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Wexford70

Carriages behind a 121 in original livery

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No book specifically about them, but a number of books cover CIE’s 1955-63 railway modernisation programme.

To get the whole story, we need to go back to the GSR modernisation programme which resulted in the 1933, 1935 and 1937 “Bredins”, and the follow-up series of new CIE coaches in 1951-3. The bulk of what were known as “laminates” were a follow on from these, built 1956-61.

The pic appears to be a brand new rake, probably among the last built. 

Just a short time after that, the Cravens were introduced....

Last of them were withdrawn in the late 1980s.

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Fab photo. Brand new 121 in delivery livery hauling a pristine rake of new laminates in flying snail green livery. I remember going to Galway in a set like that out of Westland row.

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I regret that the current rolling stock has so little character compared to what has gone before. There was an elegance  even with the freshly painted MkIIIs.

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Posted (edited)

What I liked about the laminates was the sheer variety.

Anyone who hasn’t got it, try to get via fleabay the first edition of “Irish locomotives and rolling stock”, a small but very comprehensive “spotters book” by Oliver Doyle & Stephen Hirsch, published in the 1980s. You’ll be amazed at the various permutations of all things laminate....

Even the next edition of it, after which much of this stuff is withdrawn, is fascinating.

But a 1962 edition would have been the size of seven New York telephone directories due to the sheer variety of everything, and numerous one-off variations!

Edited by jhb171achill
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I loved that book! NI railways were fairly sterile in the 80s - although compared with nowadays it was a paradise of interest! CIE by contrast was an amazing happy hunting ground full of relatively ancient stock - with Inchicore yard full of even older relics such as the G class and Sulzers. The departure of trains such as the Sligo Mail from Connolly had a real sense of occasion about it. Add in the freight flow, the ancient signalling that persisted in many places, a crop of derelict rusty branches that still trailed enticingly off the main lines,  and you had a railway that held your interest ! 

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