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  1. It is with great regret that I have to pass on the news of our friend Glover passing “to his reward”. Behind the pseudonym was a quiet, much-loved family man – Aidan Dunne. I received a letter from his wife Barbara yesterday, telling me that he had passed away in early August. I had been in touch with her, after Aidan expressed a desire to see his work retained in some way. I made some progress with that back on August. I last met Aidan exactly a year ago, at Blackrock, when he bought the CIE Cattle kits which you can see, superbly built and finished, in an earlier post on the Glover’s Workbench thread. Take a look at that thread and the Pettigo Co Donegal thread to see some very fine scratch-building – what we modellers of an earlier era have to do. He showed great ingenuity and skill to produce just the coaches and other rolling stock which he wanted. Please join me in passing on condolences to Aidan’s wife Barbara, daughter Paula and the rest of the family circle. May he Rest In Peace. Leslie
    31 points
  2. Hi everyone, There has been some silence on this project and I must admit that's down to IRM, and not Robert, so apologies to both Robert and all of you who are interested in this footbridge for that. We were so impressed with Robert's design and attention to detail that we approached him with a view to mass produce his footbridge design rather than do a small run 3D print, which he has very graciously agreed to. So, this will be a new scenic accessory from IRM! What's more, we are working on a modular concept for the bridge, allowing for various spans and orientations, giving you greater flexibility to fit in on your layout! The plan is that it will fully painted and with the bare minimum for assembly. We are currently working with our factory to get this production ready, and we will have a full update and launch including specs, prices, ordering information and more later this year, so please bare with us on that. We will have more details in due course, but with the design being so good and now with a factory fit and finish, it promises to be a must have for any Irish layout! Cheers! Fran
    29 points
  3. Today, the 15th of August, would have been the traditional fair day in Borris, Co. Carlow which would have seen the now closed Borris Railway station hosting trains of passengers and cattle coming to the fair. The impressive 16 arch Borris viaduct has recently been officially reopened as a walkway. Yesterday I finally installed a photo backdrop of Mount Leinster onto my layout so although still a work in progress I think it's a good day to show a few photos of my layout. It incorporates Borris Station and the viaduct. Bagenalstown Station will be added at a later stage. First layout so go easy as I'm learning as I go.
    26 points
  4. Some photos of layout named after a combination of my local, Heuston Station (for the passenger stock) & North Wall (for the freight). Era is loosely based around 2005 - 2008 when you could still see Cravens, Mark 3's, 141 & 181 in operation, along side 071 and 201 class locos. I took the photos after l removed the stock to clean the rails- rare to have nothing on it! I don't have the expertise of most on here on the modelling front. l owe a huge amount to so many guys here who helped along the way. It was kinda the dream even getting to this point and there is a long way to go but here's where l am today.
    26 points
  5. Its a few weeks since I managed to do any more work on Four Masters Bridge, but have done a bit today. The main hold up was finding a source of small fragments of stone and sand so that I could detail the river bank. Last Saturday we went to the seaside and I filled a small doggy bag on the beach but on getting it home realised that the contents were a kaleidoscope of colours with a high content of coal dust etc. Not very suitable unfortunately. I pondered over where I could find a supply of material with more appropriate colouring and it came to me this morning that approx 90 seconds walk away from where I have resided for the last 30 years is the River Tyne which possibly might have the odd pebbles and correctly coloured sand. I accordingly dragged one of the dogs out for a mid-day constitutional and on finding a suitable supply loaded a dog bag and put it in my pocket. Disaster! One of the old dears observed me doing this, and didn't notice that the contents hadn't just seen the light of day from the dogs rear. My behaviour has no doubt been broadcast through the local Granny Mafia Media and I shall no doubt be getting a few peculiar looks over the next few days! Here are a couple of views - appears to look (and smell) OK
    24 points
  6. This really gets my goat up PM slogging away on his own working from detailed drawings and talking with people who worked on the locos. Then he lands out a 6 figure sum , eventually gets the locos delivered, then distributed and a keyboard warrior comes along and complains about boxes being silver not white! Jesus wept man admire the models for what they are and praise what has been done correctly, give the man a brake! And play with them
    24 points
  7. Hi everyone, Today (October 16th) is a bit of a landmark day for IRM as it is 5 years since we broke cover publicly for the first time! From a chat online, to a few pints in a pub to something which has well, gotten way out of hand, we have come a long way in a short period of time. There has been some great moments along the way, and some set backs too (typhoons, our social event thwarted by snow!) but we are delighted to be here and to have you with us along the way too. Without your support and purchases, there would be no IRM after all! A couple of weeks after we announced ourselves to the world on this very forum, our good friends at South Dublin Model Railway Club gave us some space at the last minute at their Blackrock Hallowe'en show. We will be forever grateful to all the model railway clubs in the land who have supported and hosted us over the years at shows and clubrooms. To show our appreciation to you all for your support, we are doing a very rare sale as a thank you for this weekend! We have reduced all our IRM in stock items on the website by 10%! Just simply add your weedspray, cement bubbles, plough vans or spoils to the basket and you will get 10% off at the check-out! This sale is open till lunchtime on Monday, or while stocks last! We would also like to hear of your IRM related stories or memories and see some pictures or videos of our models on your layout or in your collections in the comments below. Cheers once again for all your support and here's to more models in the future! Fran (on behalf of the IRM / Accurascale team!)
    24 points
  8. Irish Wagon Range: We began June on a high note with the arrival of the test prints of a new model the GSR version of the IRCH 10T Standard Open wagon and an updated version of the GSR bulk grain wagon. We ran multiple test prints to identifty potential weaknesses in the CAD work under repetitive manufacturing conditions as we ran into problems with the grain wagon discharge gear and had to make a number of amendments to the brake van despite a number of successful test prints. The opens have turned out well but it looks like we missed out the bolt head detail of the diagonal strapping. The painting was a rush job the prints arrived this afternoon, the grey is a self etch primer, the red oxide a primer coat. I have a 1950s black and white photo of what appears to be a red hopper with black underframe and running gear. Discharge side our designer had fun and games modelling the linkages that operate the discharge gear with three attempts before coming up with a workable solution. Although the open and grain wagons share a 'common' standard IRCH/GSWR/GSR underframe the two types of wagons have buffers and suspension system (springs and hangers) which we have captured in the models. 20T Brake Van: We ran into some problems during the manufacture of the first batch of vans which has had a knock on effect on completing and assembling the wagons. It was necessary to re-design & strengthen some of the finer parts to minimise breakage during assembly as SLA prints are relatively brittle compared to injection molded plastic. We currently completing the assembly and painting of the first batch of vans and expect to have a small batch of vans with the flying snail logo available for marketing and review purposes by late June. The next step is to establish whether its feasible/viable to reproduce the 1960s/70s wasp striping to the sloping duckets using pad printing for a rtr model or use decals as a fall back option. All our 3D printed wagons are supplied with Bachmann couplers with NEM mount and OO gauge Markits wheels on 28mm axles. The models are easy to re-gauge to 21mm gauge simply by pushing the wheels out 19mm (OO running clearances) or 19.3mm (EM running clearances). We have not established a price point or set up a website for our Irish wagons at this stage as the viability of producing the wagons as rtr models or kits hinges on the successful completion of the Brake Van as our first 3D printed model and the ability of our suppliers and contractors to deliver. 52 Class & Tin Van Kits. We currently have the etched and cast metal parts for the 52 Class kit in stock. The castings for the tin van kits are in stock and the etched parts for the Post Office/Tool Van and final test etch for the revised Heating & Luggage and Luggage Vans are on order currently with a 4 week lead time. Some of the detail parts for these kits are out of stock with our suppliers in the UK mainly as a result of increased demand arising from the resurgence in modelling as a result of Covid restrictions in the UK and Europe. Our planned release of the 52 Class in July-August and the Tin Vans in Aug-September is dependent on these suppliers.
    23 points
  9. Well, I've managed to find some shelf space and built a new layout! Well at 50cm long it's more like a loco programming track but at least I can sit in the office with the sound of a diesel engine ticking over in the background!
    21 points
  10. A brief update to the layout - there have been a number of new acquisitions for the motive power lineup and one end of the scenic section has received an upgrade with the addition of trees and other scenic details.
    21 points
  11. Irish Footbridge I have modelled the footbridge that is present in Wellingtonbridge. This footbridge is similar to many of the pedestrian bridges seen across the Irish Rail network. There are several models available which could be used to represent an Irish footbridge, including one from York Modelmaking which I read about recently. To match the prototype, there are 16 steps on the station side and 17 steps with a few additional concrete steps on the non-station side, which matches the layout of Wellingtonbridge. I went to additional effort to represent the design of the steps, pillars and even the raised tread on the walkway surfaces and the third picture shows some of the detail that I did achieve. I feel like the gaps of lattice design on the parapets are slightly too large and the printer did not manage to reproduce the rivets at the crossing points. Print time for this model was 16 hours and the model was printed in 3 parts. Some of the details are difficult to see on this non-painted print.
    21 points
  12. A few photos of murphy models 121 B134 on barrow street and the holy trinity regards warb
    21 points
  13. After many twists and turns, and a house move, I am delighted to have had a visit from Baseboard Dave today with a vanload of great goodies. Dugort Harbour has arrived. Dave will post a pile of pics later on, but a few teasers here; it's 20th July 1964 and the 17:35 to Castletown West is about to depart - or it would, if the height of the layout matched the further extension that it is going to be connected to - but that's in hand. As originally conceived, it was to be a standalone shunting layout, based on a place like Baltimore, Valentia Harbour or Westport Quay. The idea was to have this plus a fiddle yard; trains leaving the place going along a fictitious four or five mile branch to the nearest big town. It has an air of desolation to it. This is intentional, though a West Cork / Kerry-like corrugated sheet station building will be added when I get around to it, plus a few people and cars. The prototypes mentioned above only seem to have survived as they were too insignificant to be worth listing for closure in themselves - though Westport Quay was retained in order to provide access for a fuel tanker to stabled buses - this is imitated here with an oil tanker grounded for the same purpose; a raison d'etre for such a lonely place to retain a train service at all. Like many lines that CIE want to close, the service is sparse. A daily goods will serve the place, with a morning and evening passenger train, mixed in steam days. It will only come to life when the local GAA crowd set off en masse for Croker, the beet season is in full swing, or the monthly cattle fair is due. In the fictitious setting, now that it is in a new house, there is scope for extension (hence the mismatching height of new boards installed and ready for track!). This extension will include a medium sized town station, from where the main line train from Cork or Dublin arrives twice daily, a la Lismore / Dungarvan, Clonmel or Bantry. A connection goes out to Dugort Harbour. Once the "main" station is complete, the main line trains will leave there to a fiddle yard, so the routine will be Fiddle Yard ----(main line)---- Castletown West ----(branch)---- Dugort Harbour. One thing that initial trials show up is the bad idea of various RTR and kit-built stock having slightly different couplings; derailments galore. I may well foist some 15 locos and 50 coaches and wagons some day on some poor soul with a request to put kadees on the lot. Just a few adjustments. Buildings have to be added (I have a goods shed started). Slight adjustment to a platform edge, as it and a JM Design "tin van" have fallen out over clearance issues, but that's easily fixed. Backscenes are desperately needed; that will be a priority. The "main" station will have a turntable, allowing locos to turn before going back to "Cork", a fictitious two or so hours away. But on the branch, the old turntable pit is filled in and the shed demolished; it IS the "swinging sixties" after all, so tender first running there. So, back to a summer evening back in 1964. Bet you didn't know they had drones back then.......... From the goods yard gate, stock lying about. And from a very youthful ”TTCs” or “Wanderer’s” drone….
    20 points
  14. Locomotive 146 idling with a short set of Cravens (1544, 1521, 1529) and BR Gen. Van (3192) in the sidings at Heuston North.
    20 points
  15. Even though we all knew what to expect from recent photos, I have to say I'm blown away by the detail on this beauty up close. It has without doubt, been worth the wait. Most will probably prefer to double head with another 121. But I also have a soft spot for the pairing below. Have to also point out, despite the age difference between both models, the 141/181 still stands up extremely well against the new offering with regards to detail. Just highlights yet again what Mr Murphy achieved all those years ago.
    20 points
  16. Ye gods, but it is hot! Not exactly modelling weather... Had a week in Northumberland, which the weather did its best to spoil, but in the end it was ok. Beamish museum is rather splendid and though the trams wren't running, the early double decker buses were, as was their replica Puffing Billy. Meanwhile a boat trip around the Farne Islands added a few ticks to my annual bird watching list. Sort of feathered train spotting I guess! Once we got back home, it was a case of trying to finish the F6. Probably went at it too hard with the rest of the transfers as ended up with a migraine, so very much lesson to self to take it easy on these intense bits of work. However, it is done, along with a bit of gentle weathering and coal in the bunker.
    19 points
  17. Today the last of the remaining B134 locomotives sold out. A huge thank you to all those who have supported the RPSI in this venture. This project has brought in vital income at a time when all our normal operations have come to a halt along with the associated income. This project would not have been possible without the generous assistance from Paddy Murphy of Murphy Models with the production and supply of the models. Also the team at IRM who volunteered their assistance with the hosting of sales, dealing with orders and dispatching the models to customers. We also had a number of Mk2 coach packs made available and these sold out in record time through the IRM site. a very small number of individual coaches remain. The success of these models along with the previously released Cravens gives plenty to consider regarding possible future releases. A number of options are under consideration and hopefully it wont be too long before we can announce the next project. The income raised from the sale of the models ensures that work can continue on the restoration of the real B134 in Inchicore Works along with other things like insurance etc which still have to be paid. On behalf of the RPSI- thank you. Gerry
    19 points
  18. The first photo shows a finished model, the second has yet to have rust applied.
    19 points
  19. I have not been able to spend time on the layout following foot surgery which unfortunately did not go as planned. Following my new podiatrists orders I am spending my days on the sofa with my foot elevated. A bright spot today was the arrival of a couple of 121's. I couldn't resist posing one on the layout and taking a few photos.
    19 points
  20. just got this from facebook if its genuine which i believe its going to be great for us Great news from Paddy Murphy !! 201 Class locomotives There will be short production runs of the 201 Class locomotive in three different liveries. These will be the most recent Enterprise livery, the interim Black & Silver 'Raccoon' livery and the Intercity green/silver livery with the current IE logo. Exact schedule is not available at present but it is hoped late 2021/first half 2022. Because of the small quantities involved, these will be allocated to model shops on a fair Pro-rata basis. Mk2d Air-conditioned stock The next release of these coaches will be produced in IR livery. Versions will be Full First, Composite, Standard, Restaurant and EGV. In addition, to complement the existing EGV and Restaurant stock, Standard class coaches in the 'Galway' livery will also be produced. Minor adjustments will be made to existing tooling where necessary. Similar schedule to Class 201. Mk3 stock It is over 20 years ago since Murphy Models last produced ready to run Irish Mk3 stock. It is planned to release a brand-new range of CIE, IR and IE Mk3 coaches featuring all new tooling incorporating all the unique features of the Irish Mk3. This will include items such as plug doors. Proposed versions across the liveries will be- EGV, First, Composite, City-Gold, Restaurant, Standard and Executive. It is also planned to produce the suburban version of the Mk3 with the hopper windows as well as the push-pull driving trailer. Craven I am also considering a new production of Craven coaches. This is subject to there being enough interest to make such a project economically viable.
    18 points
  21. The greening of Gort has started. Step one pasture and dry stone walls typical of Co Galway. Lots more to do, but enjoying the landscaping bit. Dry stone walls made from strips of foam sanded to simulate stone. Plaster cloth and some scultamold painted acrylic brown (from art shop). Its just the beginning, lots of foliage, hedgerows and trees to follow and a bit of flooding in the bottom field.
    18 points
  22. Getting closer and closer... Look out for more pics in the coming days... Cheers! Fran
    18 points
  23. Work is continuing in the shed, making tunnel entrances and fitting on the layout and on some rolling stock, a few pictures, short videos and a few drone views of the progress of the layout. TDR 1a.mp4 2a.mp4 3a.mp4 4a.mp4 5a.mp4 6a.mp4 7a.mp4
    18 points
  24. IRISH RAIL WEED SPRAYING COACH I have been working on a BR MK1 coach to convert it into a weed spraying coach to go with my IRM weed spraying wagons. I worked with Allen at Worsley Works to get some brass etches made to apply to the coach. A lot of work was needed to modify the coach body by removing some things and adding new details. Here are some pictures of the process.
    18 points
  25. Drowes River Bridge basic painting now completed.
    18 points
  26. Few more pics. Got the guttering and down pipes done. Used a ratio guttering kit. Now just need a fews sacks of produce and a few wooden barrels outside. No pallets in this era, no fork lift trucks. This was before modern era, bogies and containers. All manually loaded produce in the CIE golden era. The ratio guttering accessory kit was handy, saved me forming realistic gutters from heated plastic strips. A bit of fiddling here to figuratively ensure water would flow downhill from the overhang into the main roof down pipe. Will have to put drain traps on the ground below these. Overall pleased to have a unique scale model of a real building as it was back around 1970. The basic structure of this building still exists but its all boarded up now.
    18 points
  27. These Black'n'Tan livery MM 121s are just gorgeous. B125 got a very light dusting in the sheep dip. Just enough to get the plastic shine off it.
    18 points
  28. Having completed the major scenic work and cleaned up the layout area it's a good time for a video showing how the layout fits into the available space. Our condo is split level, the stairs in the video comes down from the upper floor which is at ground level. This area has no windows, being a partial basement and the temperature remains constant throughout the year making it a perfect environment for a model railway. The area was originally intended as a storage room but the original owner had the builder omit the door and wall, finish the space, installed numerous electrical outlets and cable TV and called it a media room. Maureen agreed to me using the space for the layout "as long as it is tidy and looks good" 20201018_122448.mp4
    18 points
  29. Some photos for us fellow modellers to drool over! With the kind permission of, and on behalf of Sean Hogan who commissioned it, this is his recently completed gauge O, 7mm working scale model of the GSR's flagship 800 class steam locomotive 'Maedb'. It was built by Brendan Kelly from a kit, which I believe was produced, many moons ago, by the Model Railway Shop in Monck Place in Phibsboro, Dublin. Eoin Murray then completed the valve gear, painted, lined and detailed the model. The photographs do not do it justice - it is a magnificent model in every respect, and massive credit is due to the skills and talents of Brendan and Eoin in bringing it to fruition!
    18 points
  30. The last couple of weeks have been busy with other stuff, including the need to get Fintonagh ready for the Bexhill Show, but attention now turns to ensuring Belmullet is ready for its debut at Uckfield on 16th & 17th October. At least, that is the plan anyway. Hence, the turntable has been bedded into the surrounding scenery, while I've done bits and pieces to disguise the baseboard joins. In addition, the leading edge of the baseboards has been given a hedgerow border, the latter made from rubberised horsehair covered in scatter material. In order to make the layout presentable, the front will be given a pelmet and side wings to frame the scene, while skyboards will raise the rear scenery by about 30cm. These will all be separate pieces that will need to break down for transport. Speaking of which, I also need to ensure the layout will fit in the car. This is a Skoda Karoq, which has removable rear seats, effectively turning it into a small van. However, with the baseboards crated up in pairs, plus trestles and supporting beams, pelmets, lighting and information boards at the front, some careful planning is needed - especially as, in having the layout with two distinct operating periods, there is quite a lot of stock to take with me too. It is at times like this, I find myself envying Angus and his 5p workbench as I'm looking at around 18-20 A4 box files.
    17 points
  31. It is either a Sunday, or [as per jhbachill], there are a number of special trains that have just arrived and their locos are on shed for servicing. Either way, a few pictures of the newly installed and bedded in turntable
    17 points
  32. Hello everyone, so I've been tempted over by those makers of the green boxes (IRM/ACC) and thought I would say hi and post up a couple of photos of one of the train sets that I exhibit. So first up is Thorne Yard. Its a wagon repair depot in the the 1980s. The layout is DCC with all locos being sound fitted and all rolling stock is detailed, renumbered (if there is more than one) and weathered. If you have any questions then please ask. More photos to come Thanks Simon
    17 points
  33. Super Train time! One of the iconic A Class liveries and heralding a new and optimistic age for Irish railways, the Supertrain livery is a must for anyone modelling the 1970s-late 1980s. Check out 018 in this classic paint job. Naturally this has been a very popular livery and a great era for both passenger and freight. Personally I cant wait to see these weathered up! Grab yours here https://irishrailwaymodels.com/collections/a-class-locomotive
    17 points
  34. Hi all Just a quick update showing recent vehicle additions and using up left over bits and pieces of plastic parts and card to make up part of depot stores and signals workshops and stores. Also a quick peek at some new signals and gantries I’m constructing using plastic card, left over ratio parts and some scale model scenery walkways, with all working signals. Just have a little more work to do on some parts, then fit and connect to control panel, Thanks for looking in TDR
    17 points
  35. Hi all just sent in a few pics of my small boxfile layout . it will run a few different types of rolling stock inc gypsum and fertiliser and poss cement hope you like it . work still in progress .
    17 points
  36. Happy Monday everyone! More A Class progress. As you can see the main body printing is now complete. Detail part painting is now underway and then it's the final assembly of body to chassis, then testing and packing in the coming weeks! We had to a large amount of work correcting the initial artwork on these when we first got decorated samples, but the hard work paid off. Order yours right here: https://irishrailwaymodels.com/collections/a-class-locomotive Cheers! Fran
    17 points
  37. While I do not pretend to be an expert I submit my own attempt for your viewing
    17 points
  38. Finally got around to doing some work on this layout. Many other projects, including 305mm scale have kept me busy. Got some paint onto the mineral wagons, which still need to be weathered. A little bit of gardening and weatering on the model has helped to tone it down & plant it in the secene. Still some more to do, but it's all part of the process. It should be on display in Bray on Sunday for those who can get about. Ken
    17 points
  39. Hi everyone, Now that Chinese New Year is over, work continues on our A Class models. As you can see above, the injection moulding is complete, and painting is now underway. Then it will be assembly, testing, packing and shipping to Dublin! We will have further updates in the coming weeks, but at the time of writing we are still on course for a delivery of late May. Cheers! Fran
    17 points
  40. Some platform walls constructed today. Capping stone done via strip of balsa shaped to half round and scored to represent each capping stone. Will weather these in a day or so when the paint is dry. These small walls are a distinctive feature of Gort. Now to find the right Gaelic font on my mac for the station board name. Gort's essence is an overall greyness from all the stone. Will weather these walls tomorrow. Pleased with the way the balsa worked into the wall.
    17 points
  41. More done and ready for final varnishing and glazing
    17 points
  42. Work in progress
    17 points
  43. We received the decorated sample of the van in the CIE Flying Snail scheme today, so could not resist doing an update this evening! Working with an Auckland based pad printing business & SSM to produce the graphic design was the final piece in the jigsaw to produce the Brake Van as a rtr model as opposed to a kit. We have finalised the 3D CAD work for the model including a re-designed roof and removable NEM coupler pockets to allow modellers to fit their personal choice of couplers. The van will be supplied in OO with either Markits or NorthYard NMRA 110 profile wheels and tension lock couplers, the van is designed to be re-gauged to 21mm either by pushing out the stock wheels on their axles or replacing with EM or P4 wheelsets. The brake shoes are a push fit into rebates in the chassis. The production version will be 3D printed in resin using SLA technology as the numbers did not stack up for a plastic injection moulded model and resin casting was not an available option. There are a few issues related to the limitations of the 3D printing process which we hope to resolve including those little dimples visible in one balcony end. We expect to start marketing the model through on-line media and the Model Press during the first quarter of 2021 for potential release in Mid-Late 2021
    17 points
  44. Taken lunchtime today! No words needed!
    17 points
  45. Back to the 1900s Recent work on the GSWR Brake 3rd, plus new wheels for WL&WR 0-6-0 Shannon have all been about moving Belmullet backwards about 50 years to the early 1900s. A few liberties are being taken, because my 101 0-6-0, being a later Coey engine, wasn't built until 1903, while the WL&WR had already been taken over/absorbed by the GSWR by then. However, it always took time for locos and stock to be repainted, so hopefully what I'm doing isn't too outrageous, although a railway to Belmullet never existed anyway of course. Anyway, Shannon now has its new wheels and the bodywork has been given a further bit of TLC, touching up paint chips here and there, plus a bit more work with T-cut to freshen up the rest. Still needs balance weights to be added to the wheels, while have just noticed one of the handrails need straightening - is any model ever really finished? However, was keen to pose and operate the two new trains to herald the move back in time. Shannon's train is very much a nod to creator Richard Chown, being what he called a 'Mail Goods'. This featured on his Castle Rackrent system and as well as Shannon, I also have his two Dublin and Meath brake vans. Quite why he built even one of these is anybody's guess, but he was often drawn to obscure prototypes and with their salmon pink ends, these vans are certainly that. The rest of the train comprises my own scratchbuilt models of a WL&WR full brake, plus a carriage truck from the same company. On Castle Rackrent, photos show a carriage truck on the Mail Goods, sporting what looks like a horse drawn pantechnicon - there's a word for you! These days we call it a removal van. My fiddle yard is 43 inches long, but Shannon's train is only 39 inches - hence not enough room for another wagon. The WL&WR did have a couple of six wheel carriage trucks, but at just over 9 inches long, there is not enough room for one of these. At the moment anyway! The 101's train has previously been described as a private excursion, though with a six wheel first, brake third and two horse boxes, probably works as an ordinary service train too. However, 101 0-6-0s rarely ventured this far north or west, so a 'special' probably makes more sense. The two trains are shown with Shannon waiting in the bay, ready to depart east, then south for Limerick with mail and parcels, while the 101 leaves first for [eventually] Dublin or Cork. Suspect the coaches will be added to another train somewhere further on.
    17 points
  46. Hi everyone, Many thanks for the pictures and stories. We really get a great buzz about seeing IRM on layouts, weathered up, catalogued and collected and overall enjoyed. We set out as hobbyists to fulfil a gap in our hobby on the back of an outcry on the forum. @BosKonaybrought us together and the rest they say is history! We're proud of what we have achieved and very lucky to take it to full time status. However, personally, I am blown away by @Edo's story. It's brilliant that a hobby can make a difference for us and take us in a new, better direction. 2020 will go down as one of the toughest years ever for us all I am sure but hopefully the forum and IRM can keep us in escapism together while we go through these strange times. It's what the forum is about and what this hobby is about too. We are working away on new projects and we think you are really going to like our next all new announcement. Tooling is underway and from now on we are announcing with tooling samples only to cut down on waiting times. However, this still gives a number of months to save up those pennies until delivery. In the meantime we've extended the sale to 2pm tomorrow. Remember, it's for in stock IRM items and the discount is automatically removed at the check out. Enjoy the bargains, stay safe, enjoy the forum and the hobby! It is, after all, the perfect way to spend the winter months especially during any lock down situations we may find ourselves in! https://irishrailwaymodels.com/ Cheers! Fran
    17 points
  47. The vans have now been through both the paint shop and the weathering process. First step was a spray of Halford's grey primer. Next came the lettering and numbering, using a dipping pen and white acrylic ink. Rather than just use weathering powders, I wanted to give the vans a more detailed treatment, taking my cue from Martyn Welch's bible on the subject. Many of these vans were long lived, so I wanted to give them a well worn and slightly battered appearance. The key stages were as follows: First add some rust to the [many] metal plates and strapping. When you think about it, rust comes through from below the paint, so using a fine brush I gave all the metalwork a covering with the standard black/bauxite/gunmetal mix. Similarly, I wanted the woodwork to look like the paint was wearing off and that a few individual planks had been replaced, but left unpainted. To represent the latter I carefully painted a few planks with a mix of 'natural wood' and grey [Humbrol 110 and 64]. Other areas were splurged with the same mix and then the vans put aside for a couple of days for this paint to harden. Next I painted over the rusty metal work and worn wood with Humbrol 64 and again left this for a day to harden. Now comes the clever bit from Martyn's book. Using a small glass fibre pencil, you abrade the grey paint covering the rusty metal work, allowing the latter to show through. The other trick is to use plastic solvent - the strong stuff, not DL Lemonine, and dab this onto the overpainted grey areas, which causes this top coat to craze and peel. More work with a craft knife and abrasives ends up with the rust and bare wood appearing underneath. I also used the glass fibre pencil on the lettering - especially the large GS ones, so they likewise look worn and faded. The final two stages involve a wash of the weathering mix over the whole of the bodywork - with heavier applications from the chassis, becoming lighter towards the roof. Once this is dry, a dusting with weathering powders follows - rust for the axle box covers, springs and brakes, then grey over the whole of the body and roof, to tone things down. So, there we are, a longer term project that started with the J19, then the MGWR 'hearse' [both etched kits], followed by the glasshouse brake and the three vans. The final picture shows the train in full, with some close ups of the three new wagons, which hopefully show up the detail and weathering nicely.
    17 points
  48. With limited space, Mullingar needed some form of fiddle yard on a loop behind it. A large terminus station had been in my mind for a long time but the space required put me off. Two things changed this, the excellent Connolly station in N on this site, along with Minories, a design by Cyril Freezer (and we had Fry) which managed an itneresting terminus design with limited space. While ultimately the design of the station throat is not like minories it is nonetheless and interesting track plan! Regardless the idea of Amiens Central is a simple one, the Phoenix Tunnel being regularly used and more Cork bound trains start there. This will allow for a forray into Great Northern and UTA territory while ensuring the heavier locomotives in the fleet have more of an excuse to run. It seems a Schools class will meet the knife to become a VS so there will be a wait before the Rhapsody in Blue.
    16 points
  49. I have slapped a bit of basic colour on this morning to get rid of the 'snow' scene. Hopefully 130 + 127 will draw the viewers attention rather than looking too closely at the paint job.
    16 points
  50. The beet special drops off an empty and picks up a load at Grange. It then proceeds to Glen More where it meets the Cork goods which waits in the loop after finishing its work there.
    16 points
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