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Posted (edited)

They would definitely be more interesting than a 1970s Mark 2 set. Those always seemed boringly BR to me and the Hunslets looked so much like a BR 'Western' too (though the photo of the blue Hunslet with white/blue stripe Mark 2s at Derry is giving me nostalgia now). My home ground would have been BR blue, urban, high/low level, electrified - I even heard someone being electrocuted - so I found the whole NIR experience fascinating.

Edited by NIR

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Posted (edited)

Of course no NIR (NCC) layout could be complete without one of these totally utilitarian lineside huts

IMG_20190524_151600.thumb.jpg.9c73989d1291741d9c12d6d31446fc86.jpg

Single-skin brickwork, metal-framed windows and a corrugated pent roof - and such little architectural merit they actually have architectural merit.

One of these seemed to be passed every couple of miles, I'm assuming they are for PW or maybe a ground frame, this one looks like it might have had telegraph wires* into it via the bracket above the window.

This is heavily cropped from a Diesel Dawn/JM Allen photo, does anyone know of other photos?

* and there's another detail to model, poles leaning this way and that

Edited by NIR

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They were used also as shelters for PW gangs out’n’about.

As you say, very distinctive. The NCC (and the GNR as far as some bridges were concerned) were early pioneers using concrete, though these brick things were common.

In contrast to the very beautiful and distinctive architectural style of the Belfast & Northern Counties, in particular the work of Berkeley Dean Wise, the NCC’s own designs were truly awful!

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On 5/24/2019 at 3:29 PM, NIR said:

Of course no NIR (NCC) layout could be complete without one of these totally utilitarian lineside huts

IMG_20190524_151600.thumb.jpg.9c73989d1291741d9c12d6d31446fc86.jpg

Single-skin brickwork, metal-framed windows and a corrugated pent roof - and such little architectural merit they actually have architectural merit.

One of these seemed to be passed every couple of miles, I'm assuming they are for PW or maybe a ground frame, this one looks like it might have had telegraph wires* into it.

This is heavily cropped from a Diesel Dawn/JM Allen photo, does anyone know of other photos?

* and there's another detail to model, poles leaning this way and that

Maybe it was just the Larne line but I also remember these with arched corrugated  roofs? Certainly passed one every day between Greenisland and  Jordanstown adjacent to the Up line. Roy Carlisle and Ian Sinclair’s books (which I don’t have access to right now or I’d look!) may help with pics.  

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3 hours ago, Robert Shrives said:

Great photos - is it me or is the road signal head for the crossing turned away from the road?

Robert

It's the 70s, the photographer is inside the barriers!

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I took pictures up signal posts, on tracks in front of (very slowly!) moving trains, either side of whatever very few notices or barriers there were, and wandered around Connolly and Heuston stations among the tracks, and so on.

Unacceptable nowadays, but very much the norm back in the day.

We drunk and drove routinely then too, and smoked in restaurants and on buses and trains.

I survived!

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Hi 

Thanks - yes well corrected it is the off side set looking "up the road" from within the crossing "envelope."  I watched some forward facing cctv of a voyager set running in Scotland where the train missed a cyclist by inches and train was doing 80mph!

So yes we survived but not all do it has to be said, still a good shot of a basic but practical shed.

cheers

Robert 

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Posted (edited)
On ‎3‎/‎27‎/‎2019 at 11:16 AM, NIR said:

So it's a shunting puzzle without the puzzle! I'm happy with that...

Shortly after writing that I realised it was all a very BIG puzzle...

With platform, loop and fiddle yard all of 2 foot nominal length there is nowhere for the tightly-fitting freight and passenger services to actually cross. If the passenger remains at the platform the freight cannot run around but if the passenger crosses the freight then the freight cannot pull back to set into the siding!

So that is why it is now a through station

 

trackplantraverser.thumb.jpg.2ca654667d0fbd7cc72f525771f15d6b.jpg

The passenger can now continue onto the traverser on the right rather than blocking the sector plate to the left, the freight pulls into the loop then runs around and pulls back onto the sector plate before propelling into the siding.

But there is still a problem, a passenger service can not come and go freely unless the freight dwells somewhere on the layout. The easy answer is a double-track traverser to hold the freight, but freight approaches from the left so I need to configure some massively complicated sector-traverser on the left using a finely-engineered slot to cam the disengage/traverse movement of two sector plates (probably...)

My easy solution, assume the freight arrives from the left early morning then runs around and propels, the passenger comes and goes all day as desultory shunting movements take place, then the freight departs to the left late evening. It even sounds prototypical.

I wonder though, has anyone ever seen or heard of a traversing sector plate? With the pivot being so close to the exit (the crossover and tracks actually represent the two positions of a single-track sector plate) a second track on the same sector plate has to intersect the existing track at that point (the crossover becomes an actual crossover) so adding complexity and compromising its useful length. I expect one solution is to place the crossover near centred across the join and then cut it, but that seems to be inviting trouble (and would only shorten the loop by the same amount the sector track length was preserved).

Edited by NIR

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Reading through Parting Shot I am surprised and delighted to realise that an MPD set had no intermediates! If it wasn't a power car (or a restaurant) then it was a driving trailer. Now that is definitely a model that can be built up and multiplied over time...

Edited by NIR
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