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10 minutes ago, Angus said:

Hi Brothie, 

I did wonder if that might be the case but hoppers look higher than the front of the porch. It might just be an optical illusion in the photo mind.

I'll have to spend some time looking at the historical photos.

Yeah, it certainly isn't much of a fall, and if there isn't one, then that's not the answer.

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Puzzle sorted.

In this extract from the video slideshow on the Dromahair Heritage site (https://dromahairheritage.wordpress.com/2018/04/27/s-l-n-c-r-and-dromahair-station/#comments) the detail can just be seen.

image.png.2d8527ffc3c274e71be485a0c7d9c2f6.png

There is a better quality picture in Neil Spinks's SL&NCR Pictorial book.

The gutter falls toward the porch then drop down in a series of two bends into the hopper.

I bet they were a bugger to keep clear of leaf fall!

Edited by Angus
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Fantastic ! I land back in the UK to find that the mystery of Dromahair’s downpipes has been sorted as I crossed the channel! The link is one I really like, not so much for the pictures as the text. It’s the best account I have ever read of the typical freight flow through a small Irish station. Looking at the site, one of the other recent stories on the blog describes the country school near Dromahair that my mother attended!

Edited by Galteemore
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It's like David says

The porch roof looks like a lead or copper sheeted roof, the up-stands along the front eaves- is the detail one uses to join the sheets! the roof falls to the rear against the station building wall which would have a gutter or flat surface laid at a fall towards the rain water pipe, this gutter discharges into a hopper just below the roof covering and fixed to the fascia then through the double bends and down to ground. The rain water pipe from the roof above discharges onto the porch roof and carried from there into the hopper.

To do this detail correctly one should carry the roof finish- ie; a lead flashing , up the station wall approx 150mm scale height above the porch roof to weather the station wall and form the back of the porch roof gutter.

1575280002_GutterDetail-00.jpg.3146ee7fbdb8129f53c1f126906b71fe.jpg

Eoin

 

Edited by murrayec

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Following on from a trial scribing the foam to represent rough cut stone I've done the first wall.

This is just scribed foam covered in a black wash. I need to dry brush some lighter greys and browns to introduce more subtly to the colouring. The top surface in particular needs considerably lighting.

None the less I am pleased with the effect so far.

1921942786_Platformwall2.thumb.jpg.f337163a3e026f32c94e49ab05d0ec8b.jpg

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Looks great, i would tone down the white bits a bit and very little else. :tumbsup:

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Thanks both.

The black wash was just to exaggerate the scribing prior to painting.

I was surprised how effective it looked although in reality it does look a little stark and in need of some tone and more colour.

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More stone scribing over the weekend has got all the platform faces complete and the rear platform wall.

There's still the wall at the back of the Goods loading bay but I'm going to wait until the goods shed is done so I can get the tie-in position right.

I've then been over the stones with some washes of paint, particularly the platform edging which shows up lighter than the platform surface in most photos.

To try and tone down the starkness I added some sienna yellow in at the end to give a bit of warmth.

  818079009_Platformdone2.thumb.jpg.39350a4e4768e00708a742e87450f84a.jpg

The stones are a bit over-scale when compared to photo s but these are the smallest I can physically scribe.

I've also printed the station signboard and backed on some 10 thou plastic.

232722127_StationSign.thumb.jpg.ea0c0258a0131adbb919e06117c5552b.jpg

 

I've only found one decent photo of the sign, which I would guess dates form the 30s, 

1721587485_DromahiarstationwithRailcar.jpg.9439077069e3f3f9ca42b3cf28f672c8.jpg

 

Next up I need to paint the sleepers and install the point rodding in prior to ballasting.

Rather surprisingly for the SLNCR, the photos do seem to indicate the presence of ballast at Dromahair"

 

Edited by Angus
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Another thought - is scribing really necessary? Even in 7mm scale, it is arguable that brickwork is best represented by printed, rather than embossed, paper, let alone scribing DAS clay. If mortar lines are around 2mm deep, then when reduced by 1/43rd, that equates to around 0.05mm, so in 2mmFS, that will be barely 0.01mm, or 10 microns!

 However, it is also arguable that sometimes we need to exaggerate certain features, in order to make them appear more realistic - artistic licence, as it were.

 Overall though, for quite a few aspects, across the scales, it is worth considering whether they are better represented by a printed sheet, rather than scribing lots of fine lines - it can save quite a bit of time and still look just as effective from the normal viewing distance of 60-100cm away.

 Having said all that, I will still be scribing stones and bricks when I build my new coal stage, but there are times when I find myself thinking 'do I really need to go to all that trouble, or is there a quicker, simpler way?'

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Hi David,

It's an interesting point you raise. I'm not a big fan of brick paper. It looks great in photos but always looks too flat when viewed with naked eye.

That said, having used embossed plastic in the past , this doesn't give a good representation either. In future I'm intending to switch to brick paper as it allows more variety of coursing.

For stonework the texture is more important. For well dress stone brick paper would suffice, for any other stone then I feel the texture is more important than absolute scale courses.

As with all things it comes down to personal preference and balance.

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I think balance is the crucial word here. As long as the approach to the entire layout and scene is balanced it works. Planting a resin made building next to a card kit will almost always jar - consistency is key. As long as the same genre of materials and styles is used throughout, the scene is more likely to blend 

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Out of curiosity when I was a teenager (many, many, many moons ago, when the world was black'n'tan and steam was just about dying) I gathered some very small stone gravel from a beach, with the intention of putting it through Senior's old sand sieve, to extract the smallest pieces. The intention was to select small stones to build a stone wall on my (first) layout out of the natural materials.

As you will guess, it was an exceptionally tedious and lengthy process, and matching up the right-looking tiny little bits would have tried the patience of ten saints. However, while I never progressed further than the scale equivalent of a ten-foot-long length of wall, it looked well, and no artificial thing can come close. But it certainly knocked my next proposed projects straight on the head, which would have been to build a small stone cottage to put in a field at the corner of the layout. I'd still be at it......

I have been thinking more about that lately, perhaps to make a derelict stone gable wall of something like an old famine ruin in one of the fields near "Dugort Harbour". Maybe, if I've nothing better to do some winter.

There used to be some firm who made little plastic bricks and coping stones and stuff like that - is this still about, does anyone know?

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It was a firm called Linka, basically you cast your own parts in a mould using some powdery stuff mixed with water. This is the company who seem to have taken over from the original firm.

https://www.scalecast.co.uk/linka-moulds.html#/

I experimented with the idea but adapting the bits/castings produced with a bit of scratch building. Below is one I made earlier (well some 39 years earlier!) I think I sold it many years ago. 4mm scale

885051705_GoodswarehousemadefromLinkaearly1980simg485.thumb.jpg.cf9f352c6825536175e0b1ebd85f9dab.jpg

Edited by Irishswissernie
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Linka - now there is a blast from the past....i think the moulds are still somewhere in my folks attic...

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A bit more progress at Dromahair.

The yard has ballast down although I do need to add some static grass which should add a dash of much needed colour, and Mrs Hamilton's chickens are obligatory!

Thge sleepers have all been painted a light tan/grey colour to represent aged wood although I think a couple of washes with some dark grey is needed to tone down the effect.

1741694913_yardballast.thumb.jpg.b64e101e91230b551ffb3db062785570.jpg

I've also got the signal box stonework done. No masochistic scribing this time just Ration embossed sheets. 

I still need to add the quoin stones, this will completed using thin plastic.

405829542_Signalboxbase.thumb.jpg.fa57c1133ce71bc462fbc63632c5f865.jpg

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Having just invested in a ratio signal box interior the question has to be asked, how many levers at the Dromahair box?

 

1908044980_DromahairStationmap.thumb.JPG.a4f88bfca3c1dc1c7304c14f75ca84b0.JPG

Counting the signals on the Enniskillen side we have four signals visible in this photo from Ernie's Railway archive

Dromahair @Lough Erne' shunting 7may57 SLNC c929

The signal on the horizon having two arms (as seen in the photo below from the John J Smith collection held by the Bluebell Railway)

http://www.bluebell-railway-museum.co.uk/archive/photos/jjs/b06/6-92-8.htm

The strangely painted lower arm provided the signal to the driver that the crossing has been set for the goods yard when a train was to be set back into the yard to clear the mainline for another train.

At the Sligo end there are two signals as seen in another photo from the JJS collection

http://www.bluebell-railway-museum.co.uk/archive/photos/jjs/b06/6-93-6.htm

So that's six levers so far.

The crossover for the entry into the goods yard appears to be worked from a single run of point rodding so would account for another lever (the crank is behind the annoying placed gentleman in the above photo from Ernie's).  I also think there two runs of rodding running east so I'm guessing a facing point lock operated by a separate lever (or did the SL&NCR use economical FPLs?).

So we are now up to eight levers.

There is another run of rodding running west just visible in this photo from the transport of delight website

Railcar B - built in 1947 by Walkers Bros. of Wigan. The power bogie was articulated to the saloon on true Irish fashion, unusually it could be driven from either end and could seat 59 passengers. It was very popular and successful, costing only a fraction of what a steam loco cost to run - on closure in 1957, it was sold to CIE and renumbered No.2509, seeing use on crew training duties from 1964 and serving on the Nenagh branch in the early 1970's - seen here at Dromahair.

 

In truth I am not sure what this is for, it seems to run to the level crossing gates.

As there was a crossing keeper at Dromahair responsible for the gates I am presuming these weren't operated from the box. So I am presuming this is a locking lever for the gates?

Finally the JJS collection gives a view of a distant signal at Dromahair, presumably there would be one of these in each direction?

http://www.bluebell-railway-museum.co.uk/archive/photos/jjs/b01/1-57-3.htm

This brings the tally of levers to eleven, so say twelve with one spare.

Finally I am presuming that the lever colours would follow standard  UK practice (although I suspect anything is possible with the SL&NCR) of red for a stop signal, yellow for a distance signal, blue for a facing point lock, brown for the crossing gates lock and black for points?

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3 hours ago, Angus said:

Finally I am presuming that the lever colours would follow standard  UK practice (although I suspect anything is possible with the SL&NCR) of red for a stop signal, yellow for a distance signal, blue for a facing point lock, brown for the crossing gates lock and black for points?

 

 

This was indeed standard in Ireland, or possibly “standard”!

I’m unaware of any exceptions though I won’t swear there weren’t any!

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