Jump to content
Richard EH

Oxford Rail Cowans Sheldon Crane

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

I couldn't find anything else online showing any C&L crane, which is a pity as C&L is my particular interest, having family in the area, it's great that the loco has at least been rescued and safe at Cultra, shame the ex TD no 5 didn't end up there too!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice comparison of the Inchicore crane on the left and the Athlone crane on the right working together. Interesting to see the differences including the jibs, The Inchicore 35T crane 295A would lift most bogie coaches alone except for maybe some of the full kitchen cars and GSVs. An E class however comes in at 38.5 - 42tons plus fuel

http://catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000306336

From the O' Dea collection

The 10T CBSCR crane at Inchicore April 1960

http://catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000304938

 

Broadstone Crane 2M laying waste to the Harcourt Street line 1959

http://catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000304525

Edited by DiveController
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, DiveController said:

Nice comparison of the Inchicore crane on the left and the Athlone crane on the right working together. Interesting to see the differences including the jibs, The Inchicore 35T crane 295A would lift most bogie coaches alone except for maybe some of the full kitchen cars and GSVs. An E class however comes in at 38.5 - 42tons plus fuel

http://catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000306336

From the O' Dea collection

The 10T CBSCR crane at Inchicore April 1960

http://catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000304938

 

Broadstone Crane 2M laying waste to the Harcourt Street line 1959

http://catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000304525

A single 35T capacity steam crane would struggle to safely lift a long object like a coach or bridge beam, usually two cranes are used in a "tandem lift" for such lifts  http://catalogue.nli.ie/Record/vtls000304303 

The maximum safe working load of a railway steam crane  is subject to the angle of the jib with a maximum lift capacity with a near vertical jib, with reduced capacity at shallower angles  . I found this out the hard way when I first hired a mobile crane on a construction site, fortunately the hire company rep insisted on visiting the site before supplying the crane. Fortunately the lift was a success and I got to play with all sorts of construction cranes 🙂

Image result for load chart 35 RB crane

 

 

  • Like 1
  • Informative 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I assumed the max rated tonnage would be for a near horizontal jib so in addition to better control I can certainly see the need for working in tandem now! I didn't notice and  lateral jacks/stabilizers extending from the sides of the crane and they seem to work with the jib close to the center of the rails. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Getting back to the original post (!).

Richard pointed me at a photo in the GNR history and at first glance, the proposed Oxford crane is the spitting image of the GNR's No.2 crane. There is a book, I believe on Cowan's, which should confirm that the GNR crane was the same, or similar to, the Oxford one.

I'm starting a "Book" on the exact date that Oxford have them on sales here - starting, say, two years from now? A Euro a bet?

Good news, though, for those with space in a siding on their GN layouts!

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Terms of Use