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Showing content with the highest reputation on 01/06/21 in all areas

  1. Irish Wagon Range: We began June on a high note with the arrival of the test prints of a new model the GSR version of the IRCH 10T Standard Open wagon and an updated version of the GSR bulk grain wagon. We ran multiple test prints to identifty potential weaknesses in the CAD work under repetitive manufacturing conditions as we ran into problems with the grain wagon discharge gear and had to make a number of amendments to the brake van despite a number of successful test prints. The opens have turned out well but it looks like we missed out the bolt head detail of the diagonal strapping. The painting was a rush job the prints arrived this afternoon, the grey is a self etch primer, the red oxide a primer coat. I have a 1950s black and white photo of what appears to be a red hopper with black underframe and running gear. Discharge side our designer had fun and games modelling the linkages that operate the discharge gear with three attempts before coming up with a workable solution. Although the open and grain wagons share a 'common' standard IRCH/GSWR/GSR underframe the two types of wagons have buffers and suspension system (springs and hangers) which we have captured in the models. 20T Brake Van: We ran into some problems during the manufacture of the first batch of vans which has had a knock on effect on completing and assembling the wagons. It was necessary to re-design & strengthen some of the finer parts to minimise breakage during assembly as SLA prints are relatively brittle compared to injection molded plastic. We currently completing the assembly and painting of the first batch of vans and expect to have a small batch of vans with the flying snail logo available for marketing and review purposes by late June. The next step is to establish whether its feasible/viable to reproduce the 1960s/70s wasp striping to the sloping duckets using pad printing for a rtr model or use decals as a fall back option. All our 3D printed wagons are supplied with Bachmann couplers with NEM mount and OO gauge Markits wheels on 28mm axles. The models are easy to re-gauge to 21mm gauge simply by pushing the wheels out 19mm (OO running clearances) or 19.3mm (EM running clearances). We have not established a price point or set up a website for our Irish wagons at this stage as the viability of producing the wagons as rtr models or kits hinges on the successful completion of the Brake Van as our first 3D printed model and the ability of our suppliers and contractors to deliver. 52 Class & Tin Van Kits. We currently have the etched and cast metal parts for the 52 Class kit in stock. The castings for the tin van kits are in stock and the etched parts for the Post Office/Tool Van and final test etch for the revised Heating & Luggage and Luggage Vans are on order currently with a 4 week lead time. Some of the detail parts for these kits are out of stock with our suppliers in the UK mainly as a result of increased demand arising from the resurgence in modelling as a result of Covid restrictions in the UK and Europe. Our planned release of the 52 Class in July-August and the Tin Vans in Aug-September is dependent on these suppliers.
    18 points
  2. Well, I've managed to find some shelf space and built a new layout! Well at 50cm long it's more like a loco programming track but at least I can sit in the office with the sound of a diesel engine ticking over in the background!
    6 points
  3. Signal box diagram for the virtual signal box lever frame set. Points are in red, signals in purple. Will add a few manual ground signals on for fun too (ie track side levers).
    3 points
  4. Holywell Town ex LNWR always struck me as an ideal minimal space prototype. Only 4 points but a large 2 arch road bridge went across the station which would act as an ideal scenic break . The goods yard was the other side of the bridge alongside the running line which descended at 1 in 27 to the main line. Because the yard points faced the dead end rather than more conventionally (no doubt because of the topography) it meant that all the shunting of the yard took place at the 'dead end' and restricted to 1 or 2 wagons at a time. Photos on this site http://www.disused-stations.org.uk/h/holywell_town/index.shtml
    2 points
  5. The large platform is a goods bank on the right. The station platform was not on the direct run in from the junction but off to the right as seen on the last photo where the tram is on the passenger line and you can see the crossover from the running line behind it. Sorry for the dirty great ERNIE's Railway Archive COPYRIGHT overlays. Those images date from the time when someone was nicking images and flogging prints. I might get round to re-doing them but that old mans affliction known as Cantbearsedtosis is ever more present these days!
    2 points
  6. While I do not pretend to be an expert I submit my own attempt for your viewing
    2 points
  7. Thanks for the "save Trathnona" campaign but my employer has imposed a work from home contract so there's two of us working in a 8x6 room. By the time I've brought all my work kit and file's home, the office is a bit snug! However, I do have plans for a new layout on a spare shelf but at only 3ft long, it might be a bit tight for a 201 but will see where we go with it! finalrun.mp4
    2 points
  8. First attempt at weathering, using Humbrol weathering powders. Test on my UK stock before risking a Murphy Models loco.
    2 points
  9. Working on a small layout using an Ikea LACK shelf as a base. Measures 6 ft long and 10 inches wide and is DCC with one seep motor point. There's no fiddle yard as this would take up space so instead locos are moved on and off the layout and swapped between the two sets of track using Peco lifting cradles. Modelling post 2000 era and new to Irish rail scene as didn't develop an interest in railway modelling until 20 years after leaving Ireland so looking for advice on what to run. Layout name Trathnona, chosen by my daughter as she did a Google translate for her name, Eve!
    1 point
  10. Maybe worth posting a list and see what happens. What do you have in the way of the Roco stock? Any SNCF, SBB or FS?
    1 point
  11. Heading North or Southbound because, in the end I actually saw the empties heading north behind 088 at 16:10 through Howth Jnct so I’m all happy now!!! Thanks!
    1 point
  12. I sit in my study within sight of them. Sadly, they almost NEVER run to timetable path. In the early months of this year I made a note of what times they passed Malahide, and in a typical week one or two came along when they were supposed to. It seems that they dance to the tune of the mine, and try to slot in between passenger trains once they get to Drogheda. Northbound empties are just as random. This very day a northbound empties passed here (outside Malahide) at 12:00. It isn’t due until 14:36! One day I heard an 071 at 14:36 and went to the window expecting to see a northbound train - instead, a SOUTHBOUND working went past, at exactly the time a northbound should have. Hypothetically, but in reality almost never; Ex-Tara southbound laden: 09:10 12:15. 18:45 Ex-Dublin Port northbound empty: 13:50 18:50 23:05 That last one, the 23:05 north, is supposed to pass Malahide at 00:18, but it has passed here as early as 21:45 or so, and NEVER later than 23:40 in my time watching.
    1 point
  13. The gable end of the Tram Shed appears to be visible in the right background. According to the diagram the station building and platform are behind the trees in the right distance. The "platform" visible in the photo is the goods/cattle loading bank. Excellent not quite minimal space station shades of Bishops Castle with the station at right angles to the running line
    1 point
  14. It’s there JB - but very well camouflaged against the building behind it!
    1 point
  15. Happy Monday everyone! More A Class progress. As you can see the main body printing is now complete. Detail part painting is now underway and then it's the final assembly of body to chassis, then testing and packing in the coming weeks! We had to a large amount of work correcting the initial artwork on these when we first got decorated samples, but the hard work paid off. Order yours right here: https://irishrailwaymodels.com/collections/a-class-locomotive Cheers! Fran
    1 point
  16. Me to! Every so often in the process when things fit one sits back and thinks 'did I really make that' These moments drives one on through the mundane repeat process for the next eureka moment! Eoin
    1 point
  17. Shades of Steve Fletcher, horologist in The Repair Shop - find precision work like this just fascinating.
    1 point
  18. I am quiet happy with the way the 'Grey Engine" turned out as the original builder "gave up" on the loco after running into difficulties assembling a working chassis. The builder ran into similar difficulties assembling a number of locos to S4 standards and I picked up the J15 together with 4 other part built TMD loco kits at a UK exhibition. The J15 is a good example of how metal kits are nearly always salvagable as a lot of parts were missing and the chassis was nearly a write off, although the original Protofour wheels were not usable I used the motor and gearbox to re-build a C&L 4-4-0T.
    1 point
  19. Main chassis parts and the wheel bearings have been machined for the new chassis described above;- Chassis frames being machined out of .45mm nickel silver sheet. All the parts removed from the sheet and edges cleaned up. The coupling rods are in two parts and have been half cut for the overlap on the centre crankpin. The frames have been half drilled .5mm for embossing the rivets and a few .5mm holes drilled through for construction alignment pins. Also the front and rear frame spacers have tabs which fit in corresponding tab cuts in the frames which should aid construction. The two front axles run in full frame width brass bearings, cut from 4.74mm (3/16'') brass rod. The bearing rods are drilled and reamed to take the 3.1mm (1/8'') axles. Flats are milled on the sides of the bearing rods which will fit into the slots in the frames to allow up n down compensation movement and stop the bearings from rotating. There is an old 3.1mm axle in the bearing to stop the vice pressure deforming the bearing. Bearings complete with an axle test fitted. An oiling hole is drilled in the centre of the bearings and the centre axle bearing is 1.5mm shorter than the front to allow a bit of side-play for the curves! Next will be a bit of riveting, folding, fitting & soldering. Eoin
    1 point
  20. One down two left to go! The White Engine now the "Grey Engine" successfully re-assembled and test run though there is some work left to do including weighting the tender, finding and fitting buffer heads, lettering/number plate and couplings. Interestingly the GSR grey looks darker when viewed under soft lighting on the "layout" rather than a daylight bulb on the workbench. The loco test run without any sign of shorting despite full brake gear and very tight wheel/splasher clearance and runs slightly shorter than my two older J15s 191 & 193. Some work on 229 & the Z boiler loco grinding off excess metal and solder inside the splashers and test fitting a set of AGW driving wheels set with a 19.3 B-B leaving cigarette paper wheel-splasher running clearances. I am very reluctant to reduce to reduce the B-B Gauge to 19mm and adapt OO running clearances as this is likley to lead to running problems with the majority of my 21mm gauge locos which are fitted with the narrower Sharman driving wheels.
    1 point
  21. The "White Engine" has finally become the "Grey Loco", I haven't decided on a number at this stage, I need to check on the locos rostered to Tuam Shed between the 1930s & mid 1950s. Sub-assemblies on the assembly bench. I primed the loco with a Finixia grey etch primer followed with a grey laquer topcoat matched to a sample of GSR/CIE paint provided by JHB. I decided to assemble "The Grey Loco" to reduce the number of incomplete projects before undertaking further work on 229 and the Superheated J15. I tidied up the splashers and sandbox linkages on both locos, the main challenge is achieving sufficient running clearance between the splashers and the locomotive driving wheels set with a 19.3 B-B gauge.
    1 point
  22. Another productive weekend at Maam cross station when the volunteers installed a ground frame which was connected to the points leading to the platform, the ground frame is fully interlocked with the points and can only be released by the insertion of an ETS staff, well done to all concerned. The photos show the first train to operate over the interlocked points.
    1 point
  23. Well I left everything on the workbench for a week and no long lost parts turned up, I better put them back in the scrap box for another year or so. The white engine is now another grey engine. I washed the loco and tender in hot water followed by a good scrub with an old tooth brush & washing powder to remove any residual flux and 10-15 year grime and gave the loco & tender body a mist coat of grey aerosol etch primer. Luckily the etch primer did not react with the existing white primer. A some sanding followed by a second coat of primer disguised most of the blemishes. It looks like the loco will be in late GSR early CIE condition with hungry boards on the tender modeled from ply sleeper strip to be followed by another coat of primer and GSR grey enamel. I removed the driving splashers from Coey J15 229 as there was insufficient clearance between the driving wheels and splashers when I test fitted the wheel sets. The Alan Gibson wheels which I am using in the two new locos are approx. 0.24mm wider than the Sharman wheels which I fitted to my older J15s. The problem arose because I did not remove the temporary splasher sides that are used to align and support the footplate while fitting the valences and forming the curved running board. I am using a piece of hardwood to support the running board when I replace the splashers. The valences and running board were assembled with a higher temperature (179) solder than that used in the general assembly of the loco to minimise the risk of parts falling off during final assembly.
    1 point
  24. A bit more work on the "White Engine" mainly completing detailing and fitting the loco tender drawbar. I thought I had mislaid the smokebox door and ended up fitting one of my own GSR style doors complete with hand wheel before finding the original in the scrap box, one of the next big jobs (after painting) is finding the bufferheads and fitting the front 3 link coupling . I used some suitable riveted strapping from the scrap box to represent the riveted strip between cab side and running board a distinctive feature of these locos, the original strapping was still in place on the fireman's side. Although its difficult to see I fabricated and fitted the loco-tender drawbar from an offcut of PCB sleeper strip. The cab interior involved some skulldugery. The splasher tops/seats are part of the original model, the backhead from another J 15 kit and the cab floor from a MGWR 2-4-0. I used a piece of scrap brass to replace the section of firebox that had been cut away/removed during the assembly of the original model. Next stage will be to dismantle the loco and tender to its component sub assemblies to prepare for painting. Interestingly I 'found" another Mashima 10X20 motor in the J 15 parts box to complete the assembly of the "Coey" J15 .
    1 point
  25. Continuing on with the loco and tender brake gear assembly. The phosphor bronze wire through the hornboxes is to temproarily secure the bearings and wheel sets in position while I am testing the chassis for free running and fitting the brake gear. I set up the brake gear by first threading the inner brake pullrods onto the 0.45mm wire stretcher bars. I soldered the pullrods to the hangers before soldering the inner pullrods in place. I used card packers to make sure that there was adequate running clearance between the outer pullrods and the wheels in order to avoid a short. The inner pullrods should be closer to the wheels, I find it easier to line up the inner pull rods with the main frames useful when using OO/EMF wheel standards and running clearances. Completed brake gear, showing the misaligned pull rod on the leading driving axle which will need attention before painting and final assembly. The tender brake gear is similar but with a different brake hanger arrangement. The chassis was assembled by the original builder and incorporates the original machined brass frame spacers, I replaced the original S4 wheels and bearings and painted the chassis after I bought the loco about 20 years ago. The first job in the current re-build was to drill/clean out the pin holes for the brake pivot rods and spacers, I began using short pieces of small dia brass tube for setting up brake gear on brass kits during the 1990s and assembling the brake gear as a removable sub assembly. I used to cut the tube to length using a crude jig, but picked up a cutting jig from a visiting Australian model makers tool supplier which makes things a lot simpler. I bought a similar tool from Micromark in the US which was not really suitable for small scale modelling. The GSWR tender brake hanger arrangement is reasonably conventional, I used my usual assembly set up using a short piece of 0.45mm wire drilled into a piece of hardwood bolted to the workbench. Tender brake gear sub assemblies. I dropped a clanger on setting up the pullrods as they fouled on the wheel bearings and was unable to fit them outside the tender main frames. This turned out simple enough to amend in situ by lining up one of the pullrods with the inside of the frame on one side and gradually moving the opposite rod over by heating with the soldering iron. I fitted the outside rods again using card as packing pieces while soldering then trimmed the ends of the stretcher bars . Loco and tender with break gear fitted, the next major jobs are completing the cab interior, fabricating a loco tender drawbar, setting up a power connection between the loco and tender and general tidy up and complete loco detailing
    1 point
  26. A bit more progress on the "White Engine" I haven't decided on a number at this stage, though I will probably pick one of the saturated locos that was based at Tuam or Limerick that worked over the Burma Road. The mystery of the driving wheels sorted it self out when I found another set of Sharman driving wheels in the J15 bits and pieces box that matched the leading and driving wheelset in the photo in the last post. There must be a matching set somewhere for the wheels for the training axle. I fitted new matching hornblock bearings to all three axles, the bearings required minor fettling to slide up and down in the leading and center hornblocks the trailing axle is rigid with the bearings a push fit into the hornblocks. The compensation beam assembly and main frames and ashpan sides are the only remaining parts from the original chassis. I set the wheels up using a GW Wheelpress which also quarters the wheels on the axles and ran into a problem with the trailing and driving wheel set binding when I fitted the coupling rods. I swapped the rods with a set from another J15 and the problem disappeared, I set up the hornblocks on 3 J15 chassis at the same time and may have got the roads mixed up. I test fitted the body and completed some of the finer detail at this stage before tackling the brake gear and tender chassis. The wheels revolved without binding when I pushed the loco along the workbench and all 6 wheels were sitting on the workbench a very good sign! I fitted the cab spectacle plates and replaced the sandbox operating rod on the drivers side, but still need to fit lampirons and do something about the riveted strip between cab and footplate. The cab interior needs a lot of work the original builder cut off the section of firebox that projects into the cab, though luckily enough I have a spare cab backplate. I produced a set of etched J15 brake gear parts, the brake gear from the original kit was missing and its difficult to drill and fold the nickel silver brake gear parts from the SSM kit. The replacement brake gear parts are basically a 'blown up' brass version of the SSM brake gear. First challenge was to test the concept by assembling a driving brake hanger and shoe using an 0.5mm drill bit as its not practicable to etch an 0.5mm dia hole in o.4mm brass. Hanger & brake shoes drilled and pivots folded. Soldering the brake shoes to the hangers is extremely challenging without some form of jig or fixture. I threaded a piece of 0.45mm mire through the holes in the brake hanger and soldered at on end, leaving the other end free Crude but it does the job, I fixed a short piece of strip wood to a block of balsa as a stop, then pinned the brake hanger to the balsa with a short piece of 0.45 brass wire, then threaded the brake shoe in position before soldering. Assembled brake shoe and hanger before removing the ends of the pins and cleaning up. Brake show and hanger fitted to a Superheated a Chassis
    1 point
  27. Here are a few graphics that show the make-up of the chassis in 3d;- The front wheel axle bearings go into the frame slots before the frame spacers are soldered in, there is a hole in the middle/front of the bearing tubes for oiling the axles. Eoin
    1 point
  28. New arrivals on the layout!
    1 point
  29. Ballast ploughs weathered, not particularly happy with the result as my usual method of a wash of thinned down matt cote and weathering powders resulted in the livery washing off the model!
    1 point
  30. Back from Model Rail Scotland with a handful of LEDs snd spent the night lighting the layout!
    1 point
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