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New arrivals from Silver Fox this morning, a CIE open third and corridor composite. They will provide much needed variety in the passenger fleet and it will now be possible to run two passenger trains on the layout with no two vehicles alike which was so typical of CIE in the sixties and early seventies.

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3 minutes ago, StevieB said:

The new coaches from Silver Fox really are rather nice, although I must get round to addressing the fact that some of the  internal compartments don’t line up with the windows. How’s the foot coming along?

Stephen

 

17 hours ago, patrick said:

New arrivals from Silver Fox this morning, a CIE open third and corridor composite. They will provide much needed variety in the passenger fleet and it will now be possible to run two passenger trains on the layout with no two vehicles alike which was so typical of CIE in the sixties and early seventies.

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Yummie, they look fabulous especially in those surroundings. Must order some to go with my B&T stock. SF have raised their game. Now its possible along with SF & IFM & MM and soon IRM's A classes to model the 1950s, 60s and 70s properly. IMHO, the zenith era of Irish Railways, when men were men, trains were trains, and shunting was the norm before yoyos. :) As ever your layout looks excellent Patrick. Just oozes atmosphere provoking the mind to elicit memories of sounds, sights and smells of that halcyon era.

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Agreed Noel Silver Fox have raised their game with these models. Of course they don't have the level of detail of recent RTR Irish models but they are well finished and look the part. My approach to the hobby is as a layout builder concerned about the big picture rather than the detail on individual models. A prototypical consist of well finished models which look the part and pass the two foot rule is far more preferable than a unlikely consist of finely detailed models. I'm sure a touch of weathering would work wonders on the models. 

I spoke with John at Silver Fox recently and he mentioned that the Sulzer mould was being updated and suggested the front end will receive attention. It would be wonderful to have a use for all those surplus SF A class underframes once the IRM model is here.

Regarding the foot Noel. Its good news bad news, the bad, following a surgical procedure on my right great toe an infection set in which spread to the bone and after months of dressing changes and IV antibiotics and keeping the foot elevated it was amputated.  I broke the foot in question about 10 years ago in three places and there is a lot of metal implanted in there. Had the infection spread I could have lost the whole foot. The good news is I'm recovering and will be able to return to normal and be back on my feet with appropriate footware Considering I am 61 years old and have been a diabetic since I was 26 I consider myself lucky. 

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Patrick.

Firstly, sorry to hear about the foot issues - I hope that you continue to fully recover.

Yes, I agree that John's SF coaches are certainly improving - makes you wonder why people want more when he does quite a variety?

Now, naturally I loved the beet train - nice wagons, well built from our kits - shows they travel well? I'm happy to say any of you who want some (as kits) can have them as I have recently built my stock up.

Keep well, Patrick and keep modelling!

Leslie

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Thanks Leslie, now that I'm back on my feet, literally, but will not be ready to return to work for a while yet I'm spending some time on the layout. Speaking of the beet wagons I am currently engaged in weathering a bunch of them. The method I use is first to paint them using a medium grey automotive spray primer. Allowing time for the paint to dry the model is then liberally sprayed all over with a mixture of very dilute black poster paint with a few drops of dish washing liquid. A soft brush is used to work the "grime" into the crevices. The model is then allowed to dry placed upside down so the grime mix won't pool in the interior leaving unrealistic water marks. The procedure is repeated if necessary until a pleasing effect is achieved. Excess grime can be removed with a soft brush and water. When dry the axlebox area gets a light brushing of the same black poster paint to represent oil. When dry the entire model recieves an overall drybrushing of white poster paint. The rust is a grease paint received from our neighbour Bruce who runs disaster preparedness exercises and uses it to simulate wounds! He suggested using it when  I asked him if he had any rust coloured chalk. A little goes a long way here and of course prototype photos should be consulted every step of the way. I will post some photos later today.

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Thanks, Patrick, for the lesson - simple of effective!

I'll send you a very polite request for permission to use it on my website.

It looks a lot better (!) than a clean wagon - oh, was that crash my friends (who know I like clean trains) falling over?

Leslie

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14 hours ago, patrick said:

Thanks Leslie, now that I'm back on my feet, literally, but will not be ready to return to work for a while yet I'm spending some time on the layout. Speaking of the beet wagons I am currently engaged in weathering a bunch of them. The method I use is first to paint them using a medium grey automotive spray primer. Allowing time for the paint to dry the model is then liberally sprayed all over with a mixture of very dilute black poster paint with a few drops of dish washing liquid. A soft brush is used to work the "grime" into the crevices. The model is then allowed to dry placed upside down so the grime mix won't pool in the interior leaving unrealistic water marks. The procedure is repeated if necessary until a pleasing effect is achieved. Excess grime can be removed with a soft brush and water. When dry the axlebox area gets a light brushing of the same black poster paint to represent oil. When dry the entire model recieves an overall drybrushing of white poster paint. The rust is a grease paint received from our neighbour Bruce who runs disaster preparedness exercises and uses it to simulate wounds! He suggested using it when  I asked him if he had any rust coloured chalk. A little goes a long way here and of course prototype photos should be consulted every step of the way. I will post some photos later today.

That weathering looks superb. well done

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On 13/2/2021 at 10:27 AM, patrick said:

Although it's been a few years since I completed the 12 Bulleid opens the weathering didnt get finished until today. I couldn't resist stringing all of them togeather and admiring them on the layout. Next step is to load half of them and stage them on the layout for operation.

The video reminds me of being stopped at Coolmine Crossing by a Tuam-Dundalk empty beet special on my way home from work in the in Autumn/Winter of 1983/4. It was a treat to see a long loose coupled goods as opposed to the passenger workings common (relatively) on the Sligo Line.

 

 

 

 

 

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Patrick, 

It is good to see the recuperation has worked wonders and I hope in the nearest of futures you are back to full mobility. 

The wagon works and weathering are great and tips filled in grey matter- if I can find them again of course !!

The short videos are brilliant fun to watch and thanks for putting them up for us on the forum.   

Take care and stay safe at this strange time

Robert     

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Great stuff, Patrick. I don't need a website any more, I'll just give callers the link to your thread!

Nice to see the little Bulleid Flat in a train - you'll have to get a baler, or the like, as a load?

Made my day, almost as much as watching my two year old granddaughter singing Happy Birthday (to herself!).

Leslie

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On 15/2/2021 at 2:33 AM, Mayner said:

 

My level crossing beet train memories involve watching the loaded train on cold winter evenings while stopped with my bicycle at the Edward Street crossing in Tralee. As I remember it an empty train of about 40 wagons would arrive in Tralee in the early hours of the morning and run into the North Kerry yard. A morning run would be made to Abbeydorney then a run to Fenit about mid day then another return trip to Abbeydorney in the afternoon. Occasionally wagons of beet pulp would be in the train. I was fortunate enough that the train crews knew me and allowed me to travel with them on the Fenit and the evening run to Abbeydorney on a number of occasions as a teenager.  At Fenit the crew would adjourn to the pub by the station there for refreshments! On returning to Tralee the loaded wagons would be assembled into a train in the North Kerry yard for Mallow or Thurles, I'm not sure which at the time. Today the North Kerry yard is a Dunnes Stores and its car park, rails no longer cross Edward Street and train service to Tralee is provided entirley by rail cars. As for teenage train fans, sadly such access is no longer there.

On 15/2/2021 at 2:33 AM, Mayner said:

 

 

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3 hours ago, Robert Shrives said:

And no pub for the crews these days - where has all the fun gone! The price of progress and a great memory to share. 

Robert 

The late Harry Mulholland, former Knockmore Junction (GNR) signalman, who some of us here will have known, used to tell the story of being sent by the Lisburn signalman when was a junior there, across the road to get the driver and fireman of a train of sand out of the Robin’s Nest bar. The train had been looped in Lisburn for a while due to a loco failure, and the crew left a youth in charge of the cripple while they went for a “cure”!

When the relief engine appeared, let’s just say the fireman drove it to Crumlin while the driver snored loudly on the coal pile....

And then there was Castlegregory Junction!

The late GSWR loco man Billy Lohan also told me several other tales of similar ilk. Cattle fair days brought specials into many towns, and the crew might nip off for a few while the “beasts” were being loaded!

Billy was a “vehement teetotaller” and very strongly disapproved of the very IDEA of bars! He would have banned alcohol outright given the opportunity....

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My father has a few similar tales from UTA byways in the early 60s....and only yesterday I read about the late Billy Steenson of York Road shed who was set a challenge on his turn driving the 1740 to Ballymena. Two pints were set beside the water tower at Ballymena, and would be removed at 1810.....

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A friend of mine drives the Javelin high speed commuter units and is not allowed to drink for 48 hours before going on duty and gets regularly tested. Just as well really, when they go up to 140mph. That said, once on the North Kent line, these racers actually become all station stoppers - bit of a waste somehow. However, also tells me that Channel Tunnel drivers could potentially get away with all sorts of things as the locos are pretty much fully automatic.

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When  beer was safer than local water  you can understand drinking a weak brew was very common. Water standards in parts of the world have improved so no need for the pales and browns of old, now with designer beers and largers that are strong enough to rot the pipes then the ban on rail transport and limitations on road are essential protections for those buying tickets with the expectation of a safe arrival.   Random and post incident testing now also covers drugs does make you wonder where it all went so wrong. At least railway modelling and Patrick`s evocation of a better simpler time allow some balance!   

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Indeed - we can look back on stories of old, but I don’t think anyone would seriously advocate going back to those days.

Public safety was taken less seriously, and workers’ safety likewise. It’s frustrating to oul wans like me who remember happily wandering all round goods yards with shunting in progress and main line trains going past, with nary a steel-capped boot, hi-viz clothing, or PTS in tow, but obviously it’s better the way it is today.

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