while most British six-wheelers seem to have only one footstep, two were fitted to almost every single Irish six-wheeler, on all company's lines.
    1 point
  26. Obviously when quite new, 1955. But look to the left; an 1890s GSWR 6-wheeled first class saloon, possibly now downgraded, with a much newer bogie behind it. Such was the contrast readily and regularly available.
    1 point
  27. Out on the main line, A25. The photographer seems to have either followed this train, or been on it, yet in a position to take a shot like this en route. in typical style, the first three carriages are of three different types.....
    1 point
  28. Courtaulds Carrickfergus, the four CSE Sugar Factories and the two NET/IFI fertiliser plants are probably the best examples of relatively modern large scale rail served manufacturing/process plants in Ireland. The main drawback in trying to model such large scale operations is the the sheer amount of space required to model either the marshalling yard or manufacturing/processing plant and limited operation potential compared to the more compact Victorian/Edwardian area operations such as Allman's Distillery in Bandon, and private sidings that served the milling industry and Ulster's Linen Industry. In its heyday in the era before Prohibition Allman's Distillery would have received coal and malt (bagged) in open wagons and sent out the finished product in covered tramway with "Pat" and its predecessor shunting wagons within the distillery and along the private siding tramway to the main line connection at Bandon Station. Similarly private sidings at stations such as Clara and Ballysodare generated a considerable volume of freight traffic, Clara was a particularly busy station in the wagon load era with private sidings serving Ranks Mill and the Goodbody textile factory which were shunted by a pilot loco (a G 601 in later years) that also worked the Banagher Goods The Goodbody mill received jute possibly in open wagons and dispatched the finished product in covered wagons. Ranks mill would have received grain in covered hoppers and possibly dispatched flour or animal feed in covered vans before the traffic was lost to rail. It could be argued that CIE lost a lot of traffic to road with its fixation with fixed formation Liner Trains in the 70s, with large shippers such as Bord na Mona, the Irish Sugar Company, Cadburys and grain millers shifting to road transport following the closure of the majority of private sidings in the 70s. Although the sugar company continued to be a major shipper rail was used mainly for long haul traffic from South Wexford to Thurles and later Mallow and between North Kerry and Dundalk/Navan to the Tuam Factory with Carlow the most productive plant served exclusively by road.
    1 point
  29. 1900s trains It's been a while since I shared some photos of Belmullet, so here are a few photos of the trains I'm assembling for the 1900s period. Whether I'm at home, or at exhibitions, I like my trains to have a real purpose, which in turn helps to assemble rakes that I hope are representative of both the period and local area. Belmullet is imagined to be served by no less than four 'pre-grouping' companies [rather like Sligo], so we have the SLNCR, WL&WR, MGWR and GS&WR. First up is a freight from the Sligo Leitrim. Harbour branch loco 'Lark' [aka Timoleague & Courtmacsherry's St Mologa] brings coal wagons up from the quay, then Small Tank Fermanagh arrives with a rake of cattle wagons. While Fermanagh goes on shed for turning & servicing, Lark shunts the two trains, so that the coal can go back towards Ballina and the cattle vans go down to the harbour. The two rakes rotate, turn and turn about - so it is either coal coming in by sea for domestic use, or arriving from the Arigna mines for use in either the distillery or by local shipping. The second freight is a mixed one, hauled by my Coey 101 class 0-6-0. This serves the station goods shed and is made up of wagons from different companies. At the moment, I'm experimenting with using Lark as the station pilot/shunter. Being small, it is ideal for shuffling wagons about, with the return trip eventually departing from the bay. Currently, most wagons are Sligo Leitrim, but the plan is to build one or two from GSWR, MGWR and WL&WR, plus a DSER short van is also underway. Rails to Achill has a photo of one of these, so I reason it could have made it to Belmullet as well. As for passenger traffic, we have the MGWR Mail Goods, plus a two coach GS&WR train. The 101 is doubling up on this for now, but eventually I hope to build either an F6 2-4-2T or another 4-4-0, maybe one of the 6'6 versions. There is also the WL&WR Mail Goods, but photos of that are on my workshop thread, from last week. Running trains has thrown up a few problems. One of the point motors needs adjusting, for some reason the turntable is not sending power to the track, plus the new signals need linking to the control panel. This will mean getting to the underside of the baseboards, which is always a pain, though with the hope that we may yet be getting back to exhibitions later in the year, there will be further work required to ensure the layout is both presentable and transportable, so the bullet needs biting...
    1 point
  30. Not the greatest original pic to work with, but the pic shows then-newish laminates with a green “A” + stripe. Unusually, coaches 2, 3 & (out of view) 4 are the same type, so this is possibly a special train intended to impress someone..... Recent comments elsewhere about accurate weathering may be interested in where the oil stains were on these Crossley beasts. Additional comments - now that I see this pic in a larger screen, the carriages carry the name boards used on the principal expresses, which I think dates it to the early 60s. As this train passes, Inchicore Works is probably performing its Unboxing Dance with brand new 121s, ready-fitted with kadees, 21mm gauge axles and sound chips.
    1 point
  31. The Irish Beet Factories are likely to have been sugar refineries capable of processing sugar all year round rather than during the campaign. The beet would have been stored or processed to an intermediate stage for further processing at a later stage. This would have reduced plant, warehousing and inventory costs. Similar principals apply in the dairy and meat processing industries. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sugar_refinery Inward Traffic: 1. Coal: The CSE factories and Cement Limited both received Arigna coal by rail into the late 1950s 2. Lime: 3. Beet: Outward 1. Beet Pulp: Transported in H Vans good photos of H Vans in empty beet trains in Rails Through North Kerry. 2. Refined sugar retail and commercial quantities: H vans until replaced by road transport. Carlow Factory dispatched export sugar in 20X 8'6" container on 4w flat wagons in special trains during the early 70s, trains ran as out of gauge specials, containers loaded while on wagons in factory rather than Carlow goods yard.
    1 point
  32. In response to a question, the stock in the train above is typical of the period; this train containing green laminates, a Park Royal, and (out of sight) at least one Bredin, more laminates of several types and what looked like a dirty silver tin van at the rear. I focussed in on the loco, as I will in the coming days. Today's picture, sticking with the "A" class, this at Mallow. The light green paint on the line along the side, and the "snail", have worn off - many photos show this line weathering badly, even when the main body colour was still smart enough. Mail van attached, still in "silver". Modeller's details: Water column on left, still very dirty / weathered green. Note the roof of the TPO. It looks black. It is important to note that like domes on blue GNR engines, or red Donegal engines, although these often LOOKED black, this was 100% dirt, and in all three cases were NEVER actually painted black. Similarly, silver coaching stock and locos never had black bogies - always also silver - but covered in gunge, gunk, oil and brake dust. Silver (unpainted) stock, despite being new, would on occasion still be steam hauled. Good luck with a clean roof on that one! This pic is the Kerry mail, so it will have about three passenger-carrying coaches behind it, plus one or two - or being a mail train maybe more - tin vans. More tomorrow.
    1 point
  33. Today in cool but somewhat creepy tech - there's actually a machine-learning algo / application that can generate a full 3D model of any person from only a single picture (no scanning required!): https://github.com/facebookresearch/pifuhd
    1 point
  34. With laser scanning and 3D printing, all you need to do is track the lady down and ask her if she is willing to have a model figure made from her. Might be getting on a bit by now though....
    1 point
  35. In the Old Testament days, there were a great many prophets who maintained the faith of the True Believers - MIR, Silver Fox and many others. But, it took the revelations of St Patrick to convert many more to the faith. The 141/181s and the Cravens showed many of those of us with a weaker faith that they simply needed to follow the correct path to salvation.
    1 point
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