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  1. 2 points
  2. DSER Nos. 52 - 54 Built 1893
    2 points
  3. Padraig O'Cuimin "Broadstone Series" drawing. These coaches were re-classified as 1sts in 1914 and re-numbered as 40, 15 & 42
    2 points
  4. Abbeyfeale opened December 1880 and Listowel were the two principal intermediate stations on the Limerick and Kerry Railway (NewcastleWest to Tralee). The station was originally opened with a single passenger platform and a goods loop, a signal box and a second platform with a loop for crossing passenger trains was added in 1881, after which there was little alternation to the station track layout until the Listowel-Ballingarne section of the North Kerry Line closed in November 1975. The track layout is similar to Listowel, Swinford with a long loading bank and goods shed served by a loop arrangement with crossover connections to the running lines that allowed the yard to be shunted by trains in either direction without requiring the loco to run round its train, this arrangement appears to be unique to the former Waterford Limerick and Western Lines. The station was signaled for Up and Down running through the platform roads, the arrangement of crossovers from the running lines to the yard would have allowed Up or Down trains to set out or pick up traffic from the yard with minimal shunting an important consideration when the railway carried perishable and urgent goods traffic by passenger train, individual wagons could be positioned by the loading bank or in the goods shed by shunting horse or by hand. The use of the double crossovers and diamond crossing from the goods yard to running lines may have been to reduce the number of facing points on passenger running lines in the station to an absolute minimum to meet Board of Trade requirements current in the 1880s, the diamond crossing at Listowel was replaced by a pair of crossovers apparently in CIE days which allowed a train from Tralee to run directly into the yard without having to set back. The arrangement of the loop and platforms at the Tralee end of the station was slightly unusual, up trains from Tralee had to take a diverging route into the loop platform, while down trains from Limerick had to pass the signal for entering the section to Listowel in order to occupy the platform or take water as the length of the loop at the Tralee end of the station was restricted by the single track road underbridge. Train services in WLWR & GSWR days appear to have been 3-4 through Limerick passenger trains one of which ran as a mixed mail train with limited passenger accommodation and a daily return goods train over the length of the line which sometimes operated as a mixed on the Listowel-Tralee section. Goods traffic appears to have been mainly local between stations of the Tralee-Limerick line and former Waterford Limerick & Western system, grades over Barnagh on Abbeyfeale-Newcastle West section of the line restricted trains to 25 wagon length without a banking locomotive or 40 maximum with a banker. While through trains appear to have been primarily worked by J15 or 101 Class 0-6-0 in GSR and CIE days, the GSR used ex GSWR 0-4-4T tank locos on an afternoon Limerick-Abbeyfeale local passenger train, the ex-GSWR 0-4-4T had an antique spidery appearance but had a reputation of being fast capable performers. Services were cut back to a single up & down passenger and goods trains under CIE management regular passenger service was discontinued in 1963, special passenger and a daily return Limerick-Tralee goods continued to operate over the line until regular traffic ceased over Barnagh in December 1972. The run down of goods services to Abbeyfeale was gradual, the station was served by a trice weekly service from Tralee from December 1972, although a through Limerick-Abbeyfeale goods was restored briefly while the bridge at the western end of the station was repaired following a bridge strike in May 1973, service from Tralee resumed on completion of the repairs in June 1973. The scheduled goods appears to have been cut back to Listowel at some stage before the Listowel-Ballingarne section closed in October 1975, but the station continued to handle wagon load traffic as required up to closure although there does not appear to be a record of a final Abbeyfeale goods train. The North Kerry continued to handle special passenger trains and operate as a diversionary route (when the line via Killarney was blocked by flooding or landslips) until the line over Barnagh was condemned for passenger traffic in June 1975. Passenger specials included Listowel Race & Educational Specials and Knock Pilgrimage Trains including a 14 Bogie-Abbeyfeale-Knock special which was worked in two portions to Limerick.
    1 point
  5. I thought it would be better to include some examples of station layouts in the resources section than in NIRs Generic Signalling thread in the general discussion section. An example of a small country junction station: Ballingarne County Limerick. To most enthusiasts Ballingarne was the junction between the Limerick-Tralee line and the Foynes Branch although the Limerick and Foynes which opened in 1858 was originally the "main line", the line to Newcastle West opened as an improvished branch line in 1866 the line from Newcastle to Tralee opening in December 1880 and presumably becoming the "main line' There appears to have been relatively little change to the track layout at Ballingarne during its years of operation as a Block Post the main changes appear to be the reversal of the crossover at the Western end of the station depending on whether the Foynes Branch was considered the more important. In 1940 the station was re-signalled and the crossover reversed to allow bi-directional working through both platform roads by North Kerry Trains, Foynes trains using the Up platform road. The station handled tar traffic to a Limerick County Council depot from the early 1960s, the turntable disconnected and the passing loop extended eastward in 1967 in connection with heavy freight traffic on the Foynes line. Although heavy ore and oil trains regularly crossed at Ballingarne it was necessary for one of the trains to perform a shunt as the crossover at the western end of the station was set up for crossing trains on the Tralee line. Ballingarne-Tralee was closed completely in October 1975, Ballingarne closing as a Blockpost in 1988. The diagrams are based on photographs and a diagram in the North Kerry Line by Alan O'Rourke Operation: The Limerick and Foynes, Rathkeale & Newcastle Junction and Limerick and North Kerry railway companies were originally worked by the Waterford & Limerick which was extremely frugal in its operations. At one stage both the Foynes and Newcastle West trains were worked by a single locomotive. A Limerick-Newcastle West-Foynes train would first run directly to Newcastle West the return to the junction then make a side trip to Foynes before returning to Limerick, I am not sure if passengers were expected to wait at Ballingarne while a train made it detour or allowed stay in the train. The Waterford and Limerick became the Waterford Limerick and Western during the 1890s and was absorbed in the the GSWR in 1901, the GSWR & GSR appears to have operated a reasonable service with up to 3 passenger trains and a daily goods in each direction daily. The Foynes trains varied between connecting with the North Kerry train at Ballingarne or running to and from Limerick, in addition the GSR operated an afternoon Limerick-Abbeyfeale return passenger train in addition to the tralee services. Trains were originally operated by W&L & WLWR locos, with the 101 or J15 taking over passenger and goods services as WLWR types were withdrawn, though WLWR & GSWR tank locos appear to have worked the Abbeyfeale train and a Sentinel steam railcar was used on the Foynes Branch during the 1930s. CIE had little interest in passenger traffic on either line, passenger services were cut back to a daily Limerick-Tralee passenger train and a daily mixed to Foynes in CIE days, an AEC railcar set took over Tralee passenger services in the early 50s, few passengers except enthusiasts appear to have used the Foynes mixed in its latter days. A G611 was tried with a MGWR 6w 3rd on the Foynes Mixed the final mixed was hauled by a B101s, the North Kerry goods was officially steam into the early 60s though Crossleys As & Cs appear to have been used, B141 appear to have been the main motive power in "goods only" days, though 213 a re-motored C Class (possibly on layover from Mungnet-Athy bulk cement) worked a Limerick-Abbeyfeale goods in 1973. The run-down of the North Kerry section was gradual following the closure to regular passenger traffic in 1963, the daily Limerick-Tralee goods service was cancelled in 1972 and replaced by trice weekly trip workings from Tralee to Abbeyfeale and Limerick to Newcastle West, Abbeyfeale and Newcastle West lost their regular goods service when sundries traffic went over to road haulage in 1974, a goods continuing to run for wagon load traffic as required, Tralee-Listowel remaining open for goods traffic until January 1977. Special passenger trains continued to operate over the North Kerry until the line was closed in sections during the 1970s, passenger specials continued to operate to Foynes and Ballingarne into the 1980s.
    1 point
  6. DSER Nos. 3, 10, 11, 28, 45 & 46 Built c. 1880s.
    1 point
  7. DSER No. 49, 9, 47, 1, 2, 6 & 7. Built c. 1890s
    1 point
  8. Your content will need to be approved by a moderator Hi, this is not for publication, BUT jhb171achill Gricer Published a really great spreadsheet on post on Prototype Timeline thread By Mr Bob, March 26 in Irish Models Posted July 1, 2015 the latter recently updated post is now on a spread sheet, if i upload the spread sheet my name appears on it, as the software owner, its jbh's and he should be given the credit, so i not uploading it here... if it was a wiki open spreadsheet we could all add to it like pics and who makes what model,,,,,including notes and modelling notes theres a few other really useful resources about this site in outta the way long forgotton posts, if i find and you wish then i can bring them to your attention... spreadsheet by ghb = the following is just a text version CIE – IE Timeline updated Updated timeline with the contributions from members added. Many thanks for the additional information. 1945- CIE formed by amalgamation of the GSR, DUTC and the Grand Canal Company, it was initially a private company. 1946- Announcement that the railway would be converted to diesel traction 1946- D Class 301 5 entered service 1947- Dublin to Belfast Enterprise introduced 1948- Contract with Metropolitan Vickers for 6 twin engined diesel-electric locomotives cancelled but Sulzer had already delivered the engines 1949- 4 Walker diesel Railcars ordered for West Clare (narrow gauge) 1949- Dublin to Cork Enterprise introduced 1949- 60 AEC Railcars ordered 1950- CIE was nationalised as a State Body. 1950- AEC Railcars took over the Enterprise Service 1950-1 B Class 113 2 Sulzers entered service 1953- GNR acquired jointly by Dublin & Belfast Governments GNRB 1954- K Class 800 transferred to CIE on loan for trials but would have remained in GNR ownership (and navy livery) 1955- F Class 501-503 Walker locomotives (Narrow Gauge) entered service 1955-6 A Class 001 60 MV's entered service 1956-7 B Class 101 12 Sulzers entered service using the Sulzer engines first delivered in 1948 1956-7 G Class 601-603 Deutz diesel locomotives entered service 1957-8 E Class 401 19 entered service 1957-8 C Class 201 34 MV's entered service 1958- GNRB stock split to CIE & UTA 1958- K Class 800 renumbered 801 under CIE ownership. 1960-61 Closure of Tramore, West Clare and the former CBSC lines. 1960-2 Introduction of 14 Maybach E Class shunters 1961- Introduction of 15 GM locomotives B121 Class 1961- Passenger Rolling Stock livery changed from Green to Orange/Black 1962- Introduction of 36 GM diesels 141 Class 1962- G Class 611 7 Deutz entered service 1963- All Steam Traction withdrawn 1963- The ‘Flying Snail’ was replaced by the 'Broken Wheel' roundel. Early examples of buses in red/cream or navy/cream still, had Snails for a very, very short time. No Snails ever appeared on black/tan railway stock, nor roundels on green. 1966- 12 GM diesels arrive 181 Class 1967- Closure of the Waterford to Mallow line. 1967- Closure of the Croom Branch (Charleville - Patrickswell); by which stage it just carried the night-time Cork - Limerick goods, having lost its passenger service in '34 1967- Closure of the Thurles 1968-72 MV A & C Class re-engined with GM Motors 1972-3 72 AC Coaches from BR Engineering introduced in the new 'Supertrain' services 1973- AEC Stock had engines removed and used in Pull-Push configurations 1975- Last ever Cattle Trains ran, Loughrea to Cabra. 1975- On 3rd November that year, the Loughrea line was closed, and with it the last mixed trains in Ireland. 1975- On 3rd November the Burma Road and the Ardee branch closed. 1977- 18 new GM locomotives, 071 Class enter service 1984- First of the new Mark 3 coaches went into service, 'Intercity' branded. 1984- DART begins operating 1987- Logo change from CIE to 'IR' (Irish Rail) 1987- Last 24 Mark 3's adapted for Suburban work modified for Pull-Push using 121 Class 1987- 3 80 Class Railcar Sets leased from NIR for 3 years 1990- 15 BR Mark2a coaches brought from Vic Berry, Leicester, refitted in Inchicore entered service 1994- 32 201 Class GM locomotives arrive to replace the 001 Class. 1994- 16 new Railcars arrive from Tokyn -'Arrows' 2600 Class 1994- Logo change from IR to IE (Iarnrod Eireann) 1994- Two 201's went to NIR for the joint Enterprise Service 1997- New De Deitrich coaches introduced to the Enterprise service 1998-9 26 Spanish built 2700 Class arrived 'Sparrows' 1998-9 10 new DART Units entered service 2000- Delivery of DART Class 8500 2001- 2800 Class enters service 2001- Delivery of DART Class 8510 2003-4 2900 Class enters service 2003- Delivery of DART Class 8520 2007- 22000 Class enters service 2011-12 Second batch of 22000 Class enter service 2013- New "Iarnród Éireann Irish Rail" logo introduced 2014- Enterprise refurbishment announced, with 8209 receiving partial livery 2014- Class 22000 have formal approval for cross-border work, starting by covering an Enterprise Set for refurbishment 2014-15 Belmond (Rail Tour Company) start moving their Mark 3's to Scotland for refurbishment. Last Mark 3 movement in orange/black 2015- Top and Tail working now permitted with HOBS wagons 2015- Single Line Working and Ballast Cleaning, finally using 781 to its full potential 2015 - 206 repainted in full Enterprise livery and MMI screens fitted
    1 point
  9. Standard design of open wagon and vans introduced by the Irish Railway Clearing House during WW1. Naturally the MGWR had a "convertible" type of the van in addition to the hard topped variety. The IRCH open was the standard Irish open wagon up to the introduction of the corrugated opens by CIE in the 1950s The IRCH covered wagon was the standard on the GNR until the boards assets were divided between CIE & the UTA in the 1950s.
    1 point
  10. Used for goods and livestock traffic the standard MGWR covered wagon up to the introduction of the Irish Railway Clearing House vans during WW1. Some lasted into the mid-late 1950s
    1 point
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