Jump to content

NIR lineside

Rate this topic


jhb171achill
 Share

Recommended Posts

3 hours ago, DoctorPan said:

Yeah, markers to denote areas of Japanese Knotweed.  Here's the Irish Rail equivalent taken on a lineside walk during a site visit this summer.

 

 

20210705_114552.thumb.jpg.988f64b203e0fbe7140fe66ac5bed380.jpg

Bit of an over kill wah?, The must love spending cash, How much to install that instead of dealing with the plant itself.

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Georgeconna said:

Bit of an over kill wah?, The must love spending cash, How much to install that instead of dealing with the plant itself.

 

That's installed while they are dealing with it. Takes about 7-8 years to completely remove the plant and its root system. It's classified as "controlled waste" so it's an absolute pain to get rid of, as if not done properly, just spreads it around the place

  • Like 1
  • Agree 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's hard stuff to stop. I've had dealings with a patch on the Big Island, allegedly exterminated over a few years before my time, but it kept appearing again for another five or six years, requiring a weekly inspection and instant hit, if any poked up. Sometimes months would pass before it decided to risk it - it's been over two years now since the last appearance, but I'm still not convinced it's really over.

Luckily, that patch was in the centre of a very large garden - if it's on both sides of a border, it can get very 'political'.

  • Like 2
  • Agree 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It flew up the Cambrian coast when the new masts for the improved radio signalling was installed - likely little bits of plant on a road vehicle or a boot or two . less than 6mm of the stem contains enough DNA for it to reproduce and spread. Burning does nothing , robust cutting knocks it back and then the buried waste 3m down survives.  Nasty chemicals pour down stems and into ground around over a 8 - 10 year period seems to do the trick- nasty invasive stuff and NR does a little bit half arsed and not followed up .  

Not sure what part it plays in any food chain so possible to eradicate I guess but then to be followed by ... Budlia seems a likely candidate with uncontrolled spreading on the trackside with ineffective cutback over root ball removal- I guess nobody cares enough to lead a good clean up, but it shows nature will win out.   Worse of course it was used by railways to support embankments due to its vast root networks , self inflicted pain....  

  

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Terms of Use