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51 minutes ago, Angus said:

As I was placing an order with Shapeways I also took the plunge and bought the MGWR brake 3rd carraige that has been the subject of some discussion in another topic on this site.

Buying it lessened the pain of Shapeways postage costs.

As it arrived:-

1822443242_MGWRbrakethirdclear.thumb.jpg.afd000e690669d38254f9a2ea9fe7110.jpg

In this form the plastic is quite soft and there is still some of the support wax present. Following advice of others (I had done this before) I scrubbed the surface with a toothbrush and washing up liquid before dunking the body in a bath of white spirit for an hour. Left overnight the body turns white. It is now quite hard and easier to sand. You can also see the surface clearly to work on.

186511718_MGWRbrakethirdwhite.thumb.jpg.569b7ac74705d8e32f658ab9d4fd603b.jpg

The body appears dimensionally correct and captures the lines of the carriage well the buffers seem a bit over scale (a scale 18" across the face) but easily replaced with some turned ones from N-Brass.

As I feared though the surface striation is quite bad.

1885950432_MGWRbrakethirdsides.thumb.jpg.a5c4c14edcecc1e186a0534ca7052108.jpg260370378_MGWRbrakethirdroof.thumb.jpg.ed439fb0d7085bb5d0e96c4f06da34b7.jpg 

Without care I'll be losing a lot of the side detail. The doors will need re-scribing at the very least. Please bare in mind this is 2mm scale, in larger scale the striation will appear less worse.

 

3 minutes ago, Andy Cundick said:

Hate to say it the striation is just as bad in 4mm i've got one sitting on the workbench at the moment a good argument for etched brass i'm afraidespecially as its sharing the workbench with a rake of Worsley DNGR 6 wheelers.Andy. 

Although I dislike making negative comments, I have to concur.

This particular manufacturer has many items listed that I would be most interested in. However, a couple of years ago I ordered some narrow gauge War Department Class D bogie wagons for an Ashover Light Railway layout project. The models when they arrived were terribly striated and the surface details were very poorly defined.

Unfortunately, this supplier's models seem to only be available in one single type of material, which I've been informed isn't ideal for fine detail, and so I've made a conscious decision to not order from him again.

Kind regards,

Mark

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Likewise, I agree.

Many small manufacturers need our support, and even if an offering isn't truly perfect, best to be careful about just slagging them off.

I had investigated these things too - if they were half decent I'd have half a dozen of the 2nd & 3rd class equivalents of the above. But they're very rough indeed - and I had been advised this by others. A pity, because as you say they have some nice stuff.

I have an interest in various foreign railways too, and Shapeways do some items from these which would also have interested me, but even their illustrations show they're too coarse. I'll make no further comment on them, as I am conscious that to some they're OK, and it's a free world!

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1 hour ago, 2996 Victor said:

 

Although I dislike making negative comments, I have to concur.

This particular manufacturer has many items listed that I would be most interested in. However, a couple of years ago I ordered some narrow gauge War Department Class D bogie wagons for an Ashover Light Railway layout project. The models when they arrived were terribly striated and the surface details were very poorly defined.

Unfortunately, this supplier's models seem to only be available in one single type of material, which I've been informed isn't ideal for fine detail, and so I've made a conscious decision to not order from him again.

Kind regards,

Mark

3D printing is a kind of chicken and egg situation Shapeways attracts  a large number of amateur designers but their printing technology is not really suitable for small scale model railways. 

Rapid prototyping companies have more suitable technology for our purposes https://www.3dpeople.uk/sla-3d-printing but you need to either develop the skills to produce the CAD work yourself, find a friendly designer or pay for professional cad work.

Edited by Mayner
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Really interesting and certainly reflects what I have seen of 3D printed models. Indeed, the only smooth finish I've witnessed have been those done by Mark Clark. He advertises in Narrow Lines (7mm NG Society Magazine) and as a Chatham Club member has given several demonstrations to us. Mark has experimented widely with different 3D printers as they have come on to the market. However - and this remains the big caveat with 3D - even a small item can take half an hour to print and this grows exponentially with size, while the start up cost for something like a loco body is around the thousand pounds mark from a commercial point of view. Am sure there are others out there doing just as well too.

 For me, batch building in plasticard, or resin casting from my own masters are still preferable. Indeed, done carefully, the finish I've got from resin is excellent, you just have to make sure the air bubbles come to the surface and are pricked out with a fine reamer. Resin picks up the finest surface details, including putting in wood grain with a glass fibre brush. It is cheap too. £40 worth of resin makes a lot of wagon sides and ends. Check my CVR brake vans on Fintonagh. Note, this is not a sales plug, I only make stuff for myself, I mention it merely to suggest there are homespun alternatives worth looking into.

 At the end of the day, we choose what we want to do and all power to the 3D and CAD modellers, who are opening up new avenues to explore. Likewise laser cutters and the like. Etched and laser cut kits are light years ahead of hand drawn stuff of the last century and I for one am very grateful. Enjoy what you do, including solving problems along the way - the latter is a given in our hobby methinks!

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On 4/22/2020 at 7:57 PM, Angus said:

Thanks jhb171achill, your sharing of livery knowledge is very much appreciated!

In response to Mayner's difficulties with the van strapping I thought I'd post up my method here in the hope it may be of use to someone.

As with all techniques, it is how I do it, it works for me, there are many other methods.

I say my method, it is actually a tip I picked up from Jim Watt (CaleyJim over on RMweb) who also produces some Caledonian Railway wagon etches in 2mm scale. I've built some of these kits up (seen in the photo below on my UK based layout with the now obligatory 5p piece) and have another dozen or so in the "to do" pile.

8736977_Caleywagons.thumb.jpg.7b96d02853ec246d2f3298a6429d7e7d.jpg

 

The method is to take the etch with the strapping on and shade the areas you don't want to attach on the reverse side with a soft pencil (although HB will do) .

straping.thumb.jpg.de32b3be6c573cf1ebb1430b1bca9930.jpg

Tin the back of the etched strapping with a thin layer of solder.

Having applied a wipe of flux to the strapping and a drop to the van sides where you want the strapping to go you can then use the edges of the etch to position the strapping exactly where you want it, then press down with the hot soldering iron until you hear the sizzle of the flux and see the flash of solder.

The whole etch should now be firm attached. If so cut the strapping from the etch with a sharp craft knife and clean up with a couple of wipes with a fibre brush.

The solder will not adhere to the etch surround due to the pencil shading.

Hope that helps someone and that I'm not teaching granny to suck eggs!

Crikey look at that Dirigible! Love the RE.8 underneath too. Is that a Scratch build jobbie. 

I take it it has just popped out of the Hangar on the left, any links to this Layout?

 

 

Edited by Georgeconna
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3 hours ago, Georgeconna said:

Crikey look at that Dirigible! Love the RE.8 underneath too. Is that a Scratch build jobbie. 

I take it it has just popped out of the Hangar on the left, any links to this Layout?

Hi Georgeconna,

Thanks for your interest. The control car is a BE2 as used in the original SS class dirigibles in 1916. The control car is a white metal kit adapted to represent control car modifications. The remainder is scratch built.

The layout has been documented over on RMweb:

https://www.rmweb.co.uk/community/index.php?/topic/109742-rnas-glencruitten-relocating-lenabo/

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Banwy models who do a range  of Welshpool prototypes in 3d are a good example of what can be done .The cattle trucks and bolsters needed no fettling  just fit couplings and wheels and away we go.Andy.

14 hours ago, Mayner said:

3D printing is a kind of chicken and egg situation Shapeways attracts  a large number of amateur designers but their printing technology is not really suitable for small scale model railways. 

Rapid prototyping companies have more suitable technology for our purposes https://www.3dpeople.uk/sla-3d-printing but you need to either develop the skills to produce the CAD work yourself, find a friendly designer or pay for professional cad work.

 

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2 hours ago, Andy Cundick said:

Banwy models who do a range  of Welshpool prototypes in 3d are a good example of what can be done .The cattle trucks and bolsters needed no fettling  just fit couplings and wheels and away we go.

I wonder if they could be persuaded to broaden their horizons slightly.....😉

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After about three hours of careful sanding last night, mostly using a toothpick which was surprisingly effective, I was left with this

1514566626_mgwrbrakethirdpostsanding.thumb.jpg.b46441598346d0f780860b903977b704.jpg

Whilst not perfect it is a lot better than when it arrived. 

After re-scribing the doors and  a blast of primer:

781291845_mgwrbrakethirdprimer.thumb.jpg.e152d1fd6f17858d227bac488c425bbb.jpg

All in all I'm fairly happy. I might have a last go at smoothing out if the mood takes me. Please bare in mind the carriage is 2mm scale so reproduced here at lest a couple of times bigger than actual.

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Looks rather good to me. Can't have been easy trying to sand such a tiny item but the primer/witness coat says it was a success, especially as it is just 60mm long! Major blemishes will stick out like a sore thumb in anything that size, so very well done.

 If be interested to know how long it takes to get a 3D print to this stage, compared with building a kit (assuming one exists), or indeed a scratch build. Either way though, can't help thinking that a rake of these is going to look splendid.

 

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2 hours ago, David Holman said:

If be interested to know how long it takes to get a 3D print to this stage

Hi David,

It has taken me a shade under 4 hours to get to this stage, albeit I bought the print rather than design it myself. If you factor the CADing up then I suspect this would stretch to a couple of days depending on your CAD skills.

That said, if you had the CAD file other print options open up to you that have less cleaning up work but the printing is slower and not suited to any kind of batch production.

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