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Project 42 Update

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On 3/15/2019 at 10:46 AM, WaYSidE said:

how did they get the beet out? no way could any forklift get into the corners of the wagons. i must ask the locals

 

Sugar beet was literally washed out of trucks and railway wagons using a water canon at the factories.

May be some clips of beet being unloaded in the RTE archive, used to be on the 9 0 Clock news nearly every year in the 70s & 80s.

The water canon/jets were mounted on a steel structure in the unloading area, at Mallow in its final years trucks were unloaded during the day and trains at night

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The bullied corrugated open wagons commonly referred to as 'beet' wagons were originally just general purpose open goods wagons built by the thousands but late in their careers used for the transport of sugar beet in what was referred to as single beet wagons, later the bodies assembled one on top of the other to form the double beet wagons on a different chassis. The open bullied wagons were used for transporting all manner of other goods and general merchandise including sacked agri products, bags, barrels, loose bulk materials, small containers, boxes, timber, tyres, cable drums, builders materials, etc. Along with H-Vans they dominated Irish goods train traffic from the 1950s until the early 1970s before the freight modernisation program kicked in heralding the arrival of container traffic, folk lift trucks, pallet wagons of various types, bogie wagons and uniform block trains that were fitted with brakes doing away with the iconic brake vans which used to be seen at the end of all goods trains formations. In the 1960s these open wagons were seen everywhere on the rail network and filled sidings in virtually every station they were the corner stone of what we now call freight traffic.

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Posted (edited)
11 hours ago, Mayner said:

Sugar beet was literally washed out of trucks and railway wagons using a water canon at the factories.

May be some clips of beet being unloaded in the RTE archive, used to be on the 9 0 Clock news nearly every year in the 70s & 80s.

The water canon/jets were mounted on a steel structure in the unloading area, at Mallow in its final years trucks were unloaded during the day and trains at night

The facility for unloading at Mallow used the same system (Water canons) which is still used in Switzerland. I have uploaded a video of the unloading operation at Aarberg; one of 2 Swiss Beet processing facilities which are still in use today.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/irishswissernie/46824251314/in/dateposted-public/

The Swiss not being in the EEC and therefore not subject to their decisions ,didn't have to decimate their Sugar Beet industry some 14 years ago and the industry still produces around a million tons of beets the majority of which is railed to the plants for processing.

In addition the waste material or Zaf is often railed back for fertiliser and the refined sugar forwarded by rail.

Beet wagons are just the standard bogie EAOS open which outside the Beet season can be used for a multitude of different loads.

Ernie

Somewhat off TOPIC, apologies!

Edited by Irishswissernie
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22 hours ago, Irishswissernie said:

 

The Swiss not being in the EEC and therefore not subject to their decisions ,didn't have to decimate their Sugar Beet industry some 14 years ago and the industry still produces around a million tons of beets the majority of which is railed to the plants for processing.

 

Funnily enough EU don't seem to have been impressed with Greencore decision to close the plant.

 https://www.irishtimes.com/news/sugar-factory-closure-needless-1.867073

Potentially looks like the closure was driven more by a windfall of EU compensation and potential profit from selling the site at the height of the property boom, than a EU poilicy decision.

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Hi everyone,

Now that the ploughs have arrived the A is motoring along in the tooling shop, and more bubbles are on the way, you may have been wondering about the 'forgotten child' of the IRM stable, the 42ft project. 

We had hoped to begin releases of the 42ft flat range on a staggered basis from late 2018 onwards, but we underestimated by a tad (okay, a lot!) how long the project would take to fully tool and design. The fertilizer wagon in particular was a challenge to get right and to a state that we were happy with. Tooling the project had to take place together to ensure the best fit and finish and compatibility between loads. This meant that tooling took a long. long time to complete. 

However, as the below pictures will show, tooling is finally almost at an end! 

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We are due our first samples within the next two weeks, and should they be up to scratch then we will push ahead with the liners straight into production. We can expect them into stock in July, all going well.

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We will launch the fert wagon for preorder once we are happy with the samples and know that production is getting closer, with an accurate release date in place. So, watch this space! 

Thanks to all of you who have ordered liner packs so far, and we look forward to landing them here in the coming weeks. As soon as we have samples, we will post them here and on our website!

Cheers,

Fran

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Tooling looks good and trying to work in reverse I think I can see spray tank, spoil sprues and the basic chassis shape , plenty to keep you busy and expensive of course as others have found !   5th pic righthand I guess is part of floor with bogie centres and brake details - all very clever, looking forward to ferts being on the order pages soon - even if the wallet might not !

thanks gents and keep up the good work..

Robert    

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I really love seeing this side of the process it makes me appreciate the finished product all the more. 

Rich,

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Can't wait for the ferts to come. Childhood memories of them passing through Killagan level crossing heading for Londonderry. 

Great times for Irish modellers continue. 

Class 80 please!  

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It's amazing how they make those moulds, it's a real art.

Having a few time delays is ok, it gives us more time to save up. :-bd

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Thanks for the update gents,

I see the lads at Limerick wagon works have beaten you to it-they unveiled their "Weathered" version last Sunday....😋

 

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